Purpose, Process and Profit, The Keys to Construction Business Success

The co-founder of gFour Marketing and the Wealthy Contractor, Brian Kaskavalciyan has started and built seven companies. Brian has been where you are and is dedicated to helping other contractors be more successful.

In this episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast, Brian shares some of the secrets from his latest book, The 7 Secrets to Becoming a Wealthy Contractor.  Tune in to hear what it takes to achieve your personal and professional goals, and live the life you want to live.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Long-term success comes after a contractor removes themselves from the daily grind. If a contractor spends his time jumping from fire to fire, they will always be working on fires. But if they focus on growth and multiplying their time, their business will grow and their availability will expand.

  2. Leaders fail their employees by picking up their slack. As the owner, your job isn’t to be doing all of the work on the ground. It is to be growing and managing your people to do the best work they can. Provide them with training, set a high bar and get out of their way.

  3. Find balance between being an entrepreneur and contractor. Oftentimes, the busiest contractors don’t spend time working on physical projects. Instead, they’re managing the company’s sales and marketing. Expand how you approach your role, and know that to grow your business, you have to think more like a business owner than a contractor.

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Podcast Transcript:

Mike Merill:

Hello, and welcome to the mobile workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill. Today we are sitting down with Brian Kaskavalciyan, the co-founder and lead marketing strategists of G4 marketing. And I asked Brian today to talk about his new book, The Seven Secrets of Becoming a Wealthy Contractor. So welcome Brian, and we’re really looking forward to getting into the conversation today.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Hey Mike, thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

 

Mike Merill:

You bet. Before we get too far in the conversation, can you just give our audience a little bit of a rundown on your experience and what exactly G4 marketing is?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Yeah. So you want me to go all the way back?

 

Mike Merill:

Sure. Yeah tell us about it.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

I’ll give you the quick version. So G4 marketing, we started it in 2009, but back in 1993, 1994, I actually started off in going out in business on my own. And like I told you, before we started the recording, I built up a company. We did carpet cleaning, we did bathroom modeling. I had 10 trucks out on the road. And back then we were laughing about how I’d send these trucks out, I had no idea if they were going to get to their destination, do what they were supposed to do and get back home. But luckily it worked. I wish I had you, way back when. From there I just went on and started home improvement companies. I eventually developed a franchise in the home improvement space.

I sold that. And then in 2009, what I was always really good at was the marketing. I didn’t like running the business. I still don’t. I’m always really been good at business development and marketing. And the thing that I discovered about home improvement companies, and I learned this from my own experience was that, we spent so much time and effort and money on the front end to make leads, leads, leads, new, new, new, new, new, and we would completely ignore the opportunities that were on the backend for referrals, for repeat business, for optimizing the profitability of each and every customer relationship. And so we developed a system that basically does that for home improvement companies. And currently we work with a couple of 100 home improvement companies around the country are collectively, our clients do minimum somewhere between 750 and about $900 million a year and over a 100,000 jobs.

So we’ve got a lot of insight into, how do we make reviews? How do we make referrals? How do we get customers to come back? And so that’s G4 marketing. But we also have… And if I can just really quickly say this, we also have the wealthy contractor which came about, because look, I did it the hard way. And I bang my head against the wall. And I built up a company and all I was focused on top line, top line, top line. And eventually that company came crashing down and at 40 years old, I was broke. I’d lost everything. We had to move out of our house. We lost. I mean, it was ugly. And so over the years, just working with so many home improvement companies and with my own experience, we started to offer a lot of education for contractors. And so that’s where the wealthy contractor was born. That’s where the podcast was born.

And then that’s where the book came out of. I tell people jokingly, but it’s true. It’s like it all came out of pain and it’s pain that I don’t want to see other contractors have to go through. If, I can help somebody shortcut something, I feel like I’ve done my job.

 

Mike Merill:

Wow, that’s fantastic. So you really, you’re trying to help people avoid those potholes that you ended up hitting. Probably a lot of us in construction have done.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

You know, as well as I do that, the owners of home improvement companies are some of the hardest working people you will ever meet and really good people too, by the way. And the majority of them, and I hate to say that, but it’s true. The majority of them don’t make anywhere near the amount of money they could be making or should be making. And they just don’t recognize the value that they provide. And they don’t know how to get out of their own heads in order to go and build a company that works for them rather than them working for the company. And so that’s what we want to try and help people do.

 

Mike Merill:

That’s awesome. Let’s face it really, all of us get into business to make money. We all want to help people and do good things and be proud of our work and our legacy and all of these other things. But you go into business to earn profit. To have money, to invest and to do those things that you really are setting out to accomplish as far as your goal.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Well, and I was going to say too. And it’s not only about the money. Money is good. Of course, it’s a real driver, but it’s also really about freedom. It’s about having options. It’s about how do I create a business that will not only fund my ideal lifestyle, but it’s also going to help me have the time to do the things that I really want to do. How is it going to allow me to do the things that are going to allow me to make an impact in the world? You deal with a lot of entrepreneurs. And most entrepreneurs have this need to leave some sort of impact behind. Well, how are you going to do that if you’re working 60 hours a week and you’re not making any money and you can’t take any time off? And so I just wanted to throw that in there as well.

 

Mike Merill:

Yeah, that’s great. Really at the end of the day, what you’re saying… We always hear the coined phrase, time is money and obviously money to your point can create time and freedom. And so what is the difference between contractors that figure that out and the ones that never realize that dream of one day having that independence?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Well, a lot of it really boils down to what are you doing every day? So if you are out in the field, running from one fire to the next, if you are the person that’s doing everything in your business or nothing can operate without you there, that’s a problem. My business runs with, or without me. My business probably at this point needs me half a day a week, maybe. And so, there’s no way that we could get the success that we want, the wealth that we want, the freedom that we want from our business, if we’re stuck in the business, doing all of the things that other people should be doing, either people should be doing it or, systems and processes run by people should be doing. And so it goes back to the E-Myth Michael Gerber, which is a book I know you’ve read.

And Michael Gerber in that book, we learned the difference between working in your business versus working on your business. And I always say to people, working in your business is like, well, people on video can see this, but it’s like, you have your head down and you’re working right in this moment right now. When you’re working on your business, you’re looking for leverage. You’re looking for what are the things that are going to multiply my success. So if it’s an activity I’m working on today, the only activities I work on, for example, today are multipliers. Things that’ll take my time today, if I spend one hour here with you today, where is that going to show up later? I don’t want to trade one hour for X number of dollars. I just don’t. People offer me, they want me to come out and consult for them all the time and I don’t do it.

I tell them my minimum fee would be a $1,000 an hour and I don’t want to do it. I’ll tell them, I’m not available for six months hoping it just goes away because I don’t want to work dollar per hour. And so that’s really the big thing, is we got to get out of the way we have to fire ourselves every day from what we’re doing. And if you’re doing repetitive tasks that you could pay somebody $10 an hour, $20, $50, a $100 an hour for, give it to them but make sure, and this is the other side of it is you got to make sure you have a profit model in place that supports all of that.

 

Mike Merill:

Right? Yeah. I love what you said there. It’s something I learned over the years in business too, is it’s very important that we get out of our own way and that we work and focus the majority of our time as business owners or managers working on the business instead of in the business.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Yeah. There’s a huge difference between activity and productivity. Doing things that are just… So many people start the day, they go straight to their damn phones. They look at their email, which most of their email is BS by the way. But it’s activity. It’s like, “Oh, I’m answering emails.” Then they listen to the news. Then they start to go to their office. Then they’re bombarded by the people in their office. Then they’re running here, running there, doing this, doing that interruption. They have zero control. They’re completely in reactionary mode rather than proactive mode. And then at the end of the day, they’re exhausted. They can’t tell you what they’ve accomplished. And then at the end of the month, they wonder why they haven’t made any money. It’s like, look at how you’re spending your time every day.

 

Mike Merill:

Yeah. And if they did have goals, they never found any time to focus on those and actually accomplish them.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Exactly yeah.

 

Mike Merill:

But yet, I’m so slammed, oh so busy, it’s just crazy. Hair is on fire. But maybe you didn’t really get anything done. Really what I’m… If read between the lines, what I’m hearing is there’s really more of a marketing component of what you’re in the business of. That is a critical piece, not just producing something physically with your own hands, but actually marketing what you’re doing. Tell us a little bit about that and your feelings.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

What’s interesting is in the book, secret number four is understanding the real business that you’re in and my most successful clients. I got clients to do a couple million bucks a year. I got one client that will do a hundred and I think $60 million this year. Two brothers started this business 10 years ago and talk about working on the business rather than in the business they started off that way. But they understood… All of my most successful clients understand that the business that they’re really in, is a sales and marketing business. It may look like an HVAC company, it may look like a plumbing company, it may look like a roofing company, but what it really is at its core sales and marketing. So what is marketing? To me, it’s about everything that you do to create a customer, to keep a customer and multiply a customer.

And the different people have different definition. That’s just what I go by. And so when you look at it that way, it’s like, all right, I have to make customers. I got to make sure they’re happy. I got to keep them, and then I’ve got to multiply them. How do I get them to go tell other people, how do I get them to buy more? How do I get them to give me more money? How do I get them to come back more frequently? That’s the work? That’s the job, the rest of the stuff, the actual delivery of the service, the delivery of the product. It’s almost secondary. It’s almost like… I was talking with somebody yesterday, or the day before. A friend of mine asked me to talk to their daughter. Their daughter is thinking about a side hustle.

And because of what’s going on this year, she finds some time on her hands and she wants to make some extra money. And I told her, I said, “The thing that most people don’t realize.” She’s never been in business before. “The thing that most people don’t realize is that the hardest thing to do in business is get a customer.” And so look at you, you come up with this amazing software. This amazing service for people. And yes, that was hard. But if you didn’t have any customers, it’s all for nothing. You know how many people I’ve known that are in your business that are poured all of their money into software and developing software. And they never found a customer for it or enough customers to actually create a business out of it. So the hardest thing to do is create a customer.

And the most expensive. And so when you look at it as, “Okay, I got to make customers.” And making customers involved is not only getting a lead, but it’s converting that lead into a sale. And then it’s actually delivering on what you said you were going to do, making sure they’re happy, blah, blah, blah. And then, it just goes on and on. And so the companies that recognize, “Hey, we’re sales and marketing, but we just happen to look like this.” A restaurant, a dental practice, whatever, fill in the blank. It’s the people that get mixed up and think, “Oh, I’m in the HVAC business. I’m in the business of replacing.” No, you’re not.

 

Mike Merill:

You’re a businessman who happens to be in the business of changing those things, but you’re not an HVAC contractor.

 Brian Kaskavalciyan:

That’s right and the difference between the rich ones and the not so rich ones is the understanding of that. That’s one of the differences, one of the big differences, by the way.

 

Mike Merill:

We talked a little bit earlier, some of the technology changes and mobility and all these tools and all these things, and yet I still hear, and I’m sure you do too, with your clients. Every day, I hear somebody say, “Well, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” And so in their mind, it ain’t broke. And I’m looking at them almost cross eyed thinking, “Are you nuts it’s broken? This is broke. Paper is broken spreadsheet broken.” Those are not efficiency tools, those are archaic. That’s like, stone tablets in the caveman era, compared to the availability of mobility and solutions cloud-based technologies. How do we help contractors to leverage and really tap into those marketing opportunities that are now available to them?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Well, it all goes back to, what do you want out of your business? What do you want out of your business? Do you want to make more money, have more free time? Do you want to build wealth? Do you want to have real freedom? If you do, then you have to figure out ways to leverage. You have to figure out ways of multiplying the activities that you are doing. Leverage is key in business. And everything you just mentioned, all that stuff is great. And a lot of people get mixed up in technology for technology’s sake. But you and I both know, technology without the basics behind it, when you create something like that, it’s like people that get all hung up on internet marketing. Well, internet marketing, okay, there’s marketing. Internet is just another form of media.

It’s like TV. It’s like radio. It may have more bells and whistles to it, but the strategy behind it is exactly the same. It hasn’t changed in hundreds of years, it’s psychology and it’s math, it’s psychology and math. So if I’m going to put a dollar out in advertising, how am I going to get people to respond? And then am I going to get enough people to respond, to make it profitable? How am I going to know that? Well, I’m going to do the math on the backend. I’m going to run the metrics on the backend. And so all of these things that make doing make, doing business easier nowadays, are all things that yes, we used to do them the caveman ways I was telling you before, about my business. We had to do everything on paper and spreadsheets. Well today, everything is on the computer. Why we could still do it on paper and spreadsheets but why? The computer is much more efficient.

The programs that are in the computer make things more efficient. So what might have taken me 20 minutes, five years ago only takes a minute. That’s what I’m looking for. And I know that’s what the entrepreneur that values freedom, and values their time is looking for things like that.

 

Mike Merill:

Yes. I think it’s interesting that in construction, we count on plans. Blueprints, every single day, nothing gets built without a blueprint. And that goes for our businesses as well. And that’s, that’s what I’m hearing you say. What I love is your book The Seven Secrets of Becoming a Wealthy Contractor. I know that that is a blueprint to help companies to really put some of these things into action, because a tellers’ action, you’re in the same place you were before. What stands out to you in the current market conditions today from your book, what are things that you really think are helping contractors make a difference?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Well, I got to say, it’s still, to me is secret number one. And secret number one is understanding, what do you really want to get out of your business? How much money do you really want to make? I hear people all the time, when you go to events and you talk to people and you see them online, all these people are bragging about, “Oh, I did 5 million this year. I did 20 million. I did 50 million this year.” And other people look at that and they say, “Oh my God, I have to build a $20 million business.” I always ask people, “Well, okay, you’re here now. You’re telling me your goal is to build a $5 million business. Well, why? Why do you want to build a $5 million business?” And, “Well, I don’t know. I want to build a $5 million business.” And they don’t understand that.

Then I go and ask them and I said, “Well, how much money do you want to make?” And they say, “Well, I’d be really happy if I make $250,000 a year.” And I say, “Well, you don’t need a $5 million business to make $250,000 a year.” And without that clarity how do you know, where are we going? How do you know what you need to do in order to get there? And how do you focus on doing the right things rather than being distracted by all the wrong things. And I think that this is still a major problem with people. And I don’t know if there’s anybody out there that’s really talking about this. Is gaining clarity because everybody… You and me are out to sell people stuff.

And so people are always talking about, well, grow your business and do more and be more and all of that. I say, “Well, let’s take a step back and let’s look at what do you really want? What do you really want to get out of the business?” I even have a program the wealthy contractor blueprint. Where I walk people through, I talk about four numbers. So I’m not going to go into all of it here. But there’s four numbers that we all need to understand that when we put those four numbers together, that’s basically how much we need to make in order for us to live the life that we want to live. And so when you understand what those four numbers are, then you can say, “Okay, so those four numbers represent me getting this, this, this, and this. One of those numbers is the future. How am I going to set myself up for the future?” Then we can reverse engineer a business to figure out what it is that we really need our business to do in order to get us what we really want.

And I hope that’s answering your question. It’s a source of… It just blows me away, how many of us business owners just don’t know it’s just more and more and more, well, what do you want more and more and more for?

 

Mike Merill:

Yeah. I keep thinking of a dog chasing its tail.

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Exactly.

 

Mike Merill:

When I first was a framer, as a young man out of high school, working summers. And then I went into that profession and got into construction program. And, I remember when I was just doing framing, wishing I could be the general contractor that was actually hiring the framer. And what I realize one day is my head is down, laying out the next wall, nailing out together while you know, somebody else down the street is general contracting, these homes are or putting in this development. I had to put a plan together to try and figure out how do I become the guy that hires the guy that was framing like I was doing. And I think a lot of businesses, like you’re saying, don’t necessarily have that outline or that, that flag planted there on the peak of the mountain that they’re trying to get to. And if they don’t have it, then certainly their team doesn’t know that they have a plan or that there’s a flag that they’re trying to get to.

So they’re all chasing their tails. And I think the key is, like you said, in that plan, I think using these secrets and then having that blueprint is really the key to what’s going to help them to get out of the rot that leads to a semi-successful very busy. Somebody who’s going to have to work till they can’t just survive and maintain a reasonable lifestyle.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Right.

 

Mike Merill:

Getting back to marketing I think you talked about sales and marketing. I know that really there’s two sides to that. There’s the first one. And that is keeping the customers you have and making sure that they are potentially repeat customers. And then there’s gaining new customers. So there’s two sides to that. What can you tell us about either of those sides and how it relates to churn and what companies can do to focus on both?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

I’ll speak to what we do. What we focus on at G4 is really all on the backend is what happens when we get that customer. We, install the job for them. See what most, contractors do. And this is costing them a fortune, not only in money, but also in time. But what they do is they let that customer go and they go right back to, let me go get somebody new and let me go court this person and let me do whatever I have to do to sell them. And then I get them installed. I collect the money. Then I go back to the beginning and I get somebody new, new, new, all the while ignoring the people that we just did. And so for us, what we really focus on is how do we take that customer and get more out of them.

We paid a fortune to get that customer. We put our blood, sweat and tears into getting that job completed for them. So what do we have to do now in order to maximize the profitability? So one of the things that we could do is we could help drive more Google reviews right now, Google reviews are like gold they’re currency. There’s value to them. And I don’t know, people are making a big enough deal out of getting them. Look, everybody is going to the internet and checking you out. So people want to see frequency of reviews, they want to see quality of reviews, they want to see quantity of reviews. And so that’s one thing is after the job is done, what are we doing to get reviews? Because done right, Google reviews in particular will drive more leads. And if you use those to tell your story and table face to face, you’re going to get more sales.

So that’s, you know, that’s one piece of it. Then the other piece of it is depending on the business that you’re in. So if you’re in like home services, Oh my God, you got to get that company of that person to come back and buy from you again, as quickly as you possibly can, then you got to do it again. Then you’ve got to do it again four times, four times as quickly as you can, because if you get them four times, they’re yours. Chances are good they’re yours. If you’re in regular remodeling, they may not need you again for six months. They may not need you again for a year. They may not need you again for five years. Well, does that mean you stop talking to them? No way. Keep talking to them. And then what are you doing to get them, to bring their friends along?

Referrals, introductions to other people, to their neighbors, to their friends, to their family, to their coworkers. And so that is an area that I see… Right now leads are plentiful as we’re recording this, there’s plenty of leads for everybody. People are cooped up at home and home improvement is doing well. That’s not to say that the leads have gotten inexpensive by any stretch of the imagination. Every year, lead costs keep going up, advertising costs are going up. And so what are we doing again, to maximize that investment in that customer? Because like it, or not one way or another, whether it’s through money or through a sweat, you are paying to buy a customer. So if you’re buying that customer, what are you going to do to make sure you can get all the money out of them that you can?

 

Mike Merill:

Well, to your point, really, of course you’ve got to invest heavily upfront to get them in the first place. And it doesn’t matter if you’re in a software business or construction business. We use the number 80% say 80% of the deal is getting the customer in the first place. And then 20% to maintain and keep them moving forward. Whether you’re an electrical or pouring concrete or a general contractor, all of us have customers that could potentially be repeat customers. It’s just, are we on their minds? So when that need comes up again, they think of you first.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

By the way, that’s a nice rule of thumb that you just came up with that 80/20, because people think, Oh, I got to spend a fortune on the backend. They’re not even willing to spend a penny on the backend. You’re crazy. Spend a little bit. You don’t need to spend a fortune, just spend a little bit. That’s all it takes. Anyway. That’s, a good rule of thumb. I like the 80/20.

 

Mike Merill:

Well, and again I think proactively, we use a CRM here, customer relationship management tool, most companies do on some level, even if is Excel. They have a system, where they list these people and having regular discussion with them, reaching out to them, checking in on them, a gift card or a gift basket, or just thinking of them at all, dropping by some paths or some shirts or doing something, taking lunch to their guys. Whatever it is that you’re trying to in your business that you’re trying to do to foster that relationship, I think what I’m hearing is really a big key for being able to grow a business and actually tap into those dollars that you’re talking about. That a lot of people just aren’t collecting.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

It’s an investment, it’s an investment in your future.

 

Mike Merill:

So in doing that, how do contractors maintain quality while they expand and grow? And they’re working on all these things, how do you keep quality up while you also up the volume?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Systems, process, people. I talk a lot threes. So I talk about people, process and profit. People, process and profit. And that’s how you do it. You have good systems and processes. You bring on good people that fit within your core values and your culture to execute on those processes and systems. And you ensure that you’re profitable, that your profit model is right. What happens with a lot of people is, they’re not making money at a million dollars or, not enough money at a millions. I don’t know how many people I talk to that are making 5% profit margins. And I’m like, “You want to grow to $3 million. All you’re going to do. If you’re broken at a million, you’re going to be broken at three. And by the way, your headaches, aren’t going to triple, they’re going to be magnified by 10 times, your risk, your liability is going to magnify.”

If you’re not making money at 3 million there cert you’re certainly not going to make money at eight or 10 or 15 or 20. So you got to fix it early if, you’re making money early. And this is something that, again, this is one of the big mistakes that I made. I had a broken profit model in one of my businesses and for the sake of growing, I compromised. And I said, “Well, if we’re not bringing in enough money to fuel our growth, I’ll just go borrow money, I’ll grow with debt.” That’s the kiss of death. Anytime today, somebody tells me in the home improvement space or in the construction space that they’re going to borrow money to grow their business. I tell them they’re out of their minds because you should be able to grow your business with internal cashflow. And so I hope I’m answering your question.

It’s all about those big three people process and profit people, process of profit. That’s how you grow and that’s how you keep the quality, because if you ever… Sorry to cut you off. But if you have a process for customer experience and it’s never going to be perfect, but it’s a process and it delivers to you a consistent result, a reliable result. That’s good. Then now you can grow. Now you can start adding people. Now you can start adding more leads. Now you can make more sales. Now you can install more jobs, but if you’re broken in your process or you don’t have a process, forget it.

 

Mike Merill:

Yeah. To your point, and what I like about the way you answered that with, appropriate margins, when something goes wrong, you now have money and resources that you are willing to invest to maintain and to fix that issue and take the high road. Whereas if you got no margin and you’re not in the ditch before you’re even done, heaven forbid you run into something that you’ve got to really dig deep for because you’re going to take on water.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Yep, absolutely.

 

Mike Merill:

You’re investing in your success by ensuring that there’s an appropriate margin to make those right decisions. When you’ve got to make a tough call. Quality could suffer. Brian, this has been a fantastic conversation. I’ve really enjoyed it. How do our listeners find out more about you and some of the exciting things that you’re doing to help people in the construction industry?

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Probably the best place to start is to go to the wealthy contractor.com, the wealthy contractor.com. And when you go there, we’ve got a bunch of resources that are free. We’ve got our podcasts the wealthy contractor. You can get a copy of my book, The Seven Secrets to Becoming a Wealthy Contract. The way it works Mike, I was telling you this earlier, basically I bought a thousand books a few months ago when I first released the book just to give out to, people that were podcasts listeners. And I said, “Look, I’ll buy the book. You just pay shipping and handling.” Well, we burned through those thousand like that. And so I just kept going, so I buy a thousand books at a time. I don’t know how much longer I’m going to do it for it. But right now, when this airs, if you go to the wealthy contractor.com, you can get a copy of the seven secrets to becoming a wealthy contractor for free. Basically, I just ask you to pay for shipping and handling. That’s The best entry point.

 

Mike Merill:

Yeah. That’s fantastic. Well, I know that I’m excited to read this book. I’ve learned from what you’ve shared with us today, for sure. And I know that our listeners will as well. Before we wrap up one last question, I’d like to end on if you’ve learned a shortcut or a hack or your secret sauce over the years of your experience. What’s that one thing that you would tell our listeners that maybe they can learn from you and your experience. You could boil that down to one point.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Oh God, Mike I’m going to go back again to the whole clarity thing. I really wish when I was younger, I really understood what I really wanted to get out of the business. I thought I knew, I thought I just wanted to make a lot of money and take trips and be free and all of that, but the clarity wasn’t there and the other thing too… Sorry, I’m going to give you two things. One is, I wish that I had asked for more help. I wished that I had gone to people that had already been there and done that and ask them for more help. And so I think with clarity, with understanding what it is that you really want, and if you’re willing to go and seek out people that are… I mean, look nothing’s new, it’s all been done before.

Everybody thinks that they’re different and that their situation special and unique and different and all that. Reality of it is yes, we are all unique and beautiful in our own ways, but the road you’re on building a business, becoming wealthy, having more freedom, having more success, it’s been done, go find somebody that’s in a similar business as yours, go ask them how they did it, ask them what books they read, ask them how they spend their time, follow them around for a while, learn from them and shortcut your success. Why do it the hard way? So I hope that… I don’t know if that’s considered a hack, but I like shortcuts, man. I love shortcuts.

 

Mike Merill:

I think that’s sage advice for our listeners. So thank you so much today. Very much enjoyed Brian speaking with you and getting to know you a bit better and look forward to hopefully having another conversation together down the road.

 

Brian Kaskavalciyan:

Cool. Thanks Mike. Thanks for having me.

 

Mike Merill:

And thank you all to the listeners for joining us today on the mobile workforce podcast, sponsored by about time technologies and work max. If you liked the conversation that Brian and I had today and were able to learn anything new or have some helpful tips or tricks or things that you can implement in your business, please follow us on Instagram at work max underscore and subscribe to the show. And whatever podcast platform you like to listen to podcasts on, please give us a five-star rating and review and help us to continue to bring these valuable resources to you and other listeners like yourselves again. Thanks. And we’ll catch you on the next one.