Construction Technology: Pivotal Differentiator for Clients

As the use of construction technology surges across the industry, an unexpected group is expressing interest in how it works: prospective clients. Current customers and prospective clients understand that technology is valuable for businesses in general. But lately, more and more are beginning to understand how a business’ technology (or lack of) can benefit (or hinder) their projects. Whether it’s gaining visibility into budgets or timelines, or receiving updates from the field in real-time, prospective clients are asking construction firms what kinds of technology they utilize and are increasingly choosing contractors based on their answers.

In this episode, Mike Gillum, a product specialist at Acumatica, reveals which technologies are attracting clients today and explains why every contractor should be implementing these solutions in 2021 and beyond. 

 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Contractors should select technology that enhances their productivity. The right tech solutions can boost your team’s productivity by eliminating unnecessary work, increasing communication and reporting. Clients want work that’s completed on time and within budget and are increasingly selecting contractors who leverage tech to do so, even if their proposal is not the lowest quoted cost. 
  2. Prioritize technology that keeps clients in the loop. In 2020 and into 2021, it hasn’t been feasible for most clients to visit job sites to track progress and share feedback. That’s why real-time tracking solutions are so valuable –– they allow contractors to report on a project’s progress with videos, pictures and data. Clients can receive these details quickly from wherever they are, so they always stay in the know.  
  3. Tech that increases safety, reliability and accuracy gives clients the security they need. The best construction managers are risk managers. Technology solutions like safety forms and labor tracking allows project managers to instantly respond to situations that arise on the job site, minimizing any loss of time, money or injury. By effectively managing risk, the contractor can eliminate issues before they take place.

 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to the mobile workforce podcast. I’m your host, Mike Merrill, and today we are sitting down with Mike Gillum, the product specialist at Acumatica. Sorry, let me start that over again. All right. Hello and welcome to the mobile workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill, and today we are sitting down with Mike Gillum, the product specialist at Acumatica Construction. With Mike’s experience working with contractors for over 20 years, we just wanted to have a nice conversation and talk about and learn some of the unique insights that he’s had from his various positions. So, Mike, welcome and thank you. We’re glad you were able to join us today.

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, absolutely, Mike. Thanks for having me. I’ve been looking forward to this. I know we had to reschedule once, but due to opportunities, but happy to be here absolutely.

 

Mike Merrill:

Never a better reason to postpone then bringing in the bacon.

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s it. Exactly.

 

Mike Merrill:

So before we jump into the conversations today, why don’t you share with the listeners just a little bit about your background on your experience?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, definitely. So I have about 25 years of experience in the automated construction software space. My father was a contractor growing up, so I’ve been in construction my entire life. He was a sheet metal contractor. So I spent a lot of time climbing up ladders and commercial buildings, hauling buckets of whatever I needed to haul as long as I was strong enough, or when I was strong enough to do that, and then spent some time estimating and doing some PM-ing for him as well.

So once I got through college, ended up coming down to Florida where I’m based now and got hired by the Construction Estimating Institute of America, which is still around today, still exists. They were putting together programs for licensing for general contractors. They did programs around estimating and project management from an education perspective for contract, something that was missing in the Florida market.

So they hired me on and had some time doing some technical support for them and some consulting. Then they ended up purchasing a software company called Tech Sonics, which is a old DOS-based product out of San Diego, California. They ended up converting that into two other DOS-based products, which eventually became Quest Solutions. Quest Solutions was a takeoff an estimating product. I was a partner in that company and we ended up selling that to Maxwell Systems in 2008.

So I converted from Quest over to Maxwell, worked there for a number of years, and then Maxwell was acquired by Viewpoint. So I worked for Viewpoint for a couple of years and then did some consulting on my own and ended up here at Acumatica. We’re quite excited to be here, and it’s been a fun couple of years disrupting the construction space for sure.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Quite a background.

 

Mike Gillum:

Quite a background. Yeah. You could say I’ve been through the acquisition pipeline once or twice for sure. Learned a lot there. No doubt about it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. One act short of a circus it sounds like so far.

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s about right. Yeah. Yeah. It seems to be the state of affairs for technology. Right? There’s always movers and shakers, and things happening and merging and acquiring, et cetera.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Lots of shakeups, but it’s good. I think that unique perspective that you gained through those different experiences you’ve had certainly add value to the things that you can bring to the table for your customers.

 

Mike Gillum:

Definitely. Yeah, absolutely.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, so one of the most important tools as we’ve talked previous to this podcast, is software in construction. So when you hear a statement like that, that the software is the most important tool or one of the most important tools, what comes to mind for you?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, that’s a great question. In reality, it’s contractors today typically utilize too much software. I don’t know if you’ve heard that before or not, but in your experience, in my experience certainly, when I’m talking to contractors to run their business today they may be using upwards of six or seven different products. Oftentimes those products are disparate. Meaning they’re not talking to one another, right? There’s no integration, or if there is, it’s a manual import and an export, and they’re throwing things over the fence. The folks out in the field they’re doing their work in the field and they throw it over the wall or the fence to the accounting people, then they do their thing, and maybe a week later the data comes back together.

So that’s one of the things that definitely comes to mind as an issue today with contractors that we’re trying to help solve for. I know you’re trying to help solve for as well is bringing that all together and having data speaking to each other. So it’s all about real-time information. If contractors are able to access real-time information, they can make those important decisions around profitability on a project, or change orders, or any aspect of the project that’s out there.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s very interesting. I’ve heard that comment on occasion. I don’t hear it a whole lot, but I have heard it for sure. So when you say too much software, do you mean they got 15 different Phillips screwdrivers that are all about the same size? Expand on that, could you?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, so they could be using… Let’s say they’re using product A to do their takeoff, and then they’re using perhaps an Excel spreadsheet or an automated system to do their estimating and bidding, or even they’re using a separate bidding tool. Then they may have two or three different apps that they’re using for project management or time capturing. Then you’ve got your accounting software. If they’re using an older accounting software that is perhaps legacy based or server based, that’s not speaking to the latest and greatest technology that’s out there from a cloud perspective, or a mobile application perspective.

So when I say too much software it’s, they’ve gone out and perhaps fixed a problem for a group of people in their organization, whether that’s the superintendents or project managers, or the estimators, or the accounting people, the AP or AR people, but they haven’t thought about the big picture of bringing all those people together. They’re one team and with the same set of information that they’re all working with, that would help make decision-making a lot easier and understanding exactly where they are with their projects, but also the company as a whole.

 

Mike Merrill:

So I’m hearing integration in any system they have as the key to utilizing and leveraging.

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. And integration is a term that’s often overused or misspoke about, right? It’s really the ability to gather data in one central location and have players in your company and outside of your company, both internal and external, accessing that information. So everybody’s working with the same set of data, not having to wait a week or two weeks for the PM to come in from the field, or the accounting team to go through their approval processes, or a bill to get paid. With real time information in one central location, that’s going to allow everyone to have that timely information to make those important decisions.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. You stated something there. You talked about people outside of the organization. So that’s kind of an interesting point. What types of data might be shared with external people from the company?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. So if you think about a construction project from a pre-construction side, all the way through the installation or implementation of the project, and then after the project once it’s completed, there’s a whole lot of players involved there. If we start on the front side, you’ve got the architects and engineers that need to be speaking to the contractor or the owner, depending on what type of project it is. You’ve got the owner of the client, you’ve got the architects and engineers, then you have the general contractor, and then you have a whole slew of subcontractors. Again, depending on the size and scope of the project.

All at the same time, you have the vendors. People that are supplying materials or supplying services to the project or to the sub or to the general contractor. So those are the kinds of folks I mean when I say external, and they’re just as important to the whole project as somebody within your own organization. So again, having them, or providing them the ability to have access to the right information, whether it’s a change in scope, or blueprints, or specs, something has changed, there’s been a revision, getting that out to the subcontractor in a timely manner impacts the whole project. From a scheduling perspective or a job costing perspective.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So that’s a great point. So you brought up something there too. We talked previously about the challenges with data lags on the job site. Is that where some of those things break down and occur?

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s definitely where some of those things break down and occur. If something happens with a subcontractor, perhaps it’s the MEP contractor, and something changed in the plans with the architect or engineer made a change, and the revision came in. If the general contractor doesn’t get that out to the subcontractor, perhaps the subcontractor’s already done the work and it was the wrong work, or they didn’t realize there was some kind of collision there where this wall wasn’t supposed to be there, or that pipes running through where my wiring is supposed to go type of thing. So having that information all in one place for everybody to access is extremely important.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. When you’ve got those collisions, you’ve got lost opportunity of time, wasted materials, other delays that are impacted. So-

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. And it all impacts the schedule, right? As you’re well aware, contractors are on a tight schedule to get their projects finished in a timely manner. Oftentimes we’ll get paid upfront, or if they finish early, they’ll make a little bonus on that project from a profitability perspective. So scheduling is extremely important. And if you’ve got a sub contractor that’s supposed to be out there on Monday and they come out and realize, well, they can’t do the work until Wednesday or Friday. Well, that subcontractor is going to go to their next project, and you might not be able to get them back for two weeks.

Where I am in Florida right now, and I think other places as well, construction is booming. Whether it’s infrastructure work or residential, multifamily. I mean, it’s everywhere. Trying to find a contractor to come paint a house or a building, or put flooring down is weeks or months in advance right now. So scheduling is extremely important.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, that’s a great point. So I guess one of the ways to combat that, and technology is kind of provided some answers in this area, but there’s things like machine learning and robotics, sensors, other things that are part of the conversation with technology and innovation these days and construction. What would you say to companies that feel like maybe those things are a threat to their job or their position? Do you hear that?

 

Mike Gillum:

It’s a great segue Mike. I think they should look at it in the opposite way. I think they should look at machine learning, AI, ML, robotics, all of that as a benefit to their organizations, because it’s only going to increase profitability on a project, increase awareness on a project and provide more timely insights. When you’re talking about those sensors, whether it’s a plumbing contractor, mechanical electrical contractor, where they’ve got sensors out on their job sites or projects where something goes wrong and someone can be instantly notified that something went wrong. So not only are you saving the client money, but you’re utilizing technology to fix the problem, to get your team out there a lot faster, whether it’s a service tech or even on a piece of heavy equipment.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So this makes me think of another thing you mentioned. Some companies have too many different software systems, too much data maybe, or in too many different places. How does machine learning help combat that and what are some of the benefits over just a standard process that somebody used manually?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. So machine learning is a really, really interesting concept as is artificial intelligence. It’s really all about understanding processes. Machine learning is going to… And there’s so many different ways where machine learning comes into play. I can give you a couple of different examples there, but if you’re from an accounting perspective, a financial perspective, if your invoices are always coming in a certain way, or perhaps they’re coming in different ways with different vendors, and you’ve got to, as an AP or AR clerk, manage that from a paper process, it can be a timely thing to have happen. You’ve got hours or days of every single day where you’re having to learn what those processes look like.

Where machine learning comes into play is, it’s going to automatically read those invoices or read that expense claim and understand from this particular vendor, every time they send it in, the date is here, the dollar amount is here, the tax and total is here and it’s going to go grab that information, and then plug that into the appropriate place within the software. So what it’s doing is, is learning your habits or it’s learning your vendor’s habits or your supplier’s habits, and understanding where that information is coming from, and then what to do with it.

To automatically create an expense claim, automatically capture that expense receipt with the name of the shop. Whether it was you went out and bought your crew lunch, or you had to run to the hardware store and buy a piece of something that you needed on the job site, it’s going to learn all of those things and automatically take that information for you and then create or automate that process.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, it is interesting, very fascinating to me. I mean, as a former contractor myself, when I think back, I can think of so many processes that would have been really nice to have those tools in place so you weren’t counting on someone to remember something, or manually fix or address an issue.

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. Then to take it further, if we start talking about machine learning or artificial intelligence on yellow iron, on big pieces of equipment. I’ve been on some job sites in the last year where there are no operators, where the equipment is running automatically. The blade on that dozer is going up and down based on information that came from the engineer, or came from the estimate, or the blueprints where it knows the grade for that particular area of the site. It’s just amazing technology. It’s coming along way. So back to your original question, I would suggest that people look at that with open eyes, with a perspective saying, “how can this help my business?” Not being afraid of it or not thinking that it’s going to take somebody’s job away. It’s actually going to increase the profit of your projects and overall for your company.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I mean, for some contractors, those terms can be scary, but I think of in a personal application at home I have the Nest thermostats on my furnace and a Nest doorbell and it notifies me on my phone when a package has been delivered or picked up or when a visitor’s there that I already know or I’m familiar with. So these tools are available in construction from what you’re saying, and there’s processes that can actually lead to greater profitability if we can-

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, that’s exactly right. I’m glad you made that comparison there to your home life. If we all look at our cell phones today and they’re more than just a cell phone. They’re a mini computer in our pocket and we rely on them so much from an application perspective, and an information perspective. If you’re used to using your cell phone and having ask Siri or ask whomever you’re asking Alexa or whatever device you’re using, to provide you information. That’s what these companies from a construction software perspective are offering. They’re providing that for your business in addition to what you are already are using at home, Alexa or Siri or whatever the device is, but having that in your business is only going to improve that.

Also another benefit of machine learning and artificial intelligence is that it’s going to attract more people to want to work for your organization. Some of the younger generation, they grew up with this technology. They grew up with iPads and iPhones and Android devices, where they had them when they were two years old and were whipping around on their computers. Now when they come out into the workforce, they’re expecting that technology to be where they want to go to work, and if it’s not, I think you’ll have a harder time hiring someone that has that background.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s a great point. I know I’ve had other guests on the podcast share similar sentiments that these kids coming out of school… They won’t know how to navigate these manual processes that some people are really addicted to today.

 

Mike Gillum:

No, they’ll look at us like we have three heads. It’s like, “What do you mean you’re not using machine learning?” Or, “What do you mean you’re not using a computer to do that or software to do that?” Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well-

 

Mike Gillum:

It’s kind of… Yeah. Sorry. It’s kind of the same concept of legacy based software, which did its job for decades, but now we’re moving out of that and into cloud-based software, and it’s the same concept when we’re talking about machine learning and AI. It’s new technology and what can it do to help my business?

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, yeah, like satellite technology and drone technology, and actually having an overview of the roof where the issue is, as opposed to getting up on a ladder, three stories up and risking safety possibly when maybe it’s not necessary to see what’s going on.

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s exactly right. Yeah. I’m sure you were part of the Procor ground break event and the ENR future tech event that happened in the last couple of months, and where they had robotic dogs on job sites walking around and making marcations on this concrete, and doing safety tours and issues through the project. What that’s doing is it’s taking that information, learning what that information, who needs that information, and then feeding that back to, whether it’s an ERP package or an estimating package or building information, BIM modeling design tool that it’s feeding that information. It’s just, it’s amazing what’s happening out there today. It’s pretty exciting.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. It is fascinating. So I guess on the other side of that, so there’s that side where there’s a lot of opportunities to take advantage of, but in the same bucket of the discussion you already mentioned with companies have too much software, too many tools, how does a company avoid getting in over their head on investing in these shiny new toys that seem cool, but then they don’t necessarily change if you don’t implement them properly?

 

Mike Gillum:

Right. Great question. So again, it’s like a kid walking into a candy store, into a toy store. What do I want versus what do I need? So I would suggest that you sit down with your executive team, the owners of the organization, understand what are we doing today for our processes? Count how many different software packages you’re utilizing today to perform your tasks. Each one of your teams, whether it’s the field and the office, or you’ll break that down even further with engineering, versus estimating, versus PM’s and superintendents. Understand exactly what you’re doing today, and have a game plan going into the future with what do we need today? How can we purchase something today that’s going to grow with us? There’s lots of opportunities out there where you may not need the big engine today, and you only need a small chunk of that, and that’s available to you.

The other pieces can come online once you start growing into that process. So I would suggest that everyone does their homework, understand what the needs are, understand what’s available out there. With the internet today, we’ve got all that information right at our fingertips. We can look up and understand and read reviews, and see what’s happening out there in the market today. They can even watch this, like a video blog like we’re doing here today and understand and learn from it what their needs are. So I would suggest doing your homework and understanding what the opportunities are.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Those are great points. So with, again, the technologies are out there, there’s tools that we’ve never had before, there’s opportunities for improvement. What do you think a company today, in this environment, this climate, with everything going on in this crazy town USA, 2020, that we’re all kind of victims of, for lack of a better term, what does a company focus on to continue to growing? It sounds like everybody’s pretty darn busy. There’s a lot of work to do. How do they turn that work into productive growth?

 

Mike Gillum:

So again, I think technology is a big part of the answer. I think that understanding what the needs are for your organization today. You’ve got X amount of jobs that you’re currently working, you’ve got X amount of jobs that you’re currently bidding, or are coming up for bid over the next six to nine months or 12 to 18 months, depending on the size of your company and how far out you’re looking, but you need to have an understanding of where you’re headed. Where are we today? Are we comfortable where we are today? Are we a lifestyle business?

We’re always going to be a $25 million contractor. Do we have aspirations to be a $50, $75, $100 million contractor? That’s going to help answer a lot of those questions. If growth is in your future, then I highly suggest technology is a big part of your research and what you’re looking for to grow.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s great advice also. I think just reading between the lines with what you’ve been sharing, it sounds like cloud-based technology is another real key differentiator between just plugging another software tool and that’s standalone.

 

Mike Gillum:

100% agreed. Yeah. I think cloud is the future, but it’s also the here and now. Cloud technology is available today in the marketplace for almost every single aspect of your business. Whether it’s the takeoff and estimating side, the bidding side, the project management side, the scheduling side, the accounting, the ERP space, all available in the cloud today. What the cloud really means is, as you’re well aware, Mike, is anywhere, anytime access. I can be sitting here where I am in Sarasota, Florida, you’re in Utah, other people are all around the world and within minutes, you and I can go on a piece of software, enter information, and it’s instantly available to them.

They don’t have to utilize any technology like VPN or Citrix, and those can get expensive where you’re having to hardwire things in. Cloud is there. Cloud is anywhere, anytime, any device. Doesn’t matter if you’re on a Mac or a PC, you have access to that information. So I think if you’re looking today at replacing one of your big pieces of software in your organization, then you should 100% be looking towards the cloud.

 

Mike Merrill:

Great point. So what’s the difference between server-based, or I should say cloud computing or true web based systems? Is there a difference and what does that mean to you?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, there is a difference. So there’s companies out there that are calling themselves hosted cloud products or hosted cloud services. What that really means is they’ve taken a server-based product that’s built to run on a company server, and they’re just plugging that up in the cloud, whatever type of cloud service, private cloud, or one of the public clouds that are out there, and they’re calling it a cloud software, but it’s not really true cloud.

It’s not built in the web, for the web, with the latest and greatest technologies. That’s the biggest differences is taking an older technology, perhaps something that was developed 20 or 30 years ago, depending on what we’re talking about, and plugging it in the cloud. You’re not going to get the speed. You’re not going to get the benefits of a true cloud solution that’s built in the web for the web by going with a hosted cloud solution.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, that’s a great clarification. So I think as I think of the things that you’ve mentioned here, for companies to grow in 2021 and to plan for the future, it sounds like investing in cloud based systems that are integrated on a cloud platform, is that your best recommendation?

 

Mike Gillum:

It is. I mean, you need to look… Again, you need to look at your organization, what’s your plans for the future are, where are we today, what’s our budget? Budget’s always a big part of anything, whether it’s personal or professional, and then understand what the needs are, but again, having access to real time information and having all of the players involved on a project able to access that information, I don’t think anything other than the cloud based software is going to provide that to anyone.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well stated. So one other thing I’ve just got to say, and this is more of a compliment. Hate to put you on the spot, but you and I co-presented on a software webinar a few months back. I’ve done literally hundreds of these over the years, and I really came away thinking, “Wow, Mike is a master presenter.” You really-

 

Mike Gillum:

I appreciate that.

 

Mike Merrill:

I wonder, what do you think has helped you have that confidence and the competence in presenting to large groups on something like that with software?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. I appreciate those kind words, Mike. Thank you very much. And coming from you, an industry veteran that’s probably done as many, if not more than I have done, from a public speaking engagement perspective, I really appreciate that. I think it’s understanding your space. Having done the homework on what you’re talking about, and having lived and breathed automated construction software for the past, almost, three decades has certainly helped me get to the place where I am today.

So it’s knowing what I’m talking about, it’s having the ability to speak publicly, and not be afraid to get up there and put your face out there, and just go for it. But really it’s understanding your topic. You don’t have to be an expert, but you’ve got to know what you’re talking about and you’ve got to have the right answers. When you don’t, it’s okay to say, “You know what? I don’t know the answer to that, but I can find somebody who can. I can get you to an expert.” And you’re aware, we have dozens of people we can turn to in this industry that we’ve known for a long time to help get answers and drive people in the right direction.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s great advice. I think even for any business owner, each of us have the opportunity to be a leader in a various capacity. So plugging into whatever it is really investing of yourself in those important details, I think is critical.

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah. Well, that’s a great point, Mike. I’m glad you said that. So I’ve always been a fan of education, furthering your education. I don’t mean through college or going out and getting your master’s or doctorate degrees or things like that. I’m talking about educating yourself from a business perspective. Whether that’s through reading a book from a leader that you like to follow, or somebody that writes something about a certain organization.

There’s lots of opportunity out there to better yourselves from a public speaking perspective, there’s a product out there called Demo to Win. I’m sure you’re familiar with that. I’ve taken numerous sessions with the Demo to Win folks and learned so much from them. So that’s definitely been helpful to me being able to understand tell, show, tell. Tell what you’re going to talk about, show it, and then tell it. Don’t just show, show, show, show, show. You’ve got to tell the story and then come back to the tell again.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s great advice, again, for anyone in business, because we’re all in sales, regardless of whether we think are-

 

Mike Gillum:

No matter what position you’re in, that’s right.

 

Mike Merrill:

Again, we’re selling a vision, we’re selling our commitment, our integrity whatever business we’re in. In construction, we’re selling the experience. It’s not just the sticks of bricks, but I’m your contractor of choice because I’m going to land you safely with a completed project on time, on budget, and it’s meeting the expectation that you have envisioned in your mind. If you do a better job of selling that vision, you’re going to be more successful.

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s exactly right. Ultimately that’s going to drive you happy customers, referenceable customers, and that just keeps on snowballing for sure. Great point.

 

Mike Merrill:

Better stories to share for the next one. Right?

 

Mike Gillum:

That’s exactly right. Yep.

 

Mike Merrill:

Great. Well, this has been so much fun today, Mike. I guess one thing just in wrapping up that I’d like to ask each of the guests. What is one process or hack for lack of a better term that you’ve plugged into over your career that you feel like is your strength or the super power that you have to share? And maybe how can somebody else learn to do something similar?

 

Mike Gillum:

Yeah, sure. Great question. So I’m a hands-on guy. I like to get my hands dirty. Whether that’s on the computer, inside of a piece of software, learning how that software works and understanding it so I can better understand how it may interact with whatever software I’m working with, or how it might help a company or a business. So I like to get my hands dirty. I like to know as much as I can about it.

I’ve also got an old 1994 Jeep Wrangler that I get my hands dirty on quite often in order to keep it running. So again, I like to get into the weeds and understand how things work, and then obviously being able to share that information and help educate others. But I think that being helpful to people, whether it’s in your personal life or professional life, and being kind to others… I know that’s a term that perhaps is sometimes overused, but maybe not enough in this day and age is also very important. Treat others how you would want to be treated with respect no matter someone’s standing or anything else, I think is extremely important. So I definitely live by those credos.

 

Mike Merrill:

Great. Well, thank you. That sounds fantastic and great advice. I appreciate you joining us today. I’ve had a great time. We’ll have to do this again down the road.

 

Mike Gillum:

Sounds great. Thanks for having me, Mike. Have a great day.

 

Mike Merrill:

Absolutely. And to the guests, thank you so much for joining us today on the Mobile Workforce Podcast. Sponsored by About Time Technologies and Work Max. If you enjoyed the conversation that Mike and I had today, or able to learn anything new or valuable, please give us a follow on Instagram @WorkMax_, and also subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify, Google podcasts, or whatever your preferred podcast platform is, so you’ll never miss another insightful episode. Also, if you enjoyed the podcast, please leave us a five-star rating and review. That helps support, helps us to provide this valuable content and information with other businesses and individuals like yourselves so they can improve, number one in business, and also in turn in life.