Reaping the Benefits of Mentorship and Coaching in Construction

Apprenticeships have been a staple in construction for thousands of years. To this day, the benefits of mentorship and coaching are apparent, but at the same time, they’re becoming more challenging to pull off. Why? People get stuck in the busyness trap and delay, delay, delay. But like all relationships, mentors and coaches require time and commitment to grow and flourish. With the fourth quarter kicking off and New Year around the corner, there’s no better time to prioritize mentorship and coaching. 

To learn more, host Mike Merrill welcomes Angela Highland to this episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast. Angela is a project manager at Ironrock Commercial Construction, a Florida-based commercial construction company specializing in pre-engineered metal building erection and cast-in-place concrete. She is also a mentor and coach at Call to Action Coaching and Consulting and the host of Build. Lead. Succeed,  the official podcast of North America Women in Construction (NAWIC). During their chat, Angela explains the benefits of having mentorship and coaching programs in your business, and how having a mentor or coach can help you reach personal and professional goals.  

 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Mentor and coaching programs cost less than you think. Large construction firms understand the long-term value of coaching and mentorship and typically have these programs implemented already. These initiatives are affordable and smaller firms would benefit greatly from the knowledge and growth these programs provide to their employees.
  2. Match your mentors to your goals. Whether you pick one mentor or multiple mentors, make sure you focus on your goals with no more than one mentor per goal. Focusing on a single goal with multiple mentors can be overwhelming and might cause friction if multiple voices are involved in this process. 
  3. Mentorship fills in training gaps in your workforce. No one in your workforce knows everything. For example, after receiving a promotion from a craftsman to a supervisor, a new leader can turn to a coach to help lead and guide them in their new role. Linking a new leader with an experienced leader for coaching shortens the onboarding process and helps avoid inevitable mistakes.

 

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Episode Transcript

Mike Merrill:

Hello, and welcome to the Mobile Workforce Podcast, sponsored by AboutTime Technologies and WorkMax. I’m your host, Mike Merrill. And today we have Angela Highland on, as a guest.

Mike Merrill:

Angela is a Project Manager at Ironrock Commercial Construction, and also a mentor and coach at Call to Action Coaching & Consulting. She’s also the host of the Build. Lead. Succeed. Podcast, which is the official podcast of the North American Women in Construction or NAWIC. So, we love NAWIC, and we love supporting them. And we’re grateful to be affiliated with you, and have you on today.

Angela Highland:

Thank you so much, Mike. It’s a pleasure being here.

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. Well, I guess, first of all, I know this maybe wasn’t in the points we discussed, but what got you in construction originally? I’m super curious.

Angela Highland:

Quite by accident. I had some turns doing some business management over a number of years, and decided I wanted to venture out as a consultant. This was about 20 years ago. And ended up with a small commercial sign manufacturer, helping them out. And about that time, their main administrator left, and they needed a lot of help. And he asked me if I would consider staying on. And being new to the consulting world, not really understanding how it really works, I said, “I think I’d like to go back to that regular paycheck.”

Angela Highland:

So I went and helped him, and ended up several months later becoming a Project Manager. And he did all commercial signage, architectural stuff. And while I was there, I would get calls about other specialties, because signage is in the Specialties Division. And I asked him once, “Why do people keep asking for this? Why are they calling a sign company?” And he explained to me how it works with the different divisions. And he said, “You’d be really good. You could have your own business as a subcontractor. You could get the WBE certifications, and you could probably branch out.”

Angela Highland:

So I looked into it and did a little research. And about six months later, I opened my own subcontracting company. And here I am, 18 years later.

Mike Merrill:

Wow. The rest is in the history books, right?

Angela Highland:

The rest is history.

Mike Merrill:

Well, congratulations. That’s a really cool backstory. And I think it’s super awesome that you’ve been able to succeed and continue to build these dreams that you’ve had. Whatever they’ve been, they’ve led you to where you are. And you’re doing a phenomenal job of making a big impact, not only on NAWIC, but within the industry too. So thank you for the work that you’re doing.

Angela Highland:

I enjoy the industry. Like I said, I fell in by accident, but it’s become an industry that I love. And I enjoy it.

Mike Merrill:

That’s great. So what’s a piece of advice that you might give to somebody else that maybe is on the front end of a journey like this, or considering something like that? Is there any advice you’d give to them, as a mentor or a coach?

Angela Highland:

I would recommend that they try to find a support network. That has been really big for me. I was quietly sitting at my desk for many, many years, plugging away, growing a business, and really did need to tap into a different kind of a network. I felt a little isolated, but I was just running my company the way I know how to run companies. And once I tapped into a support network, though, everything changed. It opened me up a lot. It helped me understand that I knew more than I thought, but I also was able to find mentors that I needed to help me go to the next level.

Mike Merrill:

Oh, that’s great. I love that. So tell me this. I know the terms can be used loosely at times, who a mentor or a coach. What are the difference between the two, as you see it?

Angela Highland:

To me, a mentor is someone that guides. They listen to you and what you talk about. And then, they give advice back based on their experiences and their knowledge and their skillset. A coach is specifically trained in how to help you find the answers for yourself. So not everybody knows what those answers are, but through asking questions, listening to what your goals are, then we can find what you’re looking for. And then a coach can help you come to your own answers.

Mike Merrill:

Oh, I love that. Yeah. I mean, they say often, the coach is basically on the sideline. So the game is what happens between the lines. And I love that you’re bringing that point up that a good coach will allow someone to make their own decisions and kind of help them along the way.

Angela Highland:

Absolutely.

Mike Merrill:

So is there a stigmatism in construction or is there hesitancy that you see for companies to seek out mentors or coaches in their business practices?

Angela Highland:

So I’ve got a little of a different perspective on this because I’ve been a business owner, I’ve worked on the subcontracting side, and of course, now I work on the general contracting side, because I sold my company back in 2017. And then, went off into the coaching realm, did all the training. And of course, COVID kind of brought that to a close. So I’m back into construction, which is great. And through the power of my relationships, I was able to get on the GC side, which is a way different thing, but enjoying that just the same. But my point is is that I feel like I’ve got a good perspective here. A lot of companies, smaller companies especially, they don’t seek out mentoring or coaching programs for their employees. I see a lot of the bigger GCs are doing that. Sometimes they have those programs in-house because they’ve seen the value that it brings to the table.

Mike Merrill:

Well, that’s great. That’s a great insight. And I think for those of you that are smaller organizations listening, I know that we would both highly encourage you, both Angela and I, to seek out those mentors. Tiger Woods had a swing coach. Michael Jordan has a shooting coach. It doesn’t matter who you are or how great you are at your craft or your skill, that third party perspective is certainly something that we could all use more of.

Angela Highland:

I agree. And there is surprisingly very affordable ways to go about that. Doing a mentoring program in-house is very easy to do. And you can do that when you are a very small company. Coaching, you can find a coach that will come in and help with personal and professional development for your staff. They could come in one day a week, or two days a week. And a lot of companies are surprised when they find out it’s not going to cost them. I have a million a year to bring in a professional.

Mike Merrill:

Right. I actually really love one of the points you just made. You said, “Personally, not just professionally.” So how important is that personal side in mentoring or coaching?

Angela Highland:

Oh, it’s huge because there’s an overlap, right? How we feel on the inside is how we’re going to act on the outside. And that is at home and at work. I mean, how many times do you see people bringing their personal lives into work, and it affects the job that they do every day?

Mike Merrill:

We’re human.

Angela Highland:

We absolutely are human. And if you are out of control, if you’re emotionally out of control, or you are not an organized person, or there’s something holding you back from going out and charging forward in your career, or even just to make the duties of your job be successful, that’s a problem, right? So if you start with people personally and professionally, you can affect people on both sides of the coin.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Great advice as well. So as a woman in construction, and someone who is a mentor and a coach, I’m curious, do you face hurdles because you’re a woman? Do you feel like that becomes a problem or a challenge at times?

Angela Highland:

It can be. I have not had a lot of problems with it. I’ve experienced a little bit in this past few months, because being a project manager on a job site, sometimes men may not necessarily want to take direction from a woman. There could be a little bit of weirdness there. But I’m built a little differently in that I love to have communication. And if I see somebody’s having an issue, I have no problem going and talking to them about it, and trying to figure out how we can come to a resolution.

Angela Highland:

I think there’s always room for mentoring and coaching on the job. Each one of us every day, can mentor each other without being an official mentor. We can also coach each other.

Angela Highland:

I’ll give a small example. I have a new superintendent on my job site. And he started out as a mason. And he just showed a lot of skill just in construction in general, so we made him a superintendent. He came out. He was doing a good job. He’s great with the other trades. He’s great with the owner. He represents the company very well. But he’s feeling a little unsure of himself. He knows way more than he thinks that he does. And he gets a little emotional and a little passionate in certain situations, if he feels like there’s another man on the job site that’s questioning him. He may not necessarily like that. And there’s been a couple of times where I’ve had to pull him to the side and say, “You’re the leader here. You’re the point man. You set the example. If you’re going to get triggered into an argument, more than an argument, a fight, that’s not good, that doesn’t set a good example.” And I said, “So just take a deep breath. If you’ve got to walk away, then walk away. That’s the best thing to do.”

Angela Highland:

And it really helped him. And he came back to me a couple of weeks later and he thanked me. He’s like, “Thank you, because now when I feel myself getting frustrated, I just walk away. I tell him, ‘I’ll be back in a few minutes,’ and I go away, and I walk around. And I’m able to come back with a cool head and a clear line of thinking and a better solution overall.” And I think those are things we can all do for each other naturally.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. What a great example. I love that. I know obviously you’re a skilled mentor because probably your communication skills are paramount in allowing you to do that. But what does somebody do to make sure that they find the right mentor for them?

Angela Highland:

Well, I think there’s a couple of different things. First, you’ve got to get out there and meet people. If you’re doing it within your own company, you really do have to become very social. You got to get to know people and get to know them and ask questions, because that’s the only way that you’re going to be able to figure out if that’s a good person for you, right? So, that’s one way.

Angela Highland:

Another thing is that if you’re working with somebody that you really admire and you just click with and you just think that they’ve got something to offer, go talk to them because people love to be needed. So if you walk up to somebody in your office or out on the job site and say, “I’m really struggling with this. And I noticed that this is easy for you, or you seem to handle this really well. Can you help me with that?” And sometimes it’s all you have to do is ask for help. That’s a big one.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. What I’m hearing you say is we need to be a little bit more vulnerable.

Angela Highland:

I think absolutely. And in construction, that’s not always top of mind.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. It’s hard for most men too, for sure.

Angela Highland:

True. Absolutely. But I’ve seen a lot of good things come from especially the younger tradesmen that are coming in to talk to some of the older tradesmen, because they have such a wealth of knowledge. We all know that things are way different in the trades right now. We’ve got an aging workforce that’s going to be retiring out, and we don’t have enough people to fill those positions. So anything that we can do with the younger workforce to help them kind of move forward, not just in their skill, their hard skill, but also that soft skill. Very important.

Mike Merrill:

So as somebody who’s looking to be mentored or to be a mentee, what are some tips or things that they should focus on to make sure that they’re really absorbing, what’s being shared and able to move forward with change?

Angela Highland:

Listening is key. You have to be able to listen to understand, right? Not to respond, as they say. And really take in what this person is telling you. Even if you might not agree with it, still listen to them and see where they’re going, because there may be a lesson they’re trying to tell you, or a key point that you could pick up on.

Angela Highland:

I think another thing to do is to sit down and make a goal sheet. So I’ve created mentoring programs for companies. I created a mentoring program that the National Association of Women in Construction uses. And we start with just a goal-setting sheet. Some personal goals, but professional goals. And it doesn’t always have to be about a big, “Well, I want to make a hundred thousand dollars a year. Or I want to reach this position.” Sometimes it can be more on that soft skill side of, “I would like to learn how to get along better on the job site or communicate better on the job site.” Something like that. So I think those are very important. Goals are huge.

Mike Merrill:

So I know in my business, we have meetings like most companies. And some meetings are really long, and some meetings are really short. And sometimes, a really short meeting seemed to be a lot more impactful. We get in, we communicate what needs to be done. There’s expectations and accountability. You’ve got deliverables. And you actually remember what you’re supposed to be doing, and you can just go forward. Where does something like that come into play when it comes to working with a mentor in their valuable time? They have a limited amount of time. Our boss is paying for their time. And then we also have a job to do, so we really need to get back to being productive. So what advice would you give in making sure as a mentee or someone who’s being mentored, that they’re able to actually take full advantage of that opportunity to change and improve?

Angela Highland:

I think going in prepared is really important. I think if you’ve got a piece of paper and you guys work through what your top three goals are, is a nice way to start. When I first was creating the mentoring program that I use, it was trial and error with my mentee. But I just went in with a piece of paper and said, “What are the three goals that you would like to tackle within this next six months?” And she came back, and we discussed it a little bit when we wrote them down, we whittled it down to something nice and achievable. And then every month, we would meet and we would go back to that sheet of paper. And it helped us stay on track and not go off into these tangents, and set milestones in place. “Okay. Well, what are you going to do this month to achieve that milestone?” And then maybe come up with three answers for that.

Angela Highland:

So we just kept going back to the goals, because it is nice to have the conversation and tell the stories because it helps us all learn about each other and understand where we’re at. But you’re right. We’re all busy people. So if you have something to focus on, and you can track it and not forget month to month what you’ve been talking about or what you’ve been working on, I really believe that you can achieve the smaller goals that help you lead to the bigger goals.

Mike Merrill:

So do you see a need at times for multiple mentors or coaches?

Angela Highland:

I think that depends on the mentee. It depends on what they have going on. Some people just have one specific goal. And so one mentor is good, or one coach is good. But sometimes I’ve seen people that have other things. For example, in the mentoring program, we had a girl that wanted to get better at time management, but she also wanted to be able to speak in front of a group. And so she got two because one person wasn’t necessarily good at both. And she liked that because it helped her get the different perspectives as well.

Mike Merrill:

I love that. Well, and each of them would be very keenly focused on that piece. And so she probably got a little more specific attention to both.

Angela Highland:

Yeah. If you’re lucky enough to find somebody that can help you with both of those, that’s great. But not everybody can do everything.

Mike Merrill:

So it sounds almost like that was… Was that a NAWIC program or was that a local chapter or national? Where did that come from?

Angela Highland:

That was a local. So when I came on with NAWIC back in 2012, they didn’t really have a professional development program or a mentoring program. And they were really wanting to find ways to add value so that they could gain more members. And they realized that professional development really was the way to go.

Angela Highland:

And one of the national officers happened to be talking to me at a conference. I was kind of a new member and she said, “So what do you think about our little organization here?” And I said, “Well, it’s not little.” I said, “But I love it. I’ve found my people. This is great. It’s women in construction. I’ve got the support network now. I’ve got business opportunity, professional contacts.”

Angela Highland:

And she said, “So do you have women at your job?” And I said, “Well, yes, I do. I have four women that work for me.” And she said, “Are they members?” I said, “No, they’re not.” And she said, “Why not?” And I said, “Well, because as a business owner, I’m not sure what value it would bring to them. As a business owner, I was finding value.”

Angela Highland:

And she said, “Well, what would give you that?” And I said, “Well, professional development so that they could learn and be better.” And so they asked me if I would help them build that, because I was talking about ideas. So I help them create that. And then the mentoring program came along. And the Orlando chapter, which is the largest in the country, since I was incoming president at that time, I went to the current president and said, “I’d really like to start a mentoring program in this chapter. And let’s vet it out. Let’s make sure it’s going to work. And then, let’s tell everybody nationwide, over 120 chapters, and maybe they’ll pick up on it. I really saw that that would be a great way to really move a lot of women forward in the industry.”

Angela Highland:

And so she said, “Okay.” And that’s what we did. And it was a success. And I happened to get a great young lady, that I worked with, that met every single one of her goals in six months. So I felt rather successful about that. But what’s interesting is I learned just as much as she did. It was a two way street. And mentoring should be a two way street.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. They say, if you really want to learn something or become really knowledgeable about it, you should teach it. So I could see why that would make sense.

Angela Highland:

Yeah, absolutely.

Mike Merrill:

So what can our listeners do for their organizations, whether they’re a business owner or they’re part of the staff of the company, to create and foster this company culture of mentorship?

Angela Highland:

There are a number of resources out there in the interwebs, that you can tap into, that would help you start an in-house mentoring program very easily. I’m glad to be a resource for anyone that needs that as well. Sometimes it’s just sitting everybody down and saying, “Who would like a little help? And who’s got skills in this area?” And then you pair them up, and you let them go. And then maybe you check back in every 90 days to see how it’s going. And then after six months, maybe you bring it to a close and start the cycle all over again. So, that’s one really easy way. There’s also some softwares out there for bigger companies that can do mentor programs. So, whether you go in-house or out of house, there’s definitely resources.

Mike Merrill:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So obviously, NAWIC has a program for this, and you’ve been a big part of rolling that out. And it sounds like it’s going really well, which is fantastic. I love hearing that.

Mike Merrill:

What about men that work for these organizations? Can they be a part and participate in some of these NAWIC programs with their team?

Angela Highland:

Absolutely. I think just you have to seek out your local chapter. Not every chapter is doing the mentoring program because each one has its own board of directors, and they kind of do their own thing in their chapter, under the national guidelines, of course. But there’s always room for that. A lot of times we have our regional conferences, we have our national conference, men are always invited to come. We don’t bar the door or anything like that. And I think it’s important to do because I think men should be part of the conversation. I really do. Like the podcast that I do, I don’t think it’s only for women. I think it’s for women in construction and the men in the industry that support them, because there’s a lot of men that are very supportive of women. And because they see that it’s not about if you’re a man or a woman, it’s the right person for the job. How do we help everybody get forward?

Mike Merrill:

Oh, I love that. I just keep thinking back to the communication point that you made earlier. It’s all about the communication. And we need to learn to communicate, men and women alike and together. And we all have the same goal in a company, right? We’re all working towards the same destination, hopefully. And I love what you’re doing to help bring those talents to the industry that maybe have been lacking in the past.

Angela Highland:

Yes, I’ve spent a lot of time on the coaching side. A lot of the training that I went through was to have an awareness of different personality types. I got certified in DiSC and a couple of other things, because to me, that’s where you start. If I can understand you and what you’re bringing to the table, then I can find some middle ground where you and I can communicate, right? Because you have those people that you work with, that just rub you the wrong way, or you just never can see eye to eye. But if you suddenly have a tool that makes you aware, okay, this is an A-type personality, and I know how this person is. If I can come at them from a different angle that helps us communicate better, you can just get a lot more done. So you’re right. The only way to do that is through communicating and getting to know people.

Mike Merrill:

I love that. That sounds like a whole other podcast episode, we need to have you back on to discuss. I really think that would be very valued. I mean, I can think even in my personal life, we’re always dealing with and working with and around people. And collaboration and cooperation are just a blessing when they can occur. And sometimes we get in the way of that, I think.

Angela Highland:

Yeah, you’re absolutely right. I had to do last… Well, before COVID, I got the opportunity to work with a concrete company who was looking for somebody to come in and help their concrete leads with a little bit of leadership. And so I went in with my DiSC assessments, and have them do this whole thing. And I walk into this room. And these guys, you could tell it was the last place they wanted to be like, “Why am I in here with this lady for the next six weeks? I don’t even want to do this.” And I think they were pleasantly surprised at what they learned. And we made them interact with each other, so they got to see that they really did have a skill working together as a team. And if they just tweaked things a little bit and understood each other, that they would work even better together.

Angela Highland:

And by the end of the six weeks, they all said they felt like they could identify behaviors on their teams. And they felt they were better equipped to go out and listen and interact with their teams. And let me tell you, as a coach, that was huge for me. I felt like it was a big win, that you were able to make that kind of a breakthrough.

Angela Highland:

And we ended up going back because I wanted to see how they interacted with their team. So we did an undercover construction day. I dressed up with just grubbies and went out, like I was some temporary project manager on the site. And I was able to observe them in the field. And it was really impressive. It was working what they were doing. So I think that awareness, the communication, and just getting people to open up, that can be hugely beneficial.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, that’s cool. Sounds like a little Undercover Boss episode going on.

Angela Highland:

I had so much fun. They didn’t even know what to do. And they were looking at me like, “What is she doing here?” Because nobody knew except these three guys, because through the training, I was in the front office. So nobody in and out, in the plant, even knew I was there. So it was a lot of fun. I would love to do more of that. That was amazing.

Mike Merrill:

That’s a good idea. I like that. So, is there some training available or how does a mentor learn to be a good mentor? I mean, there’s people that have natural talents and abilities, of course, and maybe they’re good communicators, but how do they get structure to help other people through mentoring?

Angela Highland:

Well, they can always reach out to me. They can email me. And I’m glad to share my resources, because it literally takes 15 minutes to give people the tools. These are tools that I have, that I don’t charge people for, because I think mentoring should be free and for everyone. And anything that I can do to support other people in that journey is hugely important to me. So they can always reach out.

Angela Highland:

And I’m glad to get on a Zoom with all this great technology we have now. Since COVID, it’s the big silver lining, right? So, I’m glad to jump on a Zoom call with a bunch of people and walk them through it and even tell them how to go about it. Literally, the first time I did it, it was like being back in elementary school with a tri-fold foam board with pictures on it. And people love that. It’s very tangible to them. So yeah, glad to help.

Mike Merrill:

And that’s very cool. Well, I appreciate that offer and I hope that some listeners will take you up on that. I’m very intrigued with what materials you must have. I’m sure there’s a great need out there for companies to take advantage of that opportunity.

Angela Highland:

Absolutely.

Mike Merrill:

So lastly, I do want to ask, what’s the number one takeaway that you would have the listeners leave this podcast with today?

Angela Highland:

The number one takeaway is that you always have resources. You just have to seek them out and you have to advocate for yourself. If there’s something that you want, whether in your career, whether personally, anything, if you don’t know how to get it, you are the only one that can go seek that out. Nobody’s going to come and find you. People just sit back and wait. And you might get lucky, but the chances are, you’re just going to be sitting and waiting for a long time. So I always encourage people to go after what they want, and if it’s even just to have a conversation with somebody to get it started. So, that’s what I would say. You have to go ask for what you want.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, be a little brave, it sounds like, for just a minute.

Angela Highland:

Yeah. Just a little bit. Yeah. Once you do it, it gets easier every time.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And you realize, “Why did I wait so long to do that? That really wasn’t that hard.”

Angela Highland:

Right. You just got to jump over that puddle. And suddenly, you don’t mind if your shoes get a little wet, and then you don’t even think about it anymore. And what I have found also is once people start asking, when you get to some goal-setting, it becomes easier for them, because they realize that it doesn’t have to be this big, giant thing. It can just be a baby step. And now they’ve advocated for themselves, and that didn’t hurt so bad. So maybe now I can go ahead and get this little thing. And wow, okay, I achieved that. And then you get that confidence. And now, you’re ready to tackle bigger and bigger things. And suddenly, you’re conquering the world.

Mike Merrill:

It sounds like progress to me.

Angela Highland:

Yeah, absolutely.

Mike Merrill:

Great. Well, so last couple things, just wanted to ask you, what’s one thing, Angela, that you are grateful for in your professional life?

Angela Highland:

Opportunity. I think every woman in America should be grateful every day for the country that they live in, because there are so many places out there that you don’t get the opportunity that you get here. And I think that that’s worth saying, because we take it for granted. We forget that we can step out, we can go jump on a job site, we can own our own companies, we can start our own coaching practices, and nobody’s there to put you back down. It really is all up to you. And I’m so grateful that I have those opportunities that I can go out there and do those things. And that I can fail, and that I can get back up and try again. And nobody holds it against me.

Mike Merrill:

Great point. It’s okay to fail, right?

Angela Highland:

Absolutely, it is. A hundred percent.

Mike Merrill:

I heard someone say, “Fail faster”, right? And then you can get to success sooner, right?

Angela Highland:

Yeah. Fail forward. That’s how you learn.

Mike Merrill:

I love that. All right, very last thing. So what is Angela Highland’s superpower? Just pick one. We don’t need 10. I’m sure you’ve got 10.

Angela Highland:

I don’t have 10, but it’s very hard for me to think about that. I think my superpower is I’m very good at making you believe that you can do anything you want to do. And I’m willing to do whatever it is to help you get there. And I think any of my acquaintances, my friends, my coworkers, I can confidently say that they would agree with that, because I’m always trying to see how I can help people. I’m a teacher at heart, I think. I think that’s an archetype that I have. And I really do just want for people to live their best lives on their terms. And anything I can do, I will push them from behind. I have no problem doing that.

Mike Merrill:

Oh, that’s fantastic. Well, NAWIC is fortunate to have you. I can see why you’re heavily involved. And I know why they are grateful that you are.

Angela Highland:

I love NAWIC. It’s been a powerful force in my life. And so for me, it’s giving back. It’s an all voluntary association. And I continue to stay involved because I do care and I’ve been bitten by the bug. So if I can help support other women in their careers, then I want to do that.

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. Well, thank you again. Thank you for joining us today. This was such a fun conversation and very insightful.

Angela Highland:

Thank you so much. It’s been a pleasure. And I’m glad to come back and have more conversations.

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, look forward to that. We’re going to hold you to that. We’ve got it recorded now, so you can’t wiggle out of it.

Angela Highland:

That’s what I said. Thank you so much. This was great.

Mike Merrill:

Absolutely. And thank you to the guests for listening to the Mobile Workforce Podcast today. We’re so grateful that you joined us, and we appreciate your involvement and your feedback. We love those ratings and reviews as well, of course. If you enjoyed what Angela and I had to discuss today and some of the things that we were able to talk through, and hopefully spur some ideas for you in mentoring and receiving coaching in your organization, having better communication, we encourage you to please share this episode with your colleagues and friends in the industry. After all, just like Angela stated so well, our goal is to not only help you improve your business, but your life.