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Maintaining Construction Management Mobility in All Situations

Maintaining Construction Management Mobility in All Situations

Today’s construction projects and job sites require teams to be nimble and agile so they can handle any surprises that come their way. But these capabilities don’t just happen. Construction leaders need to be proactive, encourage their employees to be ready for the unexpected and help set everyone up for success. 

In this episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast Jeff Gerardi, the president of ProEst Software, shares how to build a company that can adapt to changes on the job site and in the market. 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Executives have a leadership responsibility to move their company to the next phase with technology. Executive teams should carve out a more functional place in the day-to-day workings of their companies by being involved and supportive of new initiatives, while also empowering employees to be more proactive.
  2. Automation gives employees time to analyze and collaborate on what is happening in the field. Manual processes often lead to human errors and lost administrative time. By automating processes, leaders give their employees workflows that streamline processes and eliminate data silos by giving the entire workforce access to the information, increasing collaboration. 
  3. Transparency gives way to the best outcomes in the long run. Transparency can be a painful thing and lead to some tough conversations. But once a team gets over that hump, they will begin to experience higher levels of productivity and effectiveness. 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to The Mobile Workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill. And today we are sitting down with the president and CEO of ProEst, Jeff Gerardi. Jeff has been running ProEst since 1992. And today, we’ve asked him to join us, to talk about growing your business while keeping quality that you are known for. Welcome Jeff, we are so happy to have you on the podcast today.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Thanks Mike. Glad to be here with you.

 

Mike Merrill:

Thank you. So first off, I got to know, tell me more about your experience of working your way up from the very bottom in a company, as a new employee, to eventually taking the leap and becoming the CEO of the company.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. So I was in a unique position when I started, way back, multiple decades ago. Where I actually started as a salesperson, and literally after a year or two, the owner was just at a position where he was ready to retire, and asked me if I wanted to buy the company. And that point, I had one mouth to feed, so it was an easy decision. And I jumped in, and now we’re three decades into it, and it’s been a fun ride, but it’s been the most fun these last couple of years with the cloud and everywhere we’ve gone.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. That’s really awesome, and I think it gives hope to a lot of other people. If you’ve got big goals and dreams, you can make it happen, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Just got to be open for the opportunity.

 

Mike Merrill:

Very good. Awesome. Well, as a software provider, especially cloud-based software, it’s easy to see how technology can help us to solve problems across the board. But what I want to talk to you about today is more about helping your clients create those processes and structures within their organization, as it relates to the pre-construction management phase. So in your mind, where’s the biggest breakdown that typical contractors have when trying to create the standardizations for a pre-construction management process?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. So today, and I’m going to go back to who my biggest competitor is, and that’s Microsoft Excel, we like to call the big green giant, right? Every one of us on the phone uses it. We use it for multiple things, but it’s power is also all the risk that comes along with it. It’s really flexible, we know that. We’ve all used it, we’ve all built formulas and we’ve all looked at Excel and built things within it, and it’s really powerful. But it’s a silo, it’s a silo of information.

And for us, our client’s biggest hurdle is going from that 100% control over my silo, my Excel silo, to saying, “Now, there’s a company standard. Now, as we bring people onboard, we onboard new PMs, new estimators, new directors of pre-construction management, that there is a process that our company has developed that is a new standard within our business.” And as we start to put quotes out, there’s a standard we come to expect of what every one of them looks like, and what is the workflow every single estimate goes through. But certainly, letting go of that security blanket called Excel is one of the biggest hurdles, and not knowing what that journey is going to mean, right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Excel, I mean, we always refer to it as our spreadsheet addiction around here. It’s that safety net.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

We call it a monster, but I like that you call it an addiction. That’s a different twist.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yes, it is. Yeah. So in some cases it’s worse than paper because it’s so easy to erase and re-type whatever you want, and it looks cleaner, and it feels better].

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And hit a space bar, right? Hit a space bar, wipe out a formula. Now, all of a sudden a line which might’ve cost 50K is no longer being totaled into the summary at the bottom, and there goes my two, 3% profit.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Great point. Very valid, and certainly something that we’ve all heard horror stories about, or hopefully not too many of us, but some of us have probably experienced first-hand.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yah, it’s normally when we get the call, right after that day.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And so the listeners know, Jeff, again with ProEst, it’s basically a cloud-based estimating system. So what he’s talking about is putting those controls in place, so that people don’t have data siloed and at their fingertips ready to be kind of destroyed, or used in a way that’s not helpful to profitability.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And the lack of visibility. So if I have three, four people putting estimates together, and these days, obviously we’re all mobile for a need of what’s going on in the world, but having the visibility at a corporate level of seeing what’s our pipeline look like, because in essence, we’re a sales tool. What does our pipeline look like? What estimates are being produced? What estimates are coming due this month, this week, this hour? All that visibility, within a dedicated estimating platform is possible, with individual Excel silos, is not possible.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Great point. And everybody in construction management is familiar with the estimating side to some degree, whatever process they go through. But as it relates to your business, I’m sure you have tools within your business, technology tools, things that help you to keep on top of things, what things do you have in place that help you to avoid that communication breakdown from one person to another?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Communication within our business ourselves?

 

Mike Merrill:

Within ProEst yourselves. Yeah.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. That’s a great question. So do we talk the talk? So we’re certainly preaching cloud technology mobility. We internally, went to Salesforce to control our entire platform. Our entire company is run off Salesforce, and it has since 2006-2007. So we’re 13 to 14 years into being 100% cloud-based ourselves. So when COVID hit us all, six months or so ago, we didn’t miss a beat, we didn’t miss a call. Our employees were mobile the next morning, 100% up.

So, I mean, we’re walking what we’re preaching as well. Where we need to be mobile, we need to have technology, where we can access it from a browser but as well as from our phone. We can do that with ProEst, we can do that, obviously with Salesforce. And operationally, we are using Salesforce across the board. So not only our sales, but our client construction management, our tracking of customer support cases and feature requests, it’s all happening through a single cloud-based platform.

So I think we’ve even gleaned some lessons from that, that we’ve incorporated into our platform, like configurable workflow. What’s the process? What’s the process an estimate should go through? From coming in from a business development person, to going to a PM maybe, to validate it, to going to an estimator, what does that process look like? Is there a review process? Can we control and define a company-wide process that every estimate goes through? Just like for us, I mean, every lead goes through a certain process, every support call goes through a certain process. And it’s controlled at a corporate level, and we can get complete visibility.

So right now, I could look at a dashboard and see how many support calls there were today, how many got answered, where they done in the allotted amount of time, and are we meeting what we’ve set our bar to be a great customer service company? Are we meeting that bar? Well, I’ve got that visibility. I’ve got that data to back it up.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And our organization’s the same. We haven’t been down yet, since COVID or not. We’re using all of these tools. And we did it by accident. We didn’t mean to. We built our own CRM initially, and then eventually got on Salesforce also. And we use a different tool now that has some other options within the platform.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And we went down that path as well. So originally mid ’90s to mid 2000s, 2005-ish, we created our own CRM. We’re like, “We’re going to control this.” But that’s no different than having an Excel silo. So we quickly realized that this is not our expertise. Let’s bring in a system that could help us control this, so we can really put all of our efforts into making software, and products, and platforms that our clients could benefit from, and not build their own back-office stuff. So same type of good versus evil that our clients are going through, Excel versus a standardized estimating platform.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So what I’m hearing here, I mean really to circle this back to our listeners and some of the things, even running their own business, those communication breakdowns, it sounds like they occur when data of any kind is in a silo. It’s not what others can see, its what you can see, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. Yeah. I mean, if I get a report from an account manager as an example, and it’s in Excel, I’m not a happy camper. It better be in Salesforce as well, because otherwise there’s data being produced that could be helpful for our teams to help a client outside of our operational platform, which is Salesforce. So want everything there, so we can access it and help the client as a team, not just as an individual.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. Yeah. That’s great. You certainly are speaking my language on that.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Good.

 

Mike Merrill:

When we’re looking at standardized data across the whole user base then, what you’re saying is that eliminates gaps, that helps us be more efficient, helps us make better decisions. And so for a construction company, not only when it comes to software, but any process, it sounds like having that inner-office, inner-field visibility with the same data.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I mean, what is the process from a business development person bringing in an opportunity to a construction company, an estimate being created, and now that estimate’s been awarded, and is it in their ERP or the accounting system to properly now track the job costing? What’s that process like? It needs to be automated, especially as you scale. There has to be an automated process where the CEO or the executive team at that business could always look in there and see, where is this opportunity in our process? Is it an estimate? Has it been awarded? Is it being built right now? And if so, what’s the job costing data? Was the estimate accurate? Was it high? Was it low? Did we miss the mark on anything? But that visibility at least allows you to use data to make some real business decisions.

 

Mike Merrill:

So basically, better data collection tools. And then as far as workflow, I mean, when you talk about automation, what does that mean to you?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

So we built a configurable workflow. So I mean, in Salesforce terms, we can create a workflow that when an estimate gets started, first of all, who are the team members involved in it? Someone’s doing the estimating. Is there a director of pre-construction or someone that’s doing a review of that estimate? Does it go to an executive team for a sign-off, depending on the dollar amount of it potentially? Well, that can be automated, so that people automatically get emailed when an estimate’s ready for it to review. There could be an escalation involved as well. It needs to get reviewed in two business days, otherwise flags are thrown up because there’s a due date we need to make.

So that whole process, what’s involved in it? Could there be an escalation? And we want to make sure that there’s no bottlenecks. And if an estimate goes to someplace for a review and it sits there for a week, well that’s a problem if the bid was due in four days. So making sure that we have complete visibility into that, so we do not miss a bid due date. And there’s accountability across the board. And they can define their own. So how many steps does it have, and where does it go? How elaborate is it? We have clients that have three simple steps, estimate, to review, to send to client. We have clients that are controlling billion dollar construction budgets, like the City of New York as an example, and their workflow is much more elaborate because there’s different levels of review, there’s potentially 20 people involved in an estimate, could be a GC, could be 15 subcontractors, could be internal people as well. So as long as it’s definable, we have the ability to build a process, that’ll work across the business.

 

Mike Merrill:

So with that, what have you done, or have you seen done, or what are you trying to do to try and help adoption become more prevalent?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. I mean, adoption is really the key here. So from the beginning, during the sales process, we want to make sure that there is executive level buy-in to start with, because if they’re not driving the ship, it’s very easy to go back to Excel or to go back to old methodologies, and we want to make sure that never happens. So we want to make sure upfront that there is a serious commitment to technology. There’s a serious commitment to the next level of their growth. So as they scale, obviously things need to change to make sure that as they put 10, 20, 30, more people into their business, that there are systems and standards in place, so there’s not a huge load on them. They’re simply plugging people into an already defined process.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So you’re talking about helping them feel more comfortable with the tool, getting executive buy-in, so there’s a driver behind it. This isn’t optional. And when you’re talking, and it’s the same with software of any of the vendors that you would see in the construction marketplace, these things are key for any company to recognize is we got to have top-level down, not only support and buy-in, but actually motivated by whatever means necessary, mandate that this is what we’re doing. The bus is going, and it’s going that way. And you need to get on the bus if you want to be a part of it, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Right. Yeah. I think that’s certainly important from the top down, that if there’s a new direction in terms of technology, that there has to be certainly a mandate from above, but buy-in straight down through. So getting as many people involved during the presentation or demonstration phases as possible is important to get feedback, to get buy-in at that level. We think it’s imperative to making sure that a implementation goes live on schedule. Because after we sell a client, we go through an implementation. And we put a stake in the ground and say, “This is our go live date. So who’s responsible up until then? Now who’s the implementation lead on both sides? Who’s the executive sponsor on both sides?”

We have weekly check-ins. We automatically are sending these out because we want to make sure that the project stays on track, just like a construction project, no different. There’s a due date for the bids. And then there’s a start date for the project, it’s the same thing. And we’re excited to… We’re at the point now where we’ve defined the process over our decades of experience. And we feel like we’ve fine-tuned it enough that we know upfront, we’re going to present this implementation plan even during the sales process, so they understand what’s the level of commitment on both sides, because it’s a level of commitment. We’re not kidding anyone here. It’s new technology into a business.

I mean, we’ve even shifted gears where we used to charge per user, and we went away from that because we want company-wide adoption. So now we’re charging based off of a platform versus just a individual user. Because we want the estimators, the PMs, all pre-construction people on the platform. As well as, who else needs to touch it? The executives want to see the dashboard, the accounting department needs to grab estimates for our job costing. So the further we can reach our users, I mean the further within a company, ultimately, there’s no limitations. You can control your own users, and the securities around them, right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So what I’m hearing is you completely changed your delivery method of your system to companies, and there must have been some really specific reasons why you would do that major change in your business. What is that? So people can avoid it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

That goes right into workflow. So we defined what we thought was this amazing workflow, but then we charged per user and no one’s going to pay a per user cost. So that Mary, the head of accounting gets an email that a project was just awarded and there’s a bid coming her way. So the whole per user costing, we wanted more visibility of the estimate data throughout an organization, not just the estimating team, which might be three, four or five people, depending on the size of the company.

So we didn’t want people to be restrained by only certain users in the system. We want it to be full open, again, trying to eliminate silos. We created our cloud platform, which is now we’re, I don’t know, six years into this. We went live about six years ago. We wanted to make sure that we were not a silo. Because what we saw in the industry was an estimating silo, a takeoff silo, a CRM silo, an ERP silo, and it doesn’t help anyone. Certainly doesn’t help our end users. So vendors like us should open their gates, and say, “Here’s the data. Where does it need to go next? Does it need to go to timekeeping? Does it need to go to ERP?” Well, we’ve got complete tools built, so vendors can grab all that data and it never disappears within our platform. No more double-entry, triple-entry, thing of the past.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So really, it sounds like your decision to make it readily accessible to whoever, anybody who needs to see it… so the City of New York uses ProEst, not this department, this division. Is that right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

They have north of 1,000 users in the same account.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow, amazing.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

All collaborating on estimates, all access to the appropriate data that they’ve been invited to. So there’s still control around it, but it’s still wide open. It’s still wide open. And I think any technology, even if we were to implement a new technology at our business, we would certainly make sure that the data is accessible by all departments, that the data goes where it needs to go, and it’s not siloed in a single individual product. I wouldn’t bring a product in our company that is not first of all, cloud-based and forward-thinking, so that there are APIs and tools to allow us to grab data, to put it elsewhere if we need to.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So essentially, what you’ve done is you’ve helped contractors get out of their own way. In construction, we’re master negotiators, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep.

 

Mike Merrill:

We are always looking to work the deal the best we can. And so I may shave off a few users by not letting Mary in accounting have that license, to try and save money. But in the end, we’re getting in our own way and we’re forcing data into silos, because as a business, we’ve decided we’re going to tighten up that spend on our estimating system.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. Yeah. Why not define rules at a user level of what they can and cannot see, what they can and cannot do, and have it be full wide open? And for us, it was freeing. It’s like no longer do we think we have to charge a user for an individual license. It’s more us helping them adopt and drive our product and our platform throughout their business. Because we know it’s going to be more beneficial if it is widespread and everyone has access to the data.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Well, and when we have these discussions internally at our organization, it’s the same thing. We want to be one of those apps it’s on their home screen. Something that they’re used to using, they need it often. If we can do that, and get a brain share of the users. Then when somebody moves to a different organization, or there’s turnover, or a company slows down and has to have layoffs, those skilled workers are going to go somewhere else. And when they do, and they run into an Excel-based system, or paper time cards, or some other non-software, non-technological system or silo, like you’ve been talking, they’re going to say to their new employer, or to their new foreman or superintendent, “Hey, where I was just at, we used XYZ,” or, “We used ProEst.”

And there’s an opportunity now where a user that maybe otherwise wouldn’t have had that visibility, now actually has a voice and an opinion, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And I mean, we’re doing the same thing in our business. So certainly we have to be honest with ourselves and say, “We should bring the same idea to our client base. Of kind of open doors, and cloud technology.” And we started a new education program where we’re trying to get our platform to be utilized and taught at universities, to now teach new cloud technology. What’s going to move the industry forward? Well, it’s cloud technology, and ultimate collaboration between those tools as well, is really necessary for an industry that’s really slow to adopt technology. But that means there’s a lot of space for the executives in the industry to step up and say, “It’s time. It’s time to adopt technology that’s going to help us scale, and help our business work more efficiently and more productively, ultimately.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So going back to you as a CEO now, and the journey you’ve been through as an employee. What advice would you give to people that are trying to move up in their role? Or they’re entrepreneurs at heart, they got to start somewhere. What have you learned in your decades of experience?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I think ultimately, always being just thirsty for knowledge, thirsty to learn more. You’ll notice things in other industries that will help you, as long as you’re open to it. I mean, my first estimate, I’m 17-years-old, working for a guy in New York, I think we were painting or wallpapering contractor. I grew up in construction. And we walk into this room, his name’s Sal. He’s got a cigarette hanging out of his mouth that wasn’t lit. You know that guy, we all know that guy. We walk in the room, he looks around, he’s got his arms on his hips. He goes, “What do you think kid?” I go, “I don’t know, five grand?” He goes, “Let’s do it.” That was my first estimate.

But from then, everything’s kind of evolved. And as long as you’re continually learning, continually looking at new technologies, even if you look at another product, not necessarily a competing product, but a product that’s helping you schedule something in your personal life. I have three children, I have to schedule all their sports, and everything that’s involved in that, so I have a busy life. So what has been beneficial in other platforms that I could bring to my users, that will help their lives as well? Because we’re scheduling products, and we’re scheduling construction meetings. It’s all kind of combined. It’s something that we could learn from other tools and other applications as well, I think.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, and even, how many of us are using Amazon Prime? Or maybe you have an Autoship subscription. There’s so much of our lives, the bank accounts, the bills, the mortgage. I don’t even have a paper check book that I carry anymore for anything.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I’ve been banking online probably for 10 plus years now. So if I’m okay with my financials being online, I should be able to be okay with my estimates and my construction data being online as well.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So then… Oh, go ahead.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

You’re typing your credit card into Amazon every day, so if you feel comfortable doing that, and we’re all hosted on Amazon servers, and Rackspace is are our tier one support, so we certainly have the best security available in the industry right now. So that shouldn’t be a concern at this point. Obviously, security is always a concern, but if you make sure that the vendor you’re going with has those types of credentials and those types of securities in place, then that should be put to the back-burner. And now it’s about, how am I going to adopt this technology? How am I going to drive this thought throughout our business of how this will help us be a better company over wide?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. I think generally the populace within North America, of course, and even worldwide, has moved past those general initial concerns. Thank goodness. Because I remember 15-20 years ago when that was not the case. It was a hard sell, and they wanted it on their server, in their office, right down the hall. But-

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And we’re a technology company, we don’t have a server, okay? We do not have a server in our office. Everything we utilize is 100% browser-based.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So that’s something to be said for sure. So saying that now, going back to the market that we service, and that we work in and with every day, what are some of those objections that you get that you feel like kind of stall companies from moving forward with not only just estimating, but… Obviously, that’s your wheelhouse, but it effects everything.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. if I think about the potential clients that have stalled a decision, I think most of the time it’s the fear of unknown. What does implementing a new platform even mean? And we’ve tried to set up a implementation plan, which has, we call it the six steps to success. So we tried to be as transparent as possible, so they know what they’re going to go through, they know how much time each step is going to take. But there’s still an unknown, there’s still a leap of faith. First of all, with a company, and do we believe in the company? And I think secondary, it’s the product and the platform. And will all the employees within my business agree to utilize it?

That’s… above, and the excitement has to come from above. That there’s a technology change that’s going to help us move forward into the future. Yeah. I think it’s an exciting time, where we can make some changes. And I think the executives of the world, there’s a leadership responsibility now to help move your company into that next phase of technology. And there’s a lot of really cool technology out there now for the construction space, that wasn’t there even three, four years ago.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And I think to your point, they’re being forced. You’ve got religious services going on Zoom or online, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

There’s talk of the presidential debate being online. It’s interesting.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I have three children at home doing Zoom school right now. We had to double our bandwidth, but it’s working.

 

Mike Merrill:

And if your kids are like mine, they’re done in about an hour and a half.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Now what?

 

Mike Merrill:

But yeah, it’s more efficient at this time.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

It’s more efficient, and it’s a different world. Even at that level, at the education level, there’s more accountability. You don’t have as much in-person teacher communication. So now there’s more accountability to do a lot more work by yourself. No different than our clients having to make a decision, ultimately by their self. It’s their decision. But knowing that you have some support services to help back you up. And wherever you’re going, find the company that’s done it before. They’ve already sold clients that are your size, that are your stature. Make sure you talk to those clients. Ask clients what an implementation looks like. Call a client that’s only six months in. They just went through implementation, it’s fresh in their mind, either going to be fresh good, or fresh bad, you’re going to know about it right away. But I think that’s invaluable information to talk to a peer that’s just gone through it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, and I think too, and kind of to your point, your business is booming and you’re having unprecedented success. And part of it’s just because of that cloud visibility, that people, they can’t hide behind that rock anymore. They’ve got to get online, they’ve got to be on one platform, they have to have visibility. They got people working all over the place, some people working from home. The way they can do it. So in some ways this has really helped, I think the construction industry to get more online, get more mobile and really get on one platform, so they know what’s going on every day, on a daily basis. As opposed to a week at a time, when they have their round table meeting.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I think it’s time to get more creative when it comes to how we use technology. It’s time to take off the gloves and say, “Okay. What do we need to do to grow to the level we want to grow to?” You’re a $20 million company today, you want to get to a 50. What does that mean from a technology standpoint, and a systems, and a process standpoint to get me there? And it’s just one example. But certainly, when we all scale our businesses, there’s certain things that we need to do to make sure that we’re ready for that scaling and for that growth. So I think cloud technology certainly helps that, because it scales up and down really easily. It’s flexible. You can control the scaling hopefully, if you pick the right vendor.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. I’ve read a lot of different studies and reports, and construction is a laggard for sure. They’re second only to the agriculture industry in technology adoption.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Oh, we got the farmers beat? Is that what you’re telling me, Mike?

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Okay. So we’re not last, I’m happy about that.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. We’re only second to last. But if you ain’t first, you’re last.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

So we didn’t get picked last at dodge ball, that’s a good thing.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. But yeah, we meet with companies all the time that say, “It’s time we get innovative.” And the narrative has almost changed now to where I’m thinking, “You’re not getting innovative, you’re just catching up. You’re actually behind. Your competitors have already done this, and it’s time to kind of get current with the tools that are available to you now.”

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. I agree. And there’s so much more technology out there than there a couple of years ago. So I think now is the right time. There’s a lot of… I mean, on the ERP side, there’s multiple cloud-based options now, where there weren’t three, four years ago. So yeah. Being cloud-based now across a construction business is possible. So I think everyone owes it to themselves to do some research, dig deeper and find out where they could potentially gain some efficiencies in their business.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I think just like anything that we do that’s scary or new or different, there’s greater benefit on the other side of this fear than we’re going to get by holding back, doing the head in the sand thing.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. But maybe talking to some of those people that just implemented, or looking at some true case studies that some of your peers have done, it will help lessen that fear a bit. And say, “Hey, why can’t we do this? Our peer just did it. Let’s give them a call, and see what challenges they went through and talk through it.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Love it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And we got good guys, like you and me, here to help.

 

Mike Merrill:

There you go. That’s right. And like you, my background, I started in construction. It’s the same thing. Most innovative businesses were started to solve a problem that they experienced firsthand, and it’s no different here with ProEst, obviously. So in winding things up here, I just had one question I wanted to ask, and I like to ask each guest towards the end. So has there been a hack, or a shortcut, some kind of a process that you’ve come up with that’s helped you in business? That’s become your coined superpower for lack of a better term?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

My superpower?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I mean, my superpower, my wife would say is my crux too. And that is my kind of never-ending drive. You can call it a superpower, but always looking for new ways to improve my business, and improve my client’s experience with our platform has always been at the top of our list. Our core values for our business start with integrity, which is truly important, but also transparency. We want to be transparent with our clients and take them through everything we’re going through. We have challenges as a business as well, just like anyone else, we’re scaling now, added multiple employees this month. So we’re going through some of the same kind of challenges that they’re going through, and hopefully we’ve defined processes along the way to make it as painless as possible. And make things just fit together, and it be an easy process.

Because with enough pre-planning, it should be. And maybe I got to it there. Being able to look ahead, think about what your struggles are today and think through and plan for improvements. Whether that’s a technology, whether that’s another employee in a certain place, whether that’s a new process, whatever that process may be. But as much planning upfront is going to help the backend in terms of implementation and adoption, and everything that goes along with that.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great. So really, what I’m hearing is almost having a plan to execute and implement the plan.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And hopefully, we’re going to set it up for success. We’ve gone through it many times, where we’ve certainly had good implementations, and we’ve had not so good implementations. And hopefully we’ve learned from those not good implementations to continually improve our process. And I think it doesn’t matter if we’re talking about technology, or business, or your family life, we can glean something off of every experience to improve moving forward.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I love that. And that’s a great note to end on. So thank you so much, Jeff, for joining us today. Sure enjoyed the conversation.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

You’re welcome, Mike. Talk to you soon.

 

Mike Merrill:

Thank you. And again, thank you listeners for joining us on The Mobile Workforce podcast today, sponsored by AboutTime Technologies and WorkMax. If you liked the conversation or learned anything new and insightful that you can implement in your business, and you are interested in hearing more, you can look at us online or on Instagram at workmax_. Or please subscribe and rate us on your favorite podcast platform. Those five star ratings and reviews will help us to continue to provide this valuable service to the industry that we love, and hopefully help you improve those results in business and in life.

The Unseen Cost of Your Construction Process Problem

The Unseen Cost of Your Construction Process Problem

No one in the construction industry is sitting around on their hands. And if being busy equals success, then every contractor would be a millionaire. We invited Jeffrey Nesbitt, the director of consulting services at CLA, to come on the show and talk about productivity and the costs of not buttoning up your processes and procedures.

In today’s episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast, learn how to take a new look at your processes and determine what needs to change. Jeffrey gives contractors actionable ideas on how to implement new processes and how they can make sure that the new habits stick for the long term.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Your problem is costing you something. Inefficiencies in business are unavoidable and some are easier to ignore than others. But don’t assume because it’s out of mind, that it isn’t costing your bottom line. 
  2. Profit fade is a great indicator of issues that need to be fixed. Profit fade is the gradual loss of profit over the course of a project. Contractors should identify sources of trouble –– and address them –– to keep their profit levels steady. 
  3. Assign a point person ownership over new process implementations. Before launching a new construction process – whether it’s a technology solution or a time tracking requirement – put one person in charge of owning the implementation to ensure the rest of your team does their part. 

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Click Play to Listen to the Podcast Now:

Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to the Mobile Workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill. And today we are sitting down with Jeffrey Nesbitt, the National Director of Consulting Services at CLA. We asked him on the show today to talk about the cost of not fixing your business communication problems. Welcome Jeffrey. We are grateful to have you on the podcast today.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Thanks Mike. Appreciate you guys having me on looking forward to our time.

 

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. This’ll be fun. First off, why don’t you tell us a little bit about kind of your background, your company and the day-to-day for you?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I started off in this crazy industry, I don’t know, 16, 17 years ago. Did some estimating and project management for a masonry company. And soon discovered, although I love the work, that it probably wasn’t for me. From there actually jumped into the construction technology sector. Spent the better part of my career in the technology specific around construction for a decade or so before moving into CLA’s role here. Helping them head up their construction practice for our clients around best practices, operations and utilizing technology.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s awesome. Well, you have a very diverse background for sure. I’ve seen you around the “circuit”, so to speak, for most of those 17 years.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, we bumped in more than once. That’s for sure. That’s why I was looking forward to chatting with you guys today and sharing with you a little bit about what we’re doing and seeing.

 

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. Well, that’s great. Every week we try and have some meaningful conversations, things that hopefully we can bring some aha moments to people in the industry and in the trades. One of the things that we wanted to focus on with you today is really, what is the cost of companies not addressing or fixing their technology issues or challenges that you teach to companies?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

That’s a great question because that’s really what drove me to move to CLA. There’s a certain point in time when you’re on the software side or the operations, or being an actual contractor, where we have to merge these worlds together. We just saw at CLA that there was a gap there, if you will, that needed to be filled. We have over 9,000 clients at CLA and over 350 employees focused specifically in construction. We’re another verticals, but really in the construction, we’ve been voted number one by Construction Executive Magazine the last two years in a row. We’re really excited about that because, as a services firm, we want to bring more than some just traditional services. So, for us aligning operations and best practices and technology has been a key differentiator.

When we work with our clients, I know you guys see it too, contractors are busy. Everybody’s busy. There’s no one sitting around on their hands. We’re short staffed. We’ve got a lot to do. We all see challenges or things broken in our own companies or in our own lives. We’re so busy, we don’t have time to fix them.

To your point, there is a cost of not fixing problems. It’s the cost of what are you losing? That’s really what we try to focus on and share with our clients is, “Yeah, we can get better if we implemented a new mobile app.” That’s a true statement. But if we don’t have time to implement it, what is it costing us not to do that. That’s really where I help share with our clients that there is a cost to do nothing. A lot of times that cost outweighs actually doing something.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Very insightful. Again, with your background, you would know, no question about it. I guess if I’m trying to break it down, it sounds like you use the example of the mobile app. It sounds like communication tools are one area of improvement that companies could take, to kind of fix those communication gaps. What are some examples of things like that the companies can adopt to improve?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, the biggest hurdle in our industry is that communication and within communication is really data, isn’t it? That’s what communication is. We’re sharing information back and forth. And as contractors, if someone tells us, you’re a data company, we go crazy. “What are you talking about? No, I build high rises or I lay asphalt.” And all that fun stuff. But the truth is, you’re collecting data.

When you don’t have a way to get that information from the field to the back office, that’s where I see with our clients, profit fade happening. That’s what the big challenge is. We are so busy and a lot of times we understand we have challenges. It’s just not the technology piece, Mike. I think more importantly, it’s the process piece. That’s really where we focus our efforts, because if we can’t fix our processes, it doesn’t matter what technology we apply. It’s not going to help it, or in some cases, it’s going to make it worse.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s a great point. You mentioned a word, you talked about profit fade. What does that mean for our listeners?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

The simplest thing is margin. In our industry, we’ve got some of the tightest margins of any industry in the world, but yet we build the most complex projects. So, profit fade is when we take that very, very small margin and we start shrinking it down and down and down until there’s almost nothing there, because we’re not communicating effectively. We’re wasting time looking for project data information, that’s maybe causing conflicts out in the field, that may be causing reworks.

All this stuff adds up to time. Time is money. When we sit down with our clients and go through sort of, “What is it you’re doing today?” That’s where we really find out what’s the cost of doing nothing, Mike. When we find out, “Hey, what happens when a project manager’s got approve an AP invoice? What does that process look like?”

What if he has a change order and doesn’t submit it in a timely manner? It’s sitting on a notepad in his truck. Because mobile office. That’s the stuff that we look at. There’s been studies done by FMI, PlanGrid, even anecdotally myself, it will show that, in a typical week, there’s almost 35% of people’s time spent on non-optimal activities. That’s the cost of doing nothing. That’s hours. If your PM’s losing four to five hours a week, that’s money. If you’ve got five, 10 PMs, that could be another full-time employee. Who wouldn’t love to find a full-time employee in this market.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Right. Great point. Yeah. A lot of construction companies have those resources. They’re just not leveraging them properly, because they’re wasting time on tasks and efforts that don’t bring revenue.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s really clean up those internal processes first. The old Michael Jackson song, The Man in the Mirror. You got to do that first look inside and say, “What am I doing, Mike?” I’s hard as a contractor, we’re proud people and we love to just do it ourselves. “Yeah, I know what the problem is and I’ll fix it myself. Who’s got the leakiest roof in the neighborhood, it’s the roofing contractor. Why? Because he doesn’t have time. There’s just no time.

That’s why I always encourage people. If you can bring in somebody to help you to actually manage this process of, “Hey, how do we clean up some of these internal things and figure out what is best practices?” That’s when you can apply technology. Otherwise, you’re just buying technology, for the right purposes. People have good intentions in their hearts. Owners are buying mobile applications, whether it’s a project management, mobile timekeeping, forms in the field, things like that. But if they don’t implement a process that the technology can support, then you’re really losing user adoption. There’s no ROI for these folks, unfortunately.

 

Mike Merrill:

What I’m hearing and something that I always like to say too is, “Software to work properly and to be of value requires users.” That means they have to use, if they’re not opening the app and leveraging the tools within it, then there’s no value.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I haven’t seen an app yet that’s like a genie bottle where you rub it and unicorns and rainbows shoot out and everything’s wonderful. It still takes people and processes. The technology is that last piece. You have to do those other two things first in order to leverage technology. Then again, it’s consistently reinforcement and training. Configuring that technology to mirror your processes also helps in the user adoption, because this is the way we work.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love that you talked about people and processes, because again, software can be the magic bullet, but without people utilizing it properly, it’s shelfware collecting dust.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

What are some of the challenges that you see most prevalent in construction companies today to avoid adoption or to kind of knock the adoption into a rut and then what can companies do to help avoid those pitfalls?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Well, it’s all about commitment. It’s like anything else in life, if you’re not committed to something or the activity or the task at hand, it’s not going to be successful. You have to have commitment from senior leadership first, then you have to have a plan in place that supports that commitment. Which is, how do we utilize this technology? How do we leverage it in our day-to-day functions? Then furthermore, it’s making sure that they’re doing these things.

If you’re going to buy a project management solution or a mobile timekeeping solution, when you’re having your weekly or monthly PM updates, are you reviewing the reports that the software generates? That helps encourage people that, I have to utilize this tool, because every Friday I’m going to sit down and the boss is going to pull it up and say, “Well, where’s the data? Where’s the numbers?”

You sort of have to build that into your management processes to encourage people getting on board and utilizing the technology. If there’s no accountability there, if we’re not referencing the tool or we’re using it to manage our projects or processes, then you’re exactly right, it can get thrown on a shelf. That’s what happens with mobile stuff. I know you see it, Mike, most of all. It’s not like an accounting system where, “Hey, we got to run payroll, so we have to do it.” It really forces it. You have to take that same thought process and apply that to your field tools.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great advice. I think one of the things, I always hear this phrase, “You can’t manage what you don’t measure.” I love that and agree with it. However, just because you’ve measured it, doesn’t mean you’re done. You’ve got to execute and apply that measurement to that process. Then, now you’re leveraging the data. People are depending on it and counting on it. There’s kind of a plan to execute the plan. So, here’s what we’re going to measure. Here’s what we’re going to do to review and be accountable and report on those findings. Then, you can actually invoke change is what I’m hearing you saying.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Absolutely. When I look at our clients and we talk, the people that aren’t learning today from that data that they’re collecting and the information, those are the ones unfortunately probably won’t be around tomorrow. We used to be in a market where we could throw more people at a problem and fix it. We don’t have that today. If we can’t take these tools and utilize them to turn 1:00 PM into 2:00 PM, have a field supervisor be able to manage just one more project on his plate. We can have the revenue going up without adding the headcount. We can make more effective decisions as an organization. I joke with contractors, I’m like, you’re a data management company and a learning organization. If you’re not, you need to be, because your competitors are.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love that. I’ve heard of contractors referred to as risk managers. That’s what they are. I love that you are calling them a data organization. I haven’t heard that phrase before. I hope you don’t mind if I steal it a little bit.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

No, just don’t trademark it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Mike Merrill:

Helping each other out. What I’m hearing though, is that there are some costs to put these processes in place. Some of it’s money, that’s the obvious one, your time, a consulting firm’s time, a software provider’s time. Then, when we get an investment in a process or a solution that we feel like is going to be beneficial, hopefully there’s an ROI or return on investment on that technology, right?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

How long have you seen some of those take, for example, maybe a couple of different systems or process you put into place? Maybe you can share some generic examples, so people know what they’re looking at.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

When you talk people, process and tools and software, that really is that triangle of truth, if you will, of when we put things together. For me, the ROI on the people, process and software is probably the most easy thing to measure. If I look at mobile timecards. I just was at a client last week, they’re still using paper timecards. We’ve got over 9,000 clients. A lot of them are still using paper timecards. That’s one example where I look at it and I say, “Okay, it’s taking you 20 minutes to get a timecard processed.” That’s from the time that they get it to the office, to them entering it into whatever accounting system they have, to being able to update their job cost reports and then print checks. Well, you know, a simple tool like a mobile timekeeping, that could save you 15 minutes.

That’s like an easy ROI. “Okay, well, 15 minutes times how many employees?” I mean, that’s simple math. For me, it goes so far beyond the ROI, which I think in any application nowadays it’s a year or less, it’s six months or less in some of these mobile apps, quite honestly. But what’s the real value, is visibility. It’s visibility into your job, a snapshot, a look in a window at any point in time. That to me is way bigger than anything I’m going to spend on consulting and or software. Because, I want to know from the time of an occurrence happening to the field, what does that cost impact realized in the office, so I can make a decision. That is shortening that cycle. That’s profit fade. How do we get it down?

For me, it’s about having confidence in my numbers, visibility to my organization, to make decisions about the future of where we’re going to go. Forrester Research, they did this study that said you have only 12% of the available data executives doing decision-makers, were making a decision on their company. That, to me, is the value. Can you imagine in this world, something we can all relate to, COVID-19. When you go into your doctor, are you going to accept 12% of his diagnosis only. Where in life is this acceptable?

 

Mike Merrill:

Or some kind of a bad illness and they say you got a 12% chance of living. Not very good.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, exactly. Only 12% of the solution. To me, that’s the bigger picture. Owners and executives, when I talk to our clients, I’ll be honest, that’s what keeps them up at night. Is not understanding or having that visibility on what’s happening in a project, or even having confidence in it.

 

Mike Merrill:

I read another report, it was McKinsey and Associates, they said that according to that one, it was a certain segment of questioning, but they said that only 6% of the data was being leveraged. This is a few years back. Whether it’s six or 12 or even 20, it’s horrid.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Let’s say 40%, congratulations, it’s still not good enough.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Unbelievable. What I’m hearing is really data is the key to not only improving, but really making those decisions that are not only going to make you around next week, next month, next year. There’s a huge opportunity to widen the gap between you and the competition if you can harness this data, even a fraction more.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, absolutely. I think, again, it all just walls back into that, “Hey, how do we clean up our internal processes?” Because, when we go out and we talk with our clients, one of the commonest things I hear is, “I work with the estimating department. I work with the accounting department. I work with project managers, the field, the sups.” The reality is, it’s the way we estimate a job, it’s not the way we account for a job, which is not the way we manage or build it in the field.

But everyone in that company is touching a job at any given point in time. You have to connect those bridges and those dots together to get the full picture in your organization. For companies that are productivity driven, this is really, really important. The units in place, the quantities, the linear feet, square feet, all that type of measureables. If you’re not seeing that in real time today, that’s the real challenge in the market.

 

Mike Merrill:

Real time productivity tracking and trending, I guess, is what I’m hearing.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, absolutely. It’s the hugest risk that contractors are facing right now. Especially when they have separate estimating, accounting, project management tools. If they’re not all talking to each other and you’re still having to do data entry from one to another, that’s definitely a red flag or an area for risk.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. So, integrating that data, letting it communicate with other systems or sharing of that data, I heard the real time component. Does that mean cloud-based solutions are kind of where you try and push that or-

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

This is not a personal religious belief of mine or anything, but it’s all to the cloud. It’s trending there. It’s all there. The reality is, is even the ones that are still sell on-prem, you host it and that’s what they push. The market wants that. I know our clients at CLA want that. They’re not looking to become IT companies. The thing I always hear most is, is “I bought my last server. What do I need to do?” Because no one needs those any more in the storage closets and all that fun stuff.

Yeah, having a cloud-based software is more important now than ever. I encourage the contractors listening that whatever product you pick needs to be like Switzerland. It needs to play well with others. Because, it’s about the best solution for the right department to achieve what they need to do. But, as an organizational holistically, ownership needs to say, “Hey, do these things all play well together, because I’m not buying four applications that have four people have to type in information into each one.”

 

Mike Merrill:

You sound like a guy that’s been around the block a time or 10.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I have. I’ve got a weird background. I try to use that to leverage to help the contractors. I have a passion around the industry, because we get to see it everywhere. Isn’t it exciting when you walk out your door and you see our industry and the homes you just locked out, the bridge’s tolls you’re going across, the highways. It’s an exciting industry. I do have a passion around making sure we are efficient in what we do and profitable.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I love that. It is everywhere and it touches everyone. I live in a home somewhere, an apartment or condo, whatever it is.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Right.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re living in a structure and somebody had to build that thing and has to maintain it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

And the roads you drive down, the bridges, like you say. It’s what attracted me to it. I always wanted to get into construction, because I wanted to be able to do those things. I don’t know my path to get there, but it unfolded before me. I took those roads that led me down the path. Those led me back here where I’m helping growing a software company. But, that company serves the construction industry because just like you, that’s where my expertise and my passion have been. It’s great to have friends in the industry that feel passionate and excited about it like I do.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s an exciting time, I think in our industry. I think it’s been trending that way as you know, for probably the last five to seven years, but really here in 2020, it’s really picked up with the pandemic. I know within our clients, if they weren’t stressing about PPP, they were reaching out to me to say, “Jeffrey, in this, no, on-premise no touch world, how do I know what’s going on with my projects? We can’t drive timecards into the office anymore because the payroll clerk ain’t there to pick them up.”

 

Mike Merrill:

If they are, they may not want to touch the paper.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Right. Exactly. We’ve been trending this way, but really it’s been kicked into overdrive this year, because of the pandemic. I don’t think it’s ever going to go back. I think organizations are learning that this is where the efficiencies are in operations. You can make your accounting department a little more efficient, but usually they’re running pretty lean. It’s in the operations. It’s in the project management. It’s in the field. It’s in the crews. It’s in time keeping. It’s in solutions around those areas.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nobody gets paid until somebody built something or put something in place. That means the dollars can either stack up or be siphoned out at that point. So, leveraging that data in real time as those things are occurring, so you can make those decisions. It feels like you’re saying that’s kind of the low hanging fruit, is kind of capturing that at the source initially, then let everything else, all that data roll through the process where everybody else can make decisions based on that.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s at the source and the source of it, it could be anything. It could be at the estimating level, it could be at the field or the accounting level. As I mentioned earlier, everything’s interlinked. So as the life cycle, the job happens, the right person should be entering the right data at the right time, so we can use that to make better decisions.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s great. All right. We’ve talked about some of those gaps, some of those challenges. Are there any stories you can think of, generically, you don’t have to name clients, but where somebody actually put something in place, like these things we’re talking about, and actually shared their surprising results with you and excitement or enthusiasm of “Oh, wow”, anything that comes to mind? Yeah.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. The low-hanging fruit I always find is in the payroll piece. I find it in accounts payable, believe it or not. Then I find it in project management. Sometimes, when we look at a payroll process, like I said, “Hey, if we can cut 15 minutes off, it could save us all this time.” A lot of times, with the mobile apps, there’s more things than just the payroll. There’s different forms out there that they’re filling in, or they’re taking pictures that could relay problems to offset.

I can tell you on the payroll side, I’ve seen companies save literally millions of dollars, a large contractor that had lots of employees, 10,000 employees. Let’s just say they could save, it was $3, $4 million annually every year, year after year after year. But more importantly, what happened is, is it gave them that visibility into some of those job cost reports like we were talking about. Where they were starting to see some of these labor overruns happening quicker on their jobs than they were previously doing. When they weren’t blowing out the truck window or being stuck under the seat, they were missing those opportunities. Depending on the size of contractor you are, it could be substantial.

 

Mike Merrill:

In those cases, were those companies surprised?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Like I said, Mike people recognize they have challenges or problems. It’s the whole, “I don’t have time to fix it.” That’s why I like to say, “There is a cost of doing nothing” Again, that’s both fiscally money lost, but more importantly, I think it’s opportunity and visibility. Right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Opportunity costs, meaning, I guess if we put this in maybe a trades contract or context, if you’re framing 50 homes a year, one a week or something. That takes you 600 man hours to do it on paper. What I’m hearing is maybe they could do it really in less hours that are now paid and documented because of a real-time app, as opposed to pencil with a timesheet.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Significant. You could figure it out or you have a consultant come in who can figure that out. But the truth is, is I would imagine, it could add up to several or a dozen extra homes a year.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. It could even be a month.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Yeah. Big opportunity. Really, when I hear that and I put my contractor hat back on and think about when I was in business trying to do this same thing, this same hustle, that’s exciting that most businesses today are profitable in their current processes and market. If they could make these changes and invest that little bit extra money in a system and a little bit of their resources, you said six months, or maybe even less on some of these things.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Oh, absolutely. Yes, absolutely. It used to be a year, an average sort of, when we looked at across different tools. Let’s just say, whether it was estimating, accounting, the field, it’s down to six months. Like I say, timecards and AP processing, even billing, quite honestly, is improving cash flow and forecasting, when you could tie in some of these mobile applications that let the PM do the billing out in the field.

 

Mike Merrill:

You mentioned before, you talked about change orders and maybe it was on somebody’s book, in their mobile office, their truck, sitting on the seat, now they missed the window or opportunity to submit that bill. Maybe there’s unbilled labor that you’re spending the money on investing and getting nothing for. So the opportunity is gone, the cash is gone and you can’t bill anybody to replenish any of that. Right?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. I worked with a contractor to be nameless and they had some good tools. They had the good software application. They had a good project management software application. Like I said, if it’s not like Switzerland and it doesn’t play well with others, it doesn’t do you any good. Because, when I went in there and sort of did the review, you go in and you find a $300,000 change order for a job that’s been closed for a year. Right? Again, it’s knowing that, and knowing it in a timely manner is more important, isn’t it? What we thought we had winners on, we sometimes have dogs. We didn’t get an opportunity to fix it, because it wasn’t integrated.

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting. When you hear that pushback, have you had companies that pushed back then maybe came back down the road later and said, “You know what, I think we just got to bite the bullet and do this.” What are some of those experiences?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I would say for the most part, by the time it hits my desk or my team’s desk, there’s a fair amount of pain. Through some conversations, they realize, “Yeah, we need to do this because we can’t keep kicking the can down the road” type of thing. Yeah, absolutely. Where we talk to them, we share some challenges that we’re seeing in their market or their industry or their local, as I mentioned, got 130 offices. Each sort of market has its own unique individual challenges. They’ll come back and say, “Yeah, you’re right.” Unfortunately, it’s after they probably lost on a job somewhere by not addressing it and said, “We got to do it now.”

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re more in the emergency room level of care, not the clinic down the street?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Sometimes I get brought in, when the fire is on the fifth floor as opposed to the ground floor sometimes.

 

Mike Merrill:

They’re coming in, in an ambulance.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Exactly.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s why it’s just best to… “When’s the right time? No time like today” is what I say.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Like planting a tree, they say.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

When’s the best time to plant it? 20 years ago.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, exactly. They’re starting to feel, with this pandemic, these different challenges. I think it’s bringing it sort of to the forefront a little bit, which, if there’ll be one good thing out of 2020, maybe that’ll be it.

I’ve heard that from a lot of companies, actually. They said, a lot of this stuff has been long overdue. This is just forcing our hand. Even with the social distancing and kind of the safe environments they’ve got to create, so maybe they don’t have as much labor. They’ve got to do more work with less people. They’re just being forced to get rid of these extra steps and processes and make decisions that give them visibility that they didn’t never put the time into or the money into before.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I think it just leads back to the labor shortage. Like I said, we used to throw people at the problem and we had a bunch of them. We could overcome it with manpower. We just don’t have that today. How do you overcome some of these challenges of getting projects done efficiently and timely when you don’t have people to sort of toss at it? I think that’s been a big driver for folks is, “I can’t find another PM qualified. Maybe I find a junior PM, but how do I support him?” You can’t just give him a note pad and a pencil and tell him, go at it and talk to the 10 other PMs you got, because they’re all doing things differently. There is a way to solve that problem.

 

Mike Merrill:

It also to me, brings up another interesting point you just talked about, kind of these younger PMs are putting somebody in new. I continue to hear out there that there are less and less people entering the trades out of school, if they’re even going to school. The blue collar worker is going the way at the Dodo, it seems by statistic. We’re going to need, as an industry, to invest in tools that can replace the lack of people that we probably aren’t going to have moving forward.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

It’s really about automation, business process automation. So automate where you can in your processes and that’s what we help companies with a lot. Which is, this is a process we can automate, so we can free up people to do the things that we can’t automate today. Shifting people around organizationally to get better value out of them and taking away some mundane processes. Then again, you have to develop the tools for this market and industry, because the labor force is changing. It’s not a guy coming in saying, “I want to do this manual job or drive a backhoe.” You know, what’s real interesting, is flying a drone over my job site and tracking productivity that way or using it for security measures. The workforce is changing and they’re expecting some of these tools to be there. We really do need them to help recruit these people in.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I’ve got a daughter, she’s in ninth grade, she’s my youngest, even in elementary school, she was able to check her grades on a daily basis online. That’s all she’s ever known. I remember we’re a similar age I think, I remember not knowing until the day grades came out, necessarily what I was going to get because there was no-

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

All you get is a manila folder that the paper you pull it out. All the carbon copies that went to the parents and teachers and stuff.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re right. I think society, generally the youth, have been conditioned to not only be fluent with these applications and with mobile technology, they depend on it. They count on it and they expect it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Scary enough, Mike. They don’t even do spelling tests anymore, because kids are all using technology and they’re not learning to spell. Everything-

 

Mike Merrill:

We all have spell check.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Auto-correct as you go. If you’re like me and I always encourage the field guys, I use the microphones. I’ve got big fingers. So if you can’t type it, do the speech to text.

 

Mike Merrill:

Perfect. Well, that’s great. I’ve had a great time talking with you. There’s a lot more we could dive into and we’ll have to try and schedule another call coming up and do some more of this. I guess before, as I kind of wind up here, one question I’d like to ask towards the end of these conversations is, what’s one hack or skillset or process, something that you’ve kind of learned through your years of experience, that you count on regularly, if you had a superpower, what’s that thing that makes you, Jeffery?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I think it’s understanding, I don’t know if it’s a super power as much as it is nose to the grindstone type thing, which says, “If we want to achieve X and Y, and that’s what we’re saying as a company, let’s work backwards from that to today and put a plan in place of everything we need to do to achieve that goal. Then let’s all agree on it and then commit to it, set measurable KPIs and hold each other accountable to achieve it.”

Just like software. It’s no magic bullet. There’s no magic bullet to success. It’s hard work. It’s planning for success and following the plan.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love it. Boy. Well said. That’s a great way to end. Thank you again for joining us today, Jeffrey. This is very enjoyable and I think not only the listeners, but myself, I gained some valuable insights from you, so I appreciate it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Thank you and don’t forget that trademark, we’re splitting it 50/50.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sounds good. All right. Well, thank you to the listeners for joining us today on the Mobile Workforce podcast, sponsored by AboutTime Technologies and WorkMax. If you like the conversation Jeffrey and I had today, or were able to learn anything new and insightful, we encourage you to please follow us on Instagram at WorkMax underscore and subscribe to the show on iTunes or your preferred platform for listening to podcasts.

Also, if you enjoyed the podcast, please share it with your industry friends and leave us a five star review and rating, so we can continue to bring these valuable conversations to you and your organization to help improve your business and your life.

WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS by AboutTime Technologies Enriches Integration with Top Construction Accounting Systems and ERPs

PRESS RELEASE Permission Profiles

PRESS RELEASE Permission Profiles

WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS by AboutTime Technologies Enriches Integration with Top Construction Accounting Systems and ERPs

Clones accounting system project cost and organizational structure for accurate daily job costs to minimize reallocations with Permission Profiles

(Payson, UT – May 14, 2019) AboutTime Technologies, a 16-year veteran of on-premise and cloud- based mobile resource management, today announces that it has expanded its integration with the top construction accounting systems and ERPs with WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS. WorkMax is an easy-to-use cloud-based platform for employee time tracking, mobile forms, and asset tracking that allows project-based businesses to manage each of their mobile resources all in one place.

Permissions Profiles allow businesses to accurately track daily job costs and drastically reduce reallocations or adjustments to job costs after-the-fact. Permission Profiles allow users to create a unique profile with a set of individual permissions that can automatically be assigned to new employees. Most project-based businesses have hundreds, if not thousands of cost codes or tasks to track a project’s job costs and completed work. Permission Profiles determine what employees see when they’re entering their completed work and labor hours. This ensures that they are assigning their labor to the right jobs, projects, locations, tasks, cost codes, or assets. With Permission Profiles, employees can only select tasks or cost codes that are part of the appropriate project cost structure based on what’s been set up in the business’ accounting system or ERP.

Permission Profiles can also restrict which mobile forms are visible to employees in the WorkMax application. Only the employees that need to complete the mobile forms are able to view them and saves the employee’s time instead of searching for the mobile forms they need to complete. Permission Profiles can be set up to automatically apply permissions to track more than employees, jobs, cost codes/tasks, devices, assets, and forms by creating or importing custom list items. Custom lists provide businesses with the flexibility to track whatever they need. Examples of custom lists include employee leave codes, certified classes, or per diem allowances.

“We kept hearing that project-based businesses spent too much time reallocating job costs due to data entry errors by field employees. The bigger the list of jobs or cost codes the more adjustments they had to make in their accounting system or ERP. Also, the project job costs and completed work was always out-of-date. We looked at the data visibility goals that our customers wanted to achieve in their accounting systems and ERPs for job cost accuracy and mirrored those options in WorkMax. With Permission Profiles, we gave them an easy way to get the right data to the right employees at the right time for real-time accurate project job costs,” said Ryan Remkes, chief executive officer of AboutTime Technologies.

WorkMax has powerful and robust integrations with the top construction accounting and ERP systems including:

Mike Merrill, COO of AboutTime Technologies, will be demonstrating Permission Profiles for the first time at the TUG 2019 National Conference on Tuesday, May 14th at 10:45 AM CDT at the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort and Spa. TUG is the national user group for Sage 300 Construction and Real Estate, Sage 100 Contractor, and Sage Estimating.

For a full list of all of the accounting, ERP, payroll, and HR systems that WorkMax integrates with click here. To learn more about WorkMax’s Permission Profiles, click here to view the video. 

 

AboutTime Technologies Launches WorkMax ASSETS, a Cloud-based Asset Tracking Solution for Web and Mobile

WorkMax ASSET Tracking Press Release

WorkMax ASSET Tracking Press Release

AboutTime Technologies launches WorkMax ASSETS, a Cloud-based Asset Tracking Solution for Web and Mobile

Automates businesses, reduces asset loss, improves productivity, and optimizes asset utilization across entire workforce anytime, anywhere, and on any device for project-based businesses of any size

ASSET Tracking WorkMax Logo with Cloud

 

 (Payson, UT – May 7th, 2019) AboutTime Technologies, a 16-year veteran of on-premise and cloud-based mobile resource management today launches its third cloud-based solution, WorkMax ASSETS. WorkMax ASSETS by AboutTime Technologies is now available along with its previously released WorkMax TIME and WorkMax FORMS. WorkMax ASSETS automates asset tracking and management across a business’ entire workforce anytime, anywhere, and on any device to reduce asset loss, optimize asset utilization, and accurately assign assets. WorkMax ASSETS simplifies asset management, inventory tracking, and asset utilization and allows you to assign assets to locations, employees, and projects. Daily usage of assets per location and or the assignment of assets to or from employees or locations can be managed all in one app with WorkMax ASSETS.

WorkMax ASSETS is much more than just a better spreadsheet; it organizes all of your asset inventory all in oneAsset Tracking for WorkMax Screenshot centralized place and makes it easy to keep asset inventories organized through the use of parent/child hierarchies. WorkMax ASSETS also connects the field to the office by tracking their asset assignments and asset usage with their smartphone or company tablet or iPad with or without a connection to the internet or cellular service. All the data is stored locally on their mobile devices and can be synced as soon as the employees have internet access. The power of the WorkMax platform allows businesses to combine multiple WorkMax platform solutions to streamline the workflow of their project-based businesses. When project-based businesses pair WorkMax TIME with WorkMax ASSETS, they know who is specifically assigned an asset in addition to tracking the number of hours the tools or equipment was used. Another example of the power of the WorkMax platform is that companies can use WorkMax ASSETS together with WorkMax FORMS to track detailed maintenance, breakage, or equipment safety checklists for that asset all in one app.

“Assets are typically the second largest expense item on the balance sheet and we developed WorkMax ASSETS to make it easy to know who has an asset, where is that asset located, when was it checked out or in, and when it is available to use. This allows any size business to more efficiently manage their projects to increase profitability,” said Ryan Remkes, chief executive officer of AboutTime Technologies, “we worked very hard to create a best-in-class asset solution while taking into account the workflows that project-based businesses needed to optimize their business processes. WorkMax ASSETS achieved all of this and then some.”

WorkMax ASSETS key features include:

Flexibility

  • Access through mobile iOS or Android apps to connect mobile, remote and office employees
  • Handles small asset inventories at one location, as well as large asset inventories utilized across unlimited locations and assigned to an unlimited number of employees
  • Unlimited user roles and permissions to fit businesses as they grow in number of employees or number of assets in their inventory

Easy-to-Use

  • No need to log into multiple apps or multiple sessions on your web browser to manage your mobile resources. WorkMax is one app and one web login for employee time tracking, mobile forms, or asset tracking. It’s all in one app or accessible from one website and one login.
  • Flex-fields allow businesses to personalize with their specific industry terminology for rapid user adoption
  • Adaptable user roles and permissions ensure employees are presented with only the information they need to see
  • Employees can enter asset tracking or utilization data into the WorkMax ASSETS App with or without internet service

Accuracy

  • Mobile employees can transfer assets from one employee to another from their mobile device to know who has each company asset
  • Capture accurate asset usage and asset assignment in real time for precise job costs
  • Eliminate re-keying of data from the accounting system, spreadsheet, or equipment rental database when you sync your business systems with WorkMax

Visibility

  • Know where company assets are and who is assigned to each asset to reduce loss and optimize labor productivity
  • Reduce overutilization and underutilization of assets to extend asset life with global visibility of asset inventory
  • Everyone has appropriate access to asset inventory and usage from anywhere, anytime and from any device
  • Single centralized database accessible from anywhere and on any device and at any time reduces time spent locating assets with real-time asset tracking

Efficiency

  • Instantly find assets by unique number, bar code, pick list, or even serial number
  • Minimize downtime by knowing which assets are used most often 
  • Eliminates time spent making phone calls, emails, and texts trying to locate tools and equipment

Integrations

  • Powerful and configurable integrations with many accounting systems and business applications to keep data in sync and more accurate
  • Employees can see assets assigned to them or check them out or in on Clock IN / OUT all in one app when you combine with WorkMax TIME with WorkMax ASSETS
  • Use WorkMax TIME with WorkMax ASSETS to track employee’s operator time on that asset.
  • Combine WorkMax FORMS and WorkMax ASSETS to track detailed maintenance, breakage, or safety checklists all in one app
  • Utilize the WorkMax ASSETS Reports for customer billing and documentation.

For more information about WorkMax ASSETS, visit http://www.workmax.com/workmax-resource-management-solutions/track-assets-and-equipment. To get pricing and get started with WorkMax ASSETS today, click below. 

Get Pricing Orange

 

What is WorkMax?

WorkMax Service Phone and Mac

WorkMax Service Phone and Mac

What is WorkMax? Why now?

By: Ryan Remkes, CEO

WorkMax is the total sum of everything learned from delivering resource management software solutions to many, many businesses over the last decade. WorkMax is modern, fast and completely scalable. The platform of modules affords businesses of any size, shape and industry to enjoy modern resource management exactly the way they need it. WorkMax is the culmination of real-world customer needs learned from AboutTime, in a beautiful, modular web-based solution to help customers better manage TIME, ASSETS, FORMS, FIELD SERVICE and REAL-TIME BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE. 

Internally, WorkMax has been known around our corporate office as “Next-Gen” for a couple of years now. The ambitious design-build journey towards what is about to be better known as WorkMax actually began in 2003. AboutTime set out to solve the problems companies face every day in tracking and managing their most valuable resources. AboutTime was built to solve the complex business problems that ERP, accounting, HR and other software solutions do not. 

“Experience matters to our customers.”

AboutTime has enjoyed great success and will continue to succeed for many more future customers as the leading on premise, enterprise resource management solution. Remember the time before mobile was “cool”. Surprisingly, it wasn’t that long ago. AboutTime was doing “mobile data collection” before the term existed and long before Apple iPhones, iPads and Android mobile devices existed. We were helping companies capture accurate mobile and remote data before BlackBerry was crowned (then later dethroned) the “king” of mobility. You’ve got to go all the way back to the PALM Pilot and Pocket PC days to get to the core of our resource management experience. AboutTime has always been and will continue to be an innovator and leader in on premise resource management.

So why WorkMax now? 

Innovation and the desire to get better is ultimately the driving force for our amazing team. We thrive on leading the way in helping our customers work smarter and get better. The concept for the WorkMax platform went like this: “Let’s start with what we know is true, what we’ve learned from many years in the industry and let’s give our customers exactly what they really want. Let’s do it in a flexible way that exceeds customer expectations. Let’s make WorkMax flexible, beautiful and affordable. Let’s change the game for how businesses manage their mobile, remote and local resources.”

What we now know is true:

Over the years we have talked to thousands of businesses in dozens of industries and we know every one of those business has challenges tracking and managing mobile, remote and local resources. Consistent findings are:

  1. Today’s businesses want a better, smarter way to track TIME, ASSETS, FORMS, FIELD SERVICE, but they all need different user configurations – flexible modules. 
  2. Although each business is unique; their resource management challenges are NOT unique to the industry they serve, the size of the business or the services provided by the business.
  3. Today’s businesses believe simple technology improves efficiency in business. Additionally we now know web-based solution benefits can outperform traditional on premise software. Internet speeds, data security and web infrastructure now affords best-of-breed web-based solutions to be not only A choice, but the PREFERRED choice for many of today’s decision makers. 

What we know matters to our customers.

EVERYONE is getting better, including your competitors. Technology is helping people work smarter and helping companies get more accurate data, faster. Everyone is becoming more efficient with their resources and your customers are learning (and being taught) to expect it. We are all in business for the customer, the WorkMax platform is built to help your team eliminate waste, increase automation, improve company efficiencies and most of all… to better serve your customers.

Can we help your business work smarter and get better?

I think we can. Every business is different and only you can determine if WorkMax or AboutTime is a good fit for YOUR business. I am confident you will know it when you see it. We realize we won’t be everything to everyone as there are many good technology solutions out there and then there are some very stubborn companies that just fear change.

“If you don’t like change you will like irrelevance even less.”  

How will we define WorkMax success?

We believe WorkMax will surpass your expectations, the platform is truly flexible, scalable and affordable. Implementation is incredibly rapid. We have made it very easy to try WorkMax in your business and customers should see great results within days. Our incredible team has invested enormous amounts of time, attention to detail and expertise into delivering one complete platform of modern resource management modules. So how will we know we’ve hit a home run with the WorkMax? When our customers tell us so.

Welcome to Modern Resource Management. Welcome to WorkMax.