Tag Archives: Construction Software

The Unseen Cost of Your Construction Process Problem

The Unseen Cost of Your Construction Process Problem

No one in the construction industry is sitting around on their hands. And if being busy equals success, then every contractor would be a millionaire. We invited Jeffrey Nesbitt, the director of consulting services at CLA, to come on the show and talk about productivity and the costs of not buttoning up your processes and procedures.

In today’s episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast, learn how to take a new look at your processes and determine what needs to change. Jeffrey gives contractors actionable ideas on how to implement new processes and how they can make sure that the new habits stick for the long term.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Your problem is costing you something. Inefficiencies in business are unavoidable and some are easier to ignore than others. But don’t assume because it’s out of mind, that it isn’t costing your bottom line. 
  2. Profit fade is a great indicator of issues that need to be fixed. Profit fade is the gradual loss of profit over the course of a project. Contractors should identify sources of trouble –– and address them –– to keep their profit levels steady. 
  3. Assign a point person ownership over new process implementations. Before launching a new construction process – whether it’s a technology solution or a time tracking requirement – put one person in charge of owning the implementation to ensure the rest of your team does their part. 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to the Mobile Workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill. And today we are sitting down with Jeffrey Nesbitt, the National Director of Consulting Services at CLA. We asked him on the show today to talk about the cost of not fixing your business communication problems. Welcome Jeffrey. We are grateful to have you on the podcast today.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Thanks Mike. Appreciate you guys having me on looking forward to our time.

 

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. This’ll be fun. First off, why don’t you tell us a little bit about kind of your background, your company and the day-to-day for you?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I started off in this crazy industry, I don’t know, 16, 17 years ago. Did some estimating and project management for a masonry company. And soon discovered, although I love the work, that it probably wasn’t for me. From there actually jumped into the construction technology sector. Spent the better part of my career in the technology specific around construction for a decade or so before moving into CLA’s role here. Helping them head up their construction practice for our clients around best practices, operations and utilizing technology.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s awesome. Well, you have a very diverse background for sure. I’ve seen you around the “circuit”, so to speak, for most of those 17 years.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, we bumped in more than once. That’s for sure. That’s why I was looking forward to chatting with you guys today and sharing with you a little bit about what we’re doing and seeing.

 

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. Well, that’s great. Every week we try and have some meaningful conversations, things that hopefully we can bring some aha moments to people in the industry and in the trades. One of the things that we wanted to focus on with you today is really, what is the cost of companies not addressing or fixing their technology issues or challenges that you teach to companies?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

That’s a great question because that’s really what drove me to move to CLA. There’s a certain point in time when you’re on the software side or the operations, or being an actual contractor, where we have to merge these worlds together. We just saw at CLA that there was a gap there, if you will, that needed to be filled. We have over 9,000 clients at CLA and over 350 employees focused specifically in construction. We’re another verticals, but really in the construction, we’ve been voted number one by Construction Executive Magazine the last two years in a row. We’re really excited about that because, as a services firm, we want to bring more than some just traditional services. So, for us aligning operations and best practices and technology has been a key differentiator.

When we work with our clients, I know you guys see it too, contractors are busy. Everybody’s busy. There’s no one sitting around on their hands. We’re short staffed. We’ve got a lot to do. We all see challenges or things broken in our own companies or in our own lives. We’re so busy, we don’t have time to fix them.

To your point, there is a cost of not fixing problems. It’s the cost of what are you losing? That’s really what we try to focus on and share with our clients is, “Yeah, we can get better if we implemented a new mobile app.” That’s a true statement. But if we don’t have time to implement it, what is it costing us not to do that. That’s really where I help share with our clients that there is a cost to do nothing. A lot of times that cost outweighs actually doing something.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Very insightful. Again, with your background, you would know, no question about it. I guess if I’m trying to break it down, it sounds like you use the example of the mobile app. It sounds like communication tools are one area of improvement that companies could take, to kind of fix those communication gaps. What are some examples of things like that the companies can adopt to improve?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, the biggest hurdle in our industry is that communication and within communication is really data, isn’t it? That’s what communication is. We’re sharing information back and forth. And as contractors, if someone tells us, you’re a data company, we go crazy. “What are you talking about? No, I build high rises or I lay asphalt.” And all that fun stuff. But the truth is, you’re collecting data.

When you don’t have a way to get that information from the field to the back office, that’s where I see with our clients, profit fade happening. That’s what the big challenge is. We are so busy and a lot of times we understand we have challenges. It’s just not the technology piece, Mike. I think more importantly, it’s the process piece. That’s really where we focus our efforts, because if we can’t fix our processes, it doesn’t matter what technology we apply. It’s not going to help it, or in some cases, it’s going to make it worse.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s a great point. You mentioned a word, you talked about profit fade. What does that mean for our listeners?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

The simplest thing is margin. In our industry, we’ve got some of the tightest margins of any industry in the world, but yet we build the most complex projects. So, profit fade is when we take that very, very small margin and we start shrinking it down and down and down until there’s almost nothing there, because we’re not communicating effectively. We’re wasting time looking for project data information, that’s maybe causing conflicts out in the field, that may be causing reworks.

All this stuff adds up to time. Time is money. When we sit down with our clients and go through sort of, “What is it you’re doing today?” That’s where we really find out what’s the cost of doing nothing, Mike. When we find out, “Hey, what happens when a project manager’s got approve an AP invoice? What does that process look like?”

What if he has a change order and doesn’t submit it in a timely manner? It’s sitting on a notepad in his truck. Because mobile office. That’s the stuff that we look at. There’s been studies done by FMI, PlanGrid, even anecdotally myself, it will show that, in a typical week, there’s almost 35% of people’s time spent on non-optimal activities. That’s the cost of doing nothing. That’s hours. If your PM’s losing four to five hours a week, that’s money. If you’ve got five, 10 PMs, that could be another full-time employee. Who wouldn’t love to find a full-time employee in this market.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Right. Great point. Yeah. A lot of construction companies have those resources. They’re just not leveraging them properly, because they’re wasting time on tasks and efforts that don’t bring revenue.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s really clean up those internal processes first. The old Michael Jackson song, The Man in the Mirror. You got to do that first look inside and say, “What am I doing, Mike?” I’s hard as a contractor, we’re proud people and we love to just do it ourselves. “Yeah, I know what the problem is and I’ll fix it myself. Who’s got the leakiest roof in the neighborhood, it’s the roofing contractor. Why? Because he doesn’t have time. There’s just no time.

That’s why I always encourage people. If you can bring in somebody to help you to actually manage this process of, “Hey, how do we clean up some of these internal things and figure out what is best practices?” That’s when you can apply technology. Otherwise, you’re just buying technology, for the right purposes. People have good intentions in their hearts. Owners are buying mobile applications, whether it’s a project management, mobile timekeeping, forms in the field, things like that. But if they don’t implement a process that the technology can support, then you’re really losing user adoption. There’s no ROI for these folks, unfortunately.

 

Mike Merrill:

What I’m hearing and something that I always like to say too is, “Software to work properly and to be of value requires users.” That means they have to use, if they’re not opening the app and leveraging the tools within it, then there’s no value.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I haven’t seen an app yet that’s like a genie bottle where you rub it and unicorns and rainbows shoot out and everything’s wonderful. It still takes people and processes. The technology is that last piece. You have to do those other two things first in order to leverage technology. Then again, it’s consistently reinforcement and training. Configuring that technology to mirror your processes also helps in the user adoption, because this is the way we work.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love that you talked about people and processes, because again, software can be the magic bullet, but without people utilizing it properly, it’s shelfware collecting dust.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

What are some of the challenges that you see most prevalent in construction companies today to avoid adoption or to kind of knock the adoption into a rut and then what can companies do to help avoid those pitfalls?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Well, it’s all about commitment. It’s like anything else in life, if you’re not committed to something or the activity or the task at hand, it’s not going to be successful. You have to have commitment from senior leadership first, then you have to have a plan in place that supports that commitment. Which is, how do we utilize this technology? How do we leverage it in our day-to-day functions? Then furthermore, it’s making sure that they’re doing these things.

If you’re going to buy a project management solution or a mobile timekeeping solution, when you’re having your weekly or monthly PM updates, are you reviewing the reports that the software generates? That helps encourage people that, I have to utilize this tool, because every Friday I’m going to sit down and the boss is going to pull it up and say, “Well, where’s the data? Where’s the numbers?”

You sort of have to build that into your management processes to encourage people getting on board and utilizing the technology. If there’s no accountability there, if we’re not referencing the tool or we’re using it to manage our projects or processes, then you’re exactly right, it can get thrown on a shelf. That’s what happens with mobile stuff. I know you see it, Mike, most of all. It’s not like an accounting system where, “Hey, we got to run payroll, so we have to do it.” It really forces it. You have to take that same thought process and apply that to your field tools.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great advice. I think one of the things, I always hear this phrase, “You can’t manage what you don’t measure.” I love that and agree with it. However, just because you’ve measured it, doesn’t mean you’re done. You’ve got to execute and apply that measurement to that process. Then, now you’re leveraging the data. People are depending on it and counting on it. There’s kind of a plan to execute the plan. So, here’s what we’re going to measure. Here’s what we’re going to do to review and be accountable and report on those findings. Then, you can actually invoke change is what I’m hearing you saying.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Absolutely. When I look at our clients and we talk, the people that aren’t learning today from that data that they’re collecting and the information, those are the ones unfortunately probably won’t be around tomorrow. We used to be in a market where we could throw more people at a problem and fix it. We don’t have that today. If we can’t take these tools and utilize them to turn 1:00 PM into 2:00 PM, have a field supervisor be able to manage just one more project on his plate. We can have the revenue going up without adding the headcount. We can make more effective decisions as an organization. I joke with contractors, I’m like, you’re a data management company and a learning organization. If you’re not, you need to be, because your competitors are.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love that. I’ve heard of contractors referred to as risk managers. That’s what they are. I love that you are calling them a data organization. I haven’t heard that phrase before. I hope you don’t mind if I steal it a little bit.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

No, just don’t trademark it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Mike Merrill:

Helping each other out. What I’m hearing though, is that there are some costs to put these processes in place. Some of it’s money, that’s the obvious one, your time, a consulting firm’s time, a software provider’s time. Then, when we get an investment in a process or a solution that we feel like is going to be beneficial, hopefully there’s an ROI or return on investment on that technology, right?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

How long have you seen some of those take, for example, maybe a couple of different systems or process you put into place? Maybe you can share some generic examples, so people know what they’re looking at.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

When you talk people, process and tools and software, that really is that triangle of truth, if you will, of when we put things together. For me, the ROI on the people, process and software is probably the most easy thing to measure. If I look at mobile timecards. I just was at a client last week, they’re still using paper timecards. We’ve got over 9,000 clients. A lot of them are still using paper timecards. That’s one example where I look at it and I say, “Okay, it’s taking you 20 minutes to get a timecard processed.” That’s from the time that they get it to the office, to them entering it into whatever accounting system they have, to being able to update their job cost reports and then print checks. Well, you know, a simple tool like a mobile timekeeping, that could save you 15 minutes.

That’s like an easy ROI. “Okay, well, 15 minutes times how many employees?” I mean, that’s simple math. For me, it goes so far beyond the ROI, which I think in any application nowadays it’s a year or less, it’s six months or less in some of these mobile apps, quite honestly. But what’s the real value, is visibility. It’s visibility into your job, a snapshot, a look in a window at any point in time. That to me is way bigger than anything I’m going to spend on consulting and or software. Because, I want to know from the time of an occurrence happening to the field, what does that cost impact realized in the office, so I can make a decision. That is shortening that cycle. That’s profit fade. How do we get it down?

For me, it’s about having confidence in my numbers, visibility to my organization, to make decisions about the future of where we’re going to go. Forrester Research, they did this study that said you have only 12% of the available data executives doing decision-makers, were making a decision on their company. That, to me, is the value. Can you imagine in this world, something we can all relate to, COVID-19. When you go into your doctor, are you going to accept 12% of his diagnosis only. Where in life is this acceptable?

 

Mike Merrill:

Or some kind of a bad illness and they say you got a 12% chance of living. Not very good.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, exactly. Only 12% of the solution. To me, that’s the bigger picture. Owners and executives, when I talk to our clients, I’ll be honest, that’s what keeps them up at night. Is not understanding or having that visibility on what’s happening in a project, or even having confidence in it.

 

Mike Merrill:

I read another report, it was McKinsey and Associates, they said that according to that one, it was a certain segment of questioning, but they said that only 6% of the data was being leveraged. This is a few years back. Whether it’s six or 12 or even 20, it’s horrid.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Let’s say 40%, congratulations, it’s still not good enough.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Unbelievable. What I’m hearing is really data is the key to not only improving, but really making those decisions that are not only going to make you around next week, next month, next year. There’s a huge opportunity to widen the gap between you and the competition if you can harness this data, even a fraction more.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, absolutely. I think, again, it all just walls back into that, “Hey, how do we clean up our internal processes?” Because, when we go out and we talk with our clients, one of the commonest things I hear is, “I work with the estimating department. I work with the accounting department. I work with project managers, the field, the sups.” The reality is, it’s the way we estimate a job, it’s not the way we account for a job, which is not the way we manage or build it in the field.

But everyone in that company is touching a job at any given point in time. You have to connect those bridges and those dots together to get the full picture in your organization. For companies that are productivity driven, this is really, really important. The units in place, the quantities, the linear feet, square feet, all that type of measureables. If you’re not seeing that in real time today, that’s the real challenge in the market.

 

Mike Merrill:

Real time productivity tracking and trending, I guess, is what I’m hearing.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah, absolutely. It’s the hugest risk that contractors are facing right now. Especially when they have separate estimating, accounting, project management tools. If they’re not all talking to each other and you’re still having to do data entry from one to another, that’s definitely a red flag or an area for risk.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. So, integrating that data, letting it communicate with other systems or sharing of that data, I heard the real time component. Does that mean cloud-based solutions are kind of where you try and push that or-

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

This is not a personal religious belief of mine or anything, but it’s all to the cloud. It’s trending there. It’s all there. The reality is, is even the ones that are still sell on-prem, you host it and that’s what they push. The market wants that. I know our clients at CLA want that. They’re not looking to become IT companies. The thing I always hear most is, is “I bought my last server. What do I need to do?” Because no one needs those any more in the storage closets and all that fun stuff.

Yeah, having a cloud-based software is more important now than ever. I encourage the contractors listening that whatever product you pick needs to be like Switzerland. It needs to play well with others. Because, it’s about the best solution for the right department to achieve what they need to do. But, as an organizational holistically, ownership needs to say, “Hey, do these things all play well together, because I’m not buying four applications that have four people have to type in information into each one.”

 

Mike Merrill:

You sound like a guy that’s been around the block a time or 10.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I have. I’ve got a weird background. I try to use that to leverage to help the contractors. I have a passion around the industry, because we get to see it everywhere. Isn’t it exciting when you walk out your door and you see our industry and the homes you just locked out, the bridge’s tolls you’re going across, the highways. It’s an exciting industry. I do have a passion around making sure we are efficient in what we do and profitable.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I love that. It is everywhere and it touches everyone. I live in a home somewhere, an apartment or condo, whatever it is.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Right.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re living in a structure and somebody had to build that thing and has to maintain it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

And the roads you drive down, the bridges, like you say. It’s what attracted me to it. I always wanted to get into construction, because I wanted to be able to do those things. I don’t know my path to get there, but it unfolded before me. I took those roads that led me down the path. Those led me back here where I’m helping growing a software company. But, that company serves the construction industry because just like you, that’s where my expertise and my passion have been. It’s great to have friends in the industry that feel passionate and excited about it like I do.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s an exciting time, I think in our industry. I think it’s been trending that way as you know, for probably the last five to seven years, but really here in 2020, it’s really picked up with the pandemic. I know within our clients, if they weren’t stressing about PPP, they were reaching out to me to say, “Jeffrey, in this, no, on-premise no touch world, how do I know what’s going on with my projects? We can’t drive timecards into the office anymore because the payroll clerk ain’t there to pick them up.”

 

Mike Merrill:

If they are, they may not want to touch the paper.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Right. Exactly. We’ve been trending this way, but really it’s been kicked into overdrive this year, because of the pandemic. I don’t think it’s ever going to go back. I think organizations are learning that this is where the efficiencies are in operations. You can make your accounting department a little more efficient, but usually they’re running pretty lean. It’s in the operations. It’s in the project management. It’s in the field. It’s in the crews. It’s in time keeping. It’s in solutions around those areas.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nobody gets paid until somebody built something or put something in place. That means the dollars can either stack up or be siphoned out at that point. So, leveraging that data in real time as those things are occurring, so you can make those decisions. It feels like you’re saying that’s kind of the low hanging fruit, is kind of capturing that at the source initially, then let everything else, all that data roll through the process where everybody else can make decisions based on that.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. It’s at the source and the source of it, it could be anything. It could be at the estimating level, it could be at the field or the accounting level. As I mentioned earlier, everything’s interlinked. So as the life cycle, the job happens, the right person should be entering the right data at the right time, so we can use that to make better decisions.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. That’s great. All right. We’ve talked about some of those gaps, some of those challenges. Are there any stories you can think of, generically, you don’t have to name clients, but where somebody actually put something in place, like these things we’re talking about, and actually shared their surprising results with you and excitement or enthusiasm of “Oh, wow”, anything that comes to mind? Yeah.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. The low-hanging fruit I always find is in the payroll piece. I find it in accounts payable, believe it or not. Then I find it in project management. Sometimes, when we look at a payroll process, like I said, “Hey, if we can cut 15 minutes off, it could save us all this time.” A lot of times, with the mobile apps, there’s more things than just the payroll. There’s different forms out there that they’re filling in, or they’re taking pictures that could relay problems to offset.

I can tell you on the payroll side, I’ve seen companies save literally millions of dollars, a large contractor that had lots of employees, 10,000 employees. Let’s just say they could save, it was $3, $4 million annually every year, year after year after year. But more importantly, what happened is, is it gave them that visibility into some of those job cost reports like we were talking about. Where they were starting to see some of these labor overruns happening quicker on their jobs than they were previously doing. When they weren’t blowing out the truck window or being stuck under the seat, they were missing those opportunities. Depending on the size of contractor you are, it could be substantial.

 

Mike Merrill:

In those cases, were those companies surprised?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Like I said, Mike people recognize they have challenges or problems. It’s the whole, “I don’t have time to fix it.” That’s why I like to say, “There is a cost of doing nothing” Again, that’s both fiscally money lost, but more importantly, I think it’s opportunity and visibility. Right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Opportunity costs, meaning, I guess if we put this in maybe a trades contract or context, if you’re framing 50 homes a year, one a week or something. That takes you 600 man hours to do it on paper. What I’m hearing is maybe they could do it really in less hours that are now paid and documented because of a real-time app, as opposed to pencil with a timesheet.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Significant. You could figure it out or you have a consultant come in who can figure that out. But the truth is, is I would imagine, it could add up to several or a dozen extra homes a year.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. It could even be a month.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Yeah. Big opportunity. Really, when I hear that and I put my contractor hat back on and think about when I was in business trying to do this same thing, this same hustle, that’s exciting that most businesses today are profitable in their current processes and market. If they could make these changes and invest that little bit extra money in a system and a little bit of their resources, you said six months, or maybe even less on some of these things.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Oh, absolutely. Yes, absolutely. It used to be a year, an average sort of, when we looked at across different tools. Let’s just say, whether it was estimating, accounting, the field, it’s down to six months. Like I say, timecards and AP processing, even billing, quite honestly, is improving cash flow and forecasting, when you could tie in some of these mobile applications that let the PM do the billing out in the field.

 

Mike Merrill:

You mentioned before, you talked about change orders and maybe it was on somebody’s book, in their mobile office, their truck, sitting on the seat, now they missed the window or opportunity to submit that bill. Maybe there’s unbilled labor that you’re spending the money on investing and getting nothing for. So the opportunity is gone, the cash is gone and you can’t bill anybody to replenish any of that. Right?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. I worked with a contractor to be nameless and they had some good tools. They had the good software application. They had a good project management software application. Like I said, if it’s not like Switzerland and it doesn’t play well with others, it doesn’t do you any good. Because, when I went in there and sort of did the review, you go in and you find a $300,000 change order for a job that’s been closed for a year. Right? Again, it’s knowing that, and knowing it in a timely manner is more important, isn’t it? What we thought we had winners on, we sometimes have dogs. We didn’t get an opportunity to fix it, because it wasn’t integrated.

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting. When you hear that pushback, have you had companies that pushed back then maybe came back down the road later and said, “You know what, I think we just got to bite the bullet and do this.” What are some of those experiences?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I would say for the most part, by the time it hits my desk or my team’s desk, there’s a fair amount of pain. Through some conversations, they realize, “Yeah, we need to do this because we can’t keep kicking the can down the road” type of thing. Yeah, absolutely. Where we talk to them, we share some challenges that we’re seeing in their market or their industry or their local, as I mentioned, got 130 offices. Each sort of market has its own unique individual challenges. They’ll come back and say, “Yeah, you’re right.” Unfortunately, it’s after they probably lost on a job somewhere by not addressing it and said, “We got to do it now.”

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re more in the emergency room level of care, not the clinic down the street?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Sometimes I get brought in, when the fire is on the fifth floor as opposed to the ground floor sometimes.

 

Mike Merrill:

They’re coming in, in an ambulance.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Exactly.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s why it’s just best to… “When’s the right time? No time like today” is what I say.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Like planting a tree, they say.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

When’s the best time to plant it? 20 years ago.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, exactly. They’re starting to feel, with this pandemic, these different challenges. I think it’s bringing it sort of to the forefront a little bit, which, if there’ll be one good thing out of 2020, maybe that’ll be it.

I’ve heard that from a lot of companies, actually. They said, a lot of this stuff has been long overdue. This is just forcing our hand. Even with the social distancing and kind of the safe environments they’ve got to create, so maybe they don’t have as much labor. They’ve got to do more work with less people. They’re just being forced to get rid of these extra steps and processes and make decisions that give them visibility that they didn’t never put the time into or the money into before.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I think it just leads back to the labor shortage. Like I said, we used to throw people at the problem and we had a bunch of them. We could overcome it with manpower. We just don’t have that today. How do you overcome some of these challenges of getting projects done efficiently and timely when you don’t have people to sort of toss at it? I think that’s been a big driver for folks is, “I can’t find another PM qualified. Maybe I find a junior PM, but how do I support him?” You can’t just give him a note pad and a pencil and tell him, go at it and talk to the 10 other PMs you got, because they’re all doing things differently. There is a way to solve that problem.

 

Mike Merrill:

It also to me, brings up another interesting point you just talked about, kind of these younger PMs are putting somebody in new. I continue to hear out there that there are less and less people entering the trades out of school, if they’re even going to school. The blue collar worker is going the way at the Dodo, it seems by statistic. We’re going to need, as an industry, to invest in tools that can replace the lack of people that we probably aren’t going to have moving forward.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

It’s really about automation, business process automation. So automate where you can in your processes and that’s what we help companies with a lot. Which is, this is a process we can automate, so we can free up people to do the things that we can’t automate today. Shifting people around organizationally to get better value out of them and taking away some mundane processes. Then again, you have to develop the tools for this market and industry, because the labor force is changing. It’s not a guy coming in saying, “I want to do this manual job or drive a backhoe.” You know, what’s real interesting, is flying a drone over my job site and tracking productivity that way or using it for security measures. The workforce is changing and they’re expecting some of these tools to be there. We really do need them to help recruit these people in.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I’ve got a daughter, she’s in ninth grade, she’s my youngest, even in elementary school, she was able to check her grades on a daily basis online. That’s all she’s ever known. I remember we’re a similar age I think, I remember not knowing until the day grades came out, necessarily what I was going to get because there was no-

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

All you get is a manila folder that the paper you pull it out. All the carbon copies that went to the parents and teachers and stuff.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re right. I think society, generally the youth, have been conditioned to not only be fluent with these applications and with mobile technology, they depend on it. They count on it and they expect it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Yeah. Scary enough, Mike. They don’t even do spelling tests anymore, because kids are all using technology and they’re not learning to spell. Everything-

 

Mike Merrill:

We all have spell check.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Auto-correct as you go. If you’re like me and I always encourage the field guys, I use the microphones. I’ve got big fingers. So if you can’t type it, do the speech to text.

 

Mike Merrill:

Perfect. Well, that’s great. I’ve had a great time talking with you. There’s a lot more we could dive into and we’ll have to try and schedule another call coming up and do some more of this. I guess before, as I kind of wind up here, one question I’d like to ask towards the end of these conversations is, what’s one hack or skillset or process, something that you’ve kind of learned through your years of experience, that you count on regularly, if you had a superpower, what’s that thing that makes you, Jeffery?

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

I think it’s understanding, I don’t know if it’s a super power as much as it is nose to the grindstone type thing, which says, “If we want to achieve X and Y, and that’s what we’re saying as a company, let’s work backwards from that to today and put a plan in place of everything we need to do to achieve that goal. Then let’s all agree on it and then commit to it, set measurable KPIs and hold each other accountable to achieve it.”

Just like software. It’s no magic bullet. There’s no magic bullet to success. It’s hard work. It’s planning for success and following the plan.

 

Mike Merrill:

I love it. Boy. Well said. That’s a great way to end. Thank you again for joining us today, Jeffrey. This is very enjoyable and I think not only the listeners, but myself, I gained some valuable insights from you, so I appreciate it.

 

Jeffrey Nesbitt:

Thank you and don’t forget that trademark, we’re splitting it 50/50.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sounds good. All right. Well, thank you to the listeners for joining us today on the Mobile Workforce podcast, sponsored by AboutTime Technologies and WorkMax. If you like the conversation Jeffrey and I had today, or were able to learn anything new and insightful, we encourage you to please follow us on Instagram at WorkMax underscore and subscribe to the show on iTunes or your preferred platform for listening to podcasts.

Also, if you enjoyed the podcast, please share it with your industry friends and leave us a five star review and rating, so we can continue to bring these valuable conversations to you and your organization to help improve your business and your life.

Large Construction Projects: How to Identify, Engage and Maintain Client Relationships

Large Construction Projects

Large construction Projects

Large Construction Projects: How to Identify, Engage and Maintain Client Relationships

Construction companies dream of securing large clients to increase their size and profits. But the process of identifying, engaging and maintaining those types of clients is easier said than done.

In part two of our conversation with the leadership team at KPost Roofing, CEO, Keith Post, President, Steve Little and CFO, Jayne Williams share what it takes to attract large clients and how companies can keep their clients happy. They discuss how they became the official partner of the Dallas Cowboys, as well as lessons learned on scaling their business up to meet the demands large projects require.

Key Takeaways:

  1. Prepare for the clients you want.  Be proactive in building a strong foundation for your business, so you can scale it when larger partners come on board. 
  2. Avoid distractions and focus on your vision. Don’t get preoccupied by what other companies are doing. Put your attention into your unique approach. If prospective clients don’t see a fit, then you’ll be leaving room for other clients that do. 
  3. Don’t underbid to try and win business.  It is more important to be accurate and timely at a large construction project’s end than to be underbid at the beginning of the project and have numbers rack up and surprise clients at the end. 

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Podcast Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello, and welcome to The Mobile Workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill, and today we are sitting down with Keith Post, CEO. Steve Little, President and Head Coach, and Jayne Williams, the CFO and safety manager of KPost Roofing out of Dallas, Texas. So for those of you that may not have heard our episode yet from last week, just wanted to get a brief background from KPost. So, how do each of you fit into the leadership, starting with Keith?

 

Keith Post:

I’m the CEO, and I work in a lot of different areas. I am over the service group right now, and the estimators, and I work with Steve in Sales. So I’ve got my fingers in a little bit of everything, and I help be strategic. So when we’re chasing large projects, I usually try and take somewhat of a lead or give direction to the team of how we’re going to be successful. Help just push everybody in the right direction so we present well. And then I also work in our educational side of the business, that’s really my passion, where I feel like we are giving back to our employees to help make them all better people, better co-workers and better people in their lives. 

 

Steve Little:

So I handle the business side of the business. I work in the sales side, I work with the project management team, the legal, banking, surety side of the business and the operations team reports to me as well. And I also am the interface for the industry, either involved with ABC, or NRCA, or Midwest Roofing Contractors, and I share some of the NRCA duties with Jayne. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Jayne, how about you? 

 

Jayne Williams:

I’m Jayne Williams, I’m CFO and safety officer. I do all the money and the fuel, as we call it, for the company. I also am the safety officer. I am an OSHA 500 trainer and we have from the very beginning had a strong focus on safety. It’s number one, get our guys home at night. I also started KPost charities and it’s a way for us to give back to the industry and the community that we live in. 

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s awesome. Well, it sounds like you’ve got the dream team put together, The trifecta. So today we wanted to talk a little bit about something that I think a lot of contractors really focus on and try and accomplish. I know, Keith, you mentioned you chase large projects. Something that I thought was interesting is I’m aware of your relationship at KPost with the Dallas Cowboys. How did you get that opportunity? Was it something that you deliberately pursued or was it just another project that you were just trying to win like normal? Or how did you guys land that opportunity? 

 

Keith Post:

Well, I don’t think we pursued being a partner with the Cowboys at first. But when they had, many people remember the old Texas state where the Cowboys started playing. We actually helped the city of Irving put together a spec and coat that building. And that’s when our relationship started. And Tom Williams, Jayne’s spouse, ran that project for us and created a great platform with the Cowboys and Manhattan Construction, who is a partner with the Cowboys. And from there, we were in our infancy, probably year two or three. And then when they put the new stadium out for bid, we went and presented there. And that’s where we put a strategy together, put a team together, and went and presented, and we were successful. And through that project, we got recognized by the general contractor as a leader just on that facility. During the construction of that project, Jayne’s team, her safety leader, Luciano Perez, ran the safety meetings for the project. For 1,500 people on a site, Luciano ran them. That’s pretty strong from a roofing contractor. 

We had our video done by the TV show Build it Better or… Build it Bigger. Which was pretty cool, which is out on the Internet. So we got some sea legs there. We were still in our infancy, probably five, six years old, on a project we probably had no business in doing in most people’s eyes. But we had a very, very strong team, a very tender team, and that led to us going further and we eventually became a partner with them. That’s not something that’s just to be sneezed about because you get vetted by the NFL. And we went through a process there. And today it’s actually led us to open up a residential arm. So it’s been a great success. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Steve, what about from your perspective? What was your role in kind of working with the Cowboys organization and procuring that opportunity? 

 

Steve Little:

Well, we have a tendency to do a lot of guerilla marketing. We had to be bigger than who we were when we first started. I can remember Jayne doing Excel spreadsheet brochures that she would draw pictures in on projects any of the 11 original employees that we started with were involved in, no matter what company that they were participating in before. And so we would print those off on our… we got a big fancy color copier with staples and collating and stuff like that. And so we’re big marketers. So when we got the coating job for the Texas Stadium, which is known as an icon all over the world, it’s a stadium that the hole was put in so that God could watch his football team play in. Big Texan type scenario. We promoted that, and then we had big thermometers on the roof while our guys were working and the television station could see them, and that kind of stuff. 

And so we would take that information and we would just plaster it all over the city. Well, I can remember when we started on Cowboys Stadium, it ended up being AT&T Stadium, we got the job, we started promoting it. Keith got a phone call one day. And it was from a senior vice president in charge of brand or marketing or et cetera, that he was coaching their kid in his club soccer team. And he was saying, “Hey Keith, who is this Steve Little guy in your company?” And, “He’s stepping on our marks. He’s pushing the envelope.” And Jayne had warned us that we would get a call like that one day because we had a tendency to push the envelope, drive 80 through a 15 school zone. 

And so they wanted to start talking to us because of the kind of quality work we did and the kind of branding that we were doing. And one thing led to another and we ended up hooked up together with each other. And it’s been a great ride. We’ve been successful in doing projects for Blue Star Development, which is the Jones family. We built their world headquarters from a roofing standpoint, the practice field. And it really kind of took this little old West Dallas company that just came out of the blue in 2004 and put us on the map in 2007 or 2006 with the Texas Stadium. And then 2007, eight, nine as we built the new stadium. And it’s been a ride the whole time. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, that’s no small feat to have your logo next to the Dallas Cowboys logo on it, which I’ve seen many times out there. So congratulations and kudos on really paving the way for success. And again, a story like that where, again, like you mentioned, you were just a small Texas company that probably was doing a job they didn’t belong on necessarily. 

 

Steve Little:

Well, what was interesting about that, and it was kind of fun because we won the project from the current partner that was out there, we were the final two people. And we show up with seven photos. And Jayne made sure we had our safety manager there, and we brought Tom Williams, who, by the way, although he has the great recognition of being Jayne’s significant other, he also has 28 years as a lieutenant commander in the Navy. So he’d rebuild nuclear power plants inside submarines and aircraft carriers, and Jayne suggested that we go grab him, and he had retired because we had this massive 121 steps. I remember I’ve walked it many times, from the bottom all the way to the top of Texas Stadium. And we needed somebody that had that wherewithal, somebody that could really understand the significance of an operational achievement like that, to be in the view of the public. That was the first real public project that we did. 

So we brought Tom and we brought the estimator, and we brought the project manager, and Keith and I went to the presentation and we took the Cowboys and the contractor from mobilization to demobilization. And it was supposed to be a 45-minute, we were there for two hours. I had a post-bid meeting and they told us that they were going to think about it for a month and then get back to us, but that we were a quarter-million dollars high. And that they want us to go back and really see what we could do to tighten that up on a four and a half million dollar project. And we got in the car and we were all feeling kind of good about it, but at the same time, we were like, we can’t get there. It’s not going to happen. So we’re kind of all a little sour mouthed on the way back, and the phone rings on the way back, and it’s the general contractor. And he said that it was very impressive and they want to go ahead and get us committed.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. 

 

Steve Little:

We were like “Oh, crap! We got it.”

 

Jayne Williams:

Exactly.

 

Steve Little:

You know? We felt good because they told us we were a quarter-million dollars high, because sometimes in the construction business you get a job and it’s a large project, and the first thing as the estimator you ask, what went wrong? What did I leave on the table here? What did I do? What more could I have done?

 

Mike Merrill:

What’d we miss? Yeah.

 

Steve Little:

And we’re all such cheerleaders, we want to high five each other. And hey, we have a mission, we had a goal, we had a plan. We accomplished it, we won the project. Well, no, our estimators are going, “Oh, what did I leave out? What did I do?” But we didn’t have that on the Cowboy project because they told us going in we were hired. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting. So, Jayne, I think your role in the background, possibly, was also a key factor. What did you find that was helpful that you were able to kind of help contribute, even if it was less front facing in that kind of project? 

 

Jayne Williams:

When we first got Texas Stadium I was scared to death. We have 35,000 cars that go past that icon every day. And the last thing I needed was something rolling off the roof or an employee falling off the roof. I think us being creative in the way that we did it and the way we did safety, and several people were fired for safety violations. And this kind of just said a lot for us that we got up on this project and we did it creatively as far as the way we stocked, how we’d lanyard our tools so that they wouldn’t fall out of someone’s pocket. And then really stayed on top of the project. We were always involved in it and we made sure that we were there for our customers as well as our employees. 

 

Steve Little:

But Mike, she said it right upfront. The minute we get a large project, she has a sick feeling in her stomach.

 

Jayne Williams:

Oh, I do. Big time.

 

Steve Little:

And it grounds us.

 

Keith Post:

So what we do is we have this imaginary Ferris wheel. We put Jayne on it, blindfold her and handcuff her, and say okay, trust us. Then we spin her. Then she comes out, and she goes, “Okay, okay, okay!”

 

Mike Merrill:

Now she’s dizzy.

 

Jayne Williams:

Exactly.

 

Keith Post:

It’s trust. It really is trust.

 

Jayne Williams:

I don’t think we’ve gotten a single project that I haven’t felt that pit in my stomach at that point. 

 

Steve Little:

Including our largest project that we’ve had in the history of the company, we just… Let’s knock on wood, Jayne, I’m knocking on wood. We just are in the probably first third of a 15 million dollar re-roof project on a high-profile client in the Dallas marketplace. The location isn’t high-profile, but the client is, and it’s a live building to where they make very sensitive items. So we did 14 million our second year in business and this project is 15 million dollars. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Amazing. So one thing I’m hearing is maybe order your shoes a size or two too large and and then work like crazy to grow into them. Is that some advice you might give? 

 

Steve Little:

And don’t forget to tie it around your leg and your ankle at the same time when you go to tie it in. 

 

Keith Post:

We want to make sure it fits. That we like that style. We want to make sure it’s our style. And so we stay within our lane. And we do check all the boxes. We make sure that when we’re dealing with a project, that our sales team is working the right people. And if we can take price out of the equation, we do. We feel like if we can sell the value of this company and the strength of our team, we’ll have the best shot because we’ve been branded well locally. We don’t travel a lot, but we’re well known in the metroplex. And it’s a good name. It’s a very strong name. So I think being proud of something, that’s one of the things I’m most proud of, is that across the board we have strong teams, and they love coming to work and trying to do their best. You can’t buy that. 

 

Steve Little:

You know, if it’s a high-profile project in town, we’re typically on it because we’ve put ourselves in that position. We’ve staged ourselves that you’re going to have fewer competitors on the larger projects, and you have to have the capacity to do it. And part of that capacity comes with the safety, having that safety record, having the financial wherewithal to be able to fund the project, having the capacity with surety if you need to bond it, and having the history of when something goes wrong, because things go wrong in construction, it’s what we did to fix it rather than what we say we’re going to do to fix it. 

And we try to align ourselves with credible clients, whether they be on the multi-facility side, health care, industrial manufacturing, or on the general contractor side, that they’re tier one generals or tier two that specialize in the specific area. And we just build relationships of trust. We not only have to have it with our employees, but we have to have it with our clients. We have to have it with our vendors. And it makes me think of the strategic partner dinner that we do every year, although this year we’re not able to because of COVID. When Jayne came up with the idea that we need to give back and we need to give thanks to the people that helped us get started, I looked at her like she had six eyes. I was like, “Jayne, these are the vendors. Okay? We but from them. We get business from them.” 

 

Keith Post:

And nobody else had done this. 

 

Steve Little:

Pulls me back by the back of my collar, sits me down, and said, “We built integrity with our employees. We have to do the same thing with our vendors.” And more times than not she was right. Right? 

 

Keith Post:

Yeah, it’s something that our partners look forward to every year. They don’t all get to know each other until this one meeting and now you have your surety, you have your attorneys, you have your top vendors. In the last few years we’d start bringing key employees who are part of the upper management and who make the same run. And I think it’s pretty a special meeting of the minds for that one evening and breaking bread. It’s something that not many people in many industries do. But it was Jayne’s idea. And as much as I fought it, taking somebody to this fancy steakhouse like we’ve been to and bringing 40 people there…

 

Steve Little:

74.

 

Keith Post:

Close. Close. I’m a guesstimator. 

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s the numbers guy. 

 

Steve Little:

I don’t pay the bill, then. At least I don’t write the check. 

 

Keith Post:

So it’s a special deal. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. I heard a few different things there that were impactful. The one thing that just keeps ringing through my mind is because of the integrity that you’ve established organizationally with your employees from the onset, with your customers, with vendors, it’s safe for you to have an event like that. You’re not hiding or trying to… You’re on top of your stuff, you’re paying your bills. You’re obviously going to get paid because of that same integrity. It just feels like you’ve kind of controlled variables that I think a lot of businesses struggle to gain control of. And so when things go wrong, the wheels fall off. 

 

Steve Little:

We can say that at year 17. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Right. 

 

Steve Little:

I will promise you that the first 10 years we pieced it together every week. Every week it’s a struggle, and our vendor community and our client community really partnered with us to put us in a position we’re in today. I was on the phone yesterday with one of our partners, and we’re trying to work through the pricing on a particular deal. And it’s a new area of business for us because in the distribution centers that are happening with all of these online retailers and folks that are building these brands and building these boxes, and all of these automotive centers to manage all of their delivery trucks and things like that. And clients that we’ve had for years that we’ve been working their office buildings and their industrial buildings are getting in this business and they’re asking us to come into that business with them. And it’s a very competitive, price-sensitive area, and so we’re evaluating it. 

And I was on the phone with one of the vendors and I said, “In order for us to be successful, we need to get to this price point.” And they said to me, they said, “The only reason that we were even working with you on this is we know that it’s not a collection issue, it’s not a problem issue with you and the general or you and the developer. That this is a very clean, smooth transaction. And that’s why we would do this.” And that was one of the finest compliments I think I’ve ever heard from any of the vendors, is that we had reached a point in our company and built that trust that they wanted to partner with us in a new area of business that was not very profitable for them either. But it was a large-volume play. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. Yeah, it just sounds like the fabric that you’ve kind of woven your business out of supports the other areas of the business. So I think, again, you’re on a very strong footing and you have a very firm foundation. And I love what you said, Steve, especially about you guys had to fight every day for the first 10 years to get to this point. But it sounds like you’ve continually iterated and tried to pivot and focus on your plan regardless of the situation, even if Jayne was panicking or worried about, “Oh no, famous last words, we just won the project!” And that doesn’t always go well. Sometimes you buy a job because maybe you did miss something. 

Steve Little:

Right. You know, I want to make sure that the listeners are clear that you see the success. You don’t see what goes on behind the scenes. And we have stubbed our toe many times. We’ve lost a good employee or two, or three, or five. We’ve gained a good employee or two, or three, or five. It’s not a perfect science. And anybody that tells you that you can read a Dr… I’m going to date myself, a Dr. Spock book to tell you how to raise a kid, well there’s not a perfect book out there that tells you, or a perfect podcast that’s going to tell you how to run a business. Because it’s just ever-flowing. Something different.

 

Keith Post:

Every day.

 

Steve Little:

I remember the first day I met you and our business director, and it was just a crazy day. I think we had not won a project we thought we were going to win at a previous company. And I was really down. I was like, “Is this what it’s going to be like?” And you walked in my office, and you said, “Tomorrow’s going to be a whole different day, and we’re going to have different opportunities.” And it’s been the truth for the 20 years we’ve been together. Every day is different. 

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s what makes it fun, right? 

 

Keith Post:

Yes. It’s a great business. It’s a great business. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Expecting the unexpected. Then you can be ready, right? 

 

Steve Little:

And it’s still a people business. There are 400 human beings in 200 different vehicles. In lifts, in cranes, in trailers. And it’s just every day they go out and they fight the fight. And we have the privilege of leading them and incubating them. I know that the three of us always talk about it as parental. And we really feel that this is our family. We built this. We started it. Let me be clear about that. We incubated. And the people that we brought on board have built it and made it into what it is today. And we work hard on keeping the train on the tracks.

Because it’s constant in different environments and different bends and turns no matter what. So I don’t want all of this success that we have and the brand that we’ve built, the reputation that we’ve had be distorted to the fact that we’ve stepped on our toes many times to get to this point. 

 

Keith Post:

We had no book. No road map. We had no walk into a business that was ongoing. We created everything from scratch. So that’s the satisfaction that you get. When you had to learn everything that you had to learn to run a business. Yeah, we asked a lot of people, we asked a lot of partners for advice. But looking back, the things that I did in my early career were so stupid. But I learned. There were a lot of them. And so what I said before about you have to make mistakes to get better. That’s what we’ve done. We squandered away lots of dollars, and it’s coming back to us now. We’re kind of in the good part of life. So it’s great to be able to have a team behind you that is so strong, that you’ve worked so hard to build. That’s a lot of satisfaction. Makes you be able to go home at night and sleep well. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, I’m hearing another theme of failing forward, right? 

 

Keith Post:

Yeah. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Failing forward. And learning from those mistakes. You’ve said that a few times. And I think that’s the challenge that, in life, we all face every day, is how do we get better? How do we learn from where we did fall short or we did stub our toe, like you’ve mentioned. But it’s nice to humanize this and, again, see and bring it back to the fact that it was 10 years of gutting it out every day that put you in this position to where now you have a little bit more control and you’ve built something that has momentum and probably can be maintained without quite so much heavy lifting, now that you’ve got some things established. But I don’t imagine you’re lightening the load too much. You’re probably working, like you said, harder today than ever. Is that right? 

 

Jayne Williams:

Exactly. 

 

Steve Little:

I had a client tell us one time the difference between KPost and other contractors is that we don’t try to BS them through a mistake. We will admit the mistake right up front, we will give them a solution for it, and then we will double down to execute it, to get it done. And it puts them in a comfort zone that they have a partner. That they don’t have a vendor. And it just changes the dynamic of a project that you’re working on. And we’ve had our mistakes. But we’ve also had a lot of big wins in fixing those mistakes. And because of the way we fixed those mistakes or handled the situation, we got another opportunity with them when they had another project to work on or they recommended us to somebody else. Or they left the company and went to work someplace else and called us back and asked if we want to be a part of this. And that’s that residual that businesses are built on. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Critical. We all depend on residual business in some form or another, because you just can’t reinvent yourself every single day to somebody new and not wear yourself out. 

 

Steve Little:

I remember when you got started. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. 

 

Steve Little:

And we try every software that comes out, and we tried yours, and it was light years ahead of everybody else, and somebody asked us about, “What are you guys doing for your taking your timekeeping for your groups,” and, “You’re modern, have you gone to any kind of digital platform?” And we said, “Hey, have you called Mike Merrill?” And one thing led to another and then when an opportunity presented itself on something that you found, you called us up and said, “Hey, you took a chance on me, I’m going to introduce you over here to this person.” And boom, look what happened. Look where we both are today. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And I love the words you’ve used about your clients. We feel like we’re a partner company. We partner with our customers. It’s a partnership. We’re both working together for a common goal. We want to help you be successful in your business. If you are, you’re going to grow, you’re going to be back next year, and so will we. And we’ll just enjoy the journey together and, like we’ve said before, that rising tide lift all the boats in the harbor. And that’s one thing as a software vendor or a roofing company, whatever business that the listeners are in, you have got to look at not only your customers as partners, but also, like you’ve mentioned so many times here on this call, your employees. They are business owners. They have ownership in their role in growing that business, and it sounds like the culture that you’ve created has allowed for them to take that ownership and feel that way. 

 

Steve Little:

You know, we’ve had some success with peer groups. 

 

Keith Post:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). 

 

Steve Little:

Jayne, I remember when you were leading the Timberline Users Group that you would collaborate with other folks that are in our industry and share practices. And I’m curious, Mike, do you do that in the software business? Do you guys have peers that you collaborate with that help you with your business? 

 

Mike Merrill:

We do. And we’re involved in some of those, we’re involved with CFMA, we’re involved with some of the AGC, and the ABC, and other organizations. We do webinars, we’ve done events. National Association for Women in Construction, and other things that don’t have anything directly to do with our business, but they’re supportive of the community that we serve, and we believe in those causes. We believe in higher education. And this podcast, we don’t do it to generate revenue. We’re doing it to help share wisdom and knowledge and insights so that others can hopefully take the ball where they’re at and move it forward down the field with greater success. 

 

Steve Little:

Well, we’ve actually talked to other peers in different cities, and they have ideas, things that have worked for them, and we’ve grabbed some of those and tried them. They don’t all work, and people have tried some things that we have, and it didn’t necessarily work for their culture. But I think we’re better for it because we’re sharing with each other to always try to get better. That’s something that you advocated. How do we always get to be better at what we’re doing? 

 

Keith Post:

Yeah, we do that a lot. I get a charge out of that. When we have 10 people or eight people on a call, and everybody’s talking about what software did you use? Or what’s your process taking the project from cradle to grave? And just seeing how people do that. Say, “Wow, that’s maybe a little tweak that we could do on ours.” And we do it with peer groups around the country. So there’s nobody local, so we’re really not giving anything up. We’re actually bare bones. We open up wide and say, “Here. Here’s us. This is what we do.” Or this problem we have. “You ever had that problem?” And yeah, it’s been very healthy. Very healthy. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, I would imagine you probably, on occasion, get more than you give in some of those cases. Where you learn, because you were vulnerable and open and additive to your community, you probably gained that insight from others that maybe you were able to use. 

 

Keith Post:

Yeah. The first time when you do that with a peer group and you start sharing these things, you’re like, “Oh man, I’m giving up my secret sauce.” And then you go, “Wow, they just gave me theirs.” And then that’s the bond that starts taking off. That’s when it’s like, “Here’s my stuff, man.” And they give you your stuff. And you go, “Man, I got this problem over here.” And they say, “Well, we had that problem. This is how we handled it.” And you learn so much from that. 

As an entrepreneur, there is no book to go read. You can go read a bunch of entrepreneur books, but life experiences are our book. And when you can share your life experiences with somebody who is doing the same thing as you as an entrepreneur in New York City or LA or Miami, and their market is a totally different world, but they run into the same issues we run into every day. Same issues. And how they handled it. You know? And those help. Those are healthy. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Hmm. So Jayne, from your perspective, you’re the one holding those purse strings and you’ve probably got the tiger paw that has to be defensive of those dollars sometimes. What’s your secret to your approach with that sacred money to make sure that you’re not putting it places where it’s not going to come back and grow? 

 

Jayne Williams:

I think the biggest thing for us is no matter what you face, whether it’s good or bad, it’s what you learn from that experience. We’ve had some catastrophes. Things that could really have set us back. And it’s the ability to get back up that next day and say, “It’s a new day and we’re going to do better.” And the same thing with money. You have your highs, your lows, you have your fear. You know, COVID hits, and all of a sudden people are like, “Well, we’re going to shut this job down, and we’re going to shut this job down.” And that’s scary. And you have to make sure that you have saved for a rainy day, or you need to make sure that you have a pool out there or maybe something else you could do while these jobs are shut down. 

And it’s all about just trying to do better and make the scary parts less scary or less frequent and the good things happen more often. And so we’ve had the high and low of money, and it’s just being the protector of your fate, I guess, is the best way to put it. Make sure that you’re doing it the best you can do every day. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, you’ve got short-term things like payroll that comes. It’s worse than death and taxes, it comes every week, right? 

 

Jayne Williams:

Exactly. Exactly. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Just always churning payroll out. And then you got the long-term stuff like the safety and other things you’ve invested in that have allowed you to have that longer stride as you continue forward in business.

 

Steve Little:

Well, I think it’s important to recognize that we have a group of seven mid-level managers that are either vice president or directors in our company that deal with the day-to-day operation of our business. And it frees us up to actually be a little bit more visionary and to mentor them to deal with the things that they don’t have the tenure or the business maturity to deal with yet because they just didn’t have the experience. And some of the folks that have been on this management team have been on for less than a year, and some have been managers with our company for eight-plus years. 

And all of them that are either directors or vice presidents have only had that officer role within the last three years. So that would be, we were 14 years running before we actually got additional officers in our company. So we would not be who we are today without our teams that are in place. And other leaders that are helping us get to where we need to get to. And so as we transition as a company, we’ll always have our fingers in it, because it’s just our personality, the three of us, to have our fingers in different things. But we also have to transition to empower them so that the company has some sustainability as we go forward. 

And I think that’s part of the stage we’re in right now, is we’ve got I up and running, and we’ve built a good brand, and we have a really good reputation for people and get it done. How do we now take it to that next stage? What do we do in the next five years that allows those leaders to grow and be empowered and to take this brand that we’ve built and make it even better? 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, so you’re talking about some kind of a succession plan so that all of this sweat, blood, and tears that you’ve poured your life into the last 18, 20 years continues forward. 

 

Steve Little:

Yeah, not as much as a succession of how to pass on the ownership, as much as it is to pass on the leadership. Us transitioning out of the business, the three of us, will happen on a natural basis. We’d like that to happen on the upside, and in a good tax position, as well. But that will all take care of itself. We’ve always said take care of the people, take care of the clients, take care of your strategic partners, and everything else will work out. And we’ve been fortunate enough to be able to do that. But it’s now where we put our energy to each of the leaders that report to us, and how we grow them. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So one thing I want to make sure we don’t miss out on talking about is the Super Bowl incident. So what can you share about that? Some people may not know about this story. I do just because of our relationship, and then of course I was interested in it after the fact. What can you share with the listeners about the Super Bowl incident? 

 

Steve Little:

Well, we knew they were going to have a problem when the temperature inside the stadium was higher than the temperature outside the stadium and they were accumulating ice over the three days prior to the Super Bowl. And so we called out to the stadium, it was about eight o’clock, seven o’clock Friday morning, and said, “You’re going to have some problems here, and we think we can help you navigate those.” And they were like, “Well, we’re looking at it right now, and we’ve got the fire department here to figure out how we can take the ice off the stadium.” And we’re just thinking, “You have the fire department with axes on guys that have not been on roofs, and they’re going to handle the problem with it.” 

“Well, just kind of call us if you need us, and we’re here.” And an hour later, Keith gets a call, and it’s like, “How fast can you get here?” 

 

Keith Post:

That was pretty interesting. You show up and the NFL takes over the stadium. All the people that we had dealt with that were Cowboys personnel had stepped aside. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. 

 

Keith Post:

And you almost felt like you were walking into an FBI office. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Oh, wow. 

 

Keith Post:

And it was very intense. And our team went to work, and by then the fire department had started their process of readjusting the roof, let’s just say. With axes. They had shut down. At a Super Bowl event, you have tents all the way around the stadium, and everything was shut down. They had nothing going on. So their revenue source was going out of the window fast. And our people were up there that morning, and they worked around the clock until Sunday morning, about 10 or 11, when they walked off that roof. And they got applause because they were up there getting the ice off the roof. When these chunks of ice came down the side, I remember somebody saying it was the size of a Volkswagen. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. 

 

Keith Post:

That a chunk of ice would roll down the side of this roof, and they have a gutter system around the edge of this roof, it’s about, I don’t know, four foot wide and four foot deep. And these chunks of ice would hit that thing at a high force and explode. And ice chunks would go everywhere. It was very dangerous. Anyway, our team got it done, and we had to end up going back after the Super Bowl and we were there probably for a month fixing the damage. It was a pretty intense deal. But we got through it and we helped the Cowboys out. 

 

Steve Little:

I remember this story of them talking about when they arrived at the stadium and got into the bowels of the stadium into the command center. And they walk into the room, and just imagine the Red Sea parting because the roofers are there. Now, come on, Mike. Roofers show up and Homeland Security is getting out of the way, the police department’s getting out of the way, and the FBI was there. The National Guard was there. And, of course, the firemen were there. And the sea opens up, and here come the roofers coming through. It just reminds me of the days of fixing the oil fires that are out there. And our team just, they did a great job. 

 

Keith Post:

Yeah, they did. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Like Moses parting the Red Sea. 

 

Jayne Williams:

It is, it was. It was like, oh my goodness, I’m scared. We even had the assistant director of OSHA there. We had anyone and everyone that you could think of to be there. I think it just showed we were the subject matter expert on that job. I’m not trying to be cocky or anything, but we were the ones that needed to be called, and we knew what needed to be done, and-

 

Steve Little:

Jayne, God doesn’t like cocky, Jayne.

 

Jayne Williams:

I know. I had to remember that. That’s why I said I’m not cocky, but we were the subject matter expert on this one thing. And it helped the Cowboys, and we did it safely. Again, that is the most important thing, that nobody hurt, no one slid off a roof, or the fireman didn’t slide off the roof with his axe. So it’s all good. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, I remember thinking, with my construction background, I remember when that was going on, and that’s what I was afraid of. I thought here’s this high-profile project to begin with anyway, it’s the football stadium of football stadiums on planet Earth, and the biggest game of the year, the biggest sporting event of the year, and so hundreds of millions, maybe, eyeballs on this. The last thing anyone needed, especially KPost, was a safety incident or anything that could negatively shine on all this hard work that you’d done. So I imagine, Jayne, you were pretty stressed. 

 

Jayne Williams:

Oh, yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Being in charge of safety. 

 

Jayne Williams:

I was. Yeah. That made for a lot of fun that weekend. But, again, I knew our guys would do whatever they could to be safe and I remember them walking off the roof and telling me, “Hey, we got to hear the Black Eyed Peas.” You know, they got to hear them, we heard them while they were rehearsing. So we did what we needed to do. 

 

Mike Merrill:

All right, so Jayne, obviously we’re talking about safety with the Cowboys stadium and the roof incident with the Super Bowl. What about on the financial side? What do large projects look like from your perspective of planning financially? 

 

Jayne Williams:

I think the biggest thing for us is to… We have become fairly good, very good, I think, as Keith had pointed out, that we’ve formed this team. And from the very beginning of the bid process, safety’s involved and operations is involved. And we make sure that we have the most accurate bid, but we also are prepared internally for any financial… We may be doing business with a new vendor, they have a special product they want to use. Maybe they don’t have terms, maybe they want to be paid the day we order the materials. Things like that that we want to know upfront so we can plan for them. And so that’s what we do is we plan for them. But we, from the very start, we make sure that we are able to determine as many surprises as possible so that we can plan for them. 

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great. Great advice. I think, kind of winding down a little bit, one thing I wanted to ask, just, and this is for anyone, so what is maybe a misstep or a job that went bad or a challenge that you had that you eventually overcame, and what did you do to overcome it? Is there anything you can share as an example? 

 

Steve Little:

How much time do we have? 

 

Mike Merrill:

Just pick one. 

 

Jayne Williams:

I guess you could pick the sheet metal color in…

 

Steve Little:

Oh, the very first sheet metal job that we did, Jayne. Keith loves this story. 

 

Keith Post:

We don’t want to talk about this. I’ll talk about it. So we did a job, and it was a high-profile standing seam high rise. And we ordered the product, I ordered the product, and it was stone gray instead of ash gray. And we should have put the ash-gray on. So we shipped all the panels, fabricated them, did half of the job, and there happened to be a sister building next door. And the owner of the building shows up and says, “Hey, it’s the wrong color.” And it was about 30, 40,000 square foot job.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. 

 

Keith Post:

And what we did do is the general contractor called us and said, “This has got to come off.” And we said, “You know what? We made a mistake. These panels will come off today, and the new ones will be here as soon as we can get them,” which was in three days. And we did that. We took that hit, and whereas we could have sat and tried all kinds of negotiating ploys and tried to fix this or fix that, and in reality, when we had two sister buildings sitting side by side, it just hit us. We made a mistake. We have to fix this. And it can’t be a drawn-out situation. We’re holding up construction on the high rise, and so we did it. We bit the bullet. 

We took the panels off, bought the new panels, and we still have a relationship with that customer. So we did the right thing, unfortunately. I have a beautiful beach house on the Texas coast that has these beautiful ash gray panels on it.

 

Steve Little:

We moved those panels half a dozen times. From when our first building to the building that we’re in now. But it was doing the right thing that came back to us. And that project manager today, of that project, whenever he has another project, he always wants to find out where we are, because that’s part of getting it done. 

 

Keith Post:

That’s integrity. That’s standing behind what’s right and wrong. And sometimes you make mistakes, and you learn from those mistakes. So I know the difference in ash gray and any other kind of gray now. 

 

Steve Little:

And it really was, instead of being oh three one, it was an oh three two item, and we just put oh three two into the submittal process, oh three two into all of it. But when they went back and compared the submittals to what was in the spec, we had submitted it wrong, the GC had approved it incorrectly, and it really should have been the three one number. But we fixed it, did it right, and they’re still a client today. 

 

Keith Post:

That was a long time ago. 

 

Steve Little:

That was like 2005. 

 

Keith Post:

That was early days. 

 

Steve Little:

But even more recently, we’ve just finished phase three of a highrise project. We did phase one and it was not successful for us. It was convoluted, we wanted it so bad we priced it aggressively in the labor, we had a very tough… It was a three-phase project and we had a different operations team from the general contractor on the project, three different operations teams that were not in sync with what they’re doing. It was just a cluster. And we didn’t make any money on that project. You’re talking millions of dollar project that, Mike, you used to be in the general contracting business, or in any of the new ventures that you make doing the software side of it, you at least expect to make some kind of profit. 

We just traded dollars, and it went on forever, and it tied up our crews that make money on projects, and it was a real lesson to learn. So when we priced phase two of the highrise two project, we were three-quarters of a million dollars high. And our competitor got the project. And our competitor stepped all over themselves and had that same operations teams to deal with, and they went south. They had all sorts of problems with the assembly of the roof, to this day there’s still water in the system. And there’s some kind of, I don’t know if it’s gone to legal or what the deal is, but there’s a problem with phase two. 

So when we bid on phase three, they were glad to take us at the price point that we had and, knock on wood, phase three was successful. But you have problems and you take risks, and that’s what we do every day. We have a very high-risk business with a very low margin, and they hold more than our profit in retainage. It’s like, “What the hell are we in this business for?” Well, because we are just so blessed to have 400 employees and great employees that help lead this group, and great strategic partners like yourself, and we just have been very fortunate to be successful. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. All right. So kind of wrapping up, I think we’ve heard so many wonderful things today, very much appreciate all of your time and the opportunity to go through this discussion and share best practices. But I think to wrap up, Jayne, I just wanted to ask you, if there’s kind of a secret sauce or something that you really focus on and have learned from in your business career, what would that be and how can you share how that might help somebody else? 

 

Jayne Williams:

I think the most important thing for me has always been that if you’re going to be the leader of a company that you remember what’s important. And that means your employees are valuable. They’re the boots on the ground, and they’re the ones that do it for you. And also that when you pick the people that you want to be in business with, like I am in business with Steve and Keith, that you are with people that you share the same dedication. These two men are fantastic. They are brilliant and they are forward-thinkers, and I have learned more than I probably can even remember from these two. And it’s important that when you’re doing this, you need to have that family that you all work together. So that really has been very beneficial to me. Best job I’ve ever had in my life, and I think it’s because from top to bottom, it is all about how we treat each other. 

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s wonderful. Well, thank you so much, and I can see why you feel that way, and after 18, 20 years working together you still feel that way. Partnerships are tough, but obviously you all have very aligned common goals and work ethic, and I’ve appreciated this conversation and the opportunity to speak with you all today. 

 

Jayne Williams:

Thank you. 

 

Steve Little:

Thanks Mike, thanks for the opportunity. 

 

Keith Post:

Thanks, Mike. You have a good one. 

 

Mike Merrill:

Thank you all. If you enjoyed the conversation today and liked what you heard or were able to learn anything new or helpful in your business, please subscribe to the podcast and give us a five-star rating and review. You can also follow us at WorkMax_ to learn about our upcoming insightful conversations with other guests and companies like KPost. Thank you all, and we’ll catch you on the next one. 

Not all Time Tracking Integrations with Construction Accounting Systems or ERPs are Created Equal

WorkMax Not all Accounting Integrations Are Created Equal

WorkMax Not all Accounting Integrations Are Created Equal

Not all Accounting Integrations with Employee Time Tracking Solutions are Created Equal
By: Mike Merrill, COO 

Activity-based cost coding is mission-critical for your construction company. Accurate time and cost tracking help you manage costs, identify profit centers within your business, and sets you up for sustained growth for the future. Are you tired of spending all of your time reallocating costs on projects because employees are reporting time on the wrong projects and assigning the wrong tasks or cost codes? Wouldn’t it be nice to have job or project-restricted cost codes based on the actual scope of work instead of just a full list of all the possibilities for employees to select on their time sheets or daily field log reports? Many cost accountants and project managers get frustrated that they have meticulously organized and logical project cost accounts set up based on the specific scope of the work and it seems that they can never get the labor hours or completed work to the right cost centers without a considerable amount of manual intervention.

There is now a way to make sure that all of the correct project labor costs and completed work feed directly into your detailed project cost accounts into your accounting system or ERP. You did all the hard work initially, making sure that the project cost accounts are based on the scope of work with only the relevant cost codes. When you’re partnering with an employee time tracking software vendor, you want to make sure that their product truly integrates with your accounting system or ERP, so that all of your actual costs are perfectly aligned with all of your project cost accounts. Because all integrations are not created the same, you want to make sure that you select a product that honors the structure you have set up in your accounting software to achieve the most accurate daily job costs while you also minimize reallocations or adjustments once the data comes in from the field.

The most important first step in achieving accurate job costs is selecting an employee time tracking solution that has true facial recognition to make sure the right employee is clocking IN/OUT of jobs. You will want true facial recognition that doesn’t just take pictures and force you to manually compare photos to see if it is the same person. True facial recognition compares IN/OUT photos with a source image and then automatically provides you with a match percentage between two photos. It also alerts you when the match percentage falls below your predetermined acceptable match threshold. By using facial recognition, you not only make sure the right employees are clocking IN/OUT of jobs; you can also see the true cost savings that are realized. Archer Mechanical saved over $141,440 in the first year using facial recognition and by tracking employee’s time in real time rather than having supervisors clock in their whole crew.

WorkMax Google Chrome 2019 04 04 15.55.21

On the left, the Clock IN photo is over a 98% match to his profile photo on the far right and his Clock OUT photo is over a 96% match. If the match was less than the acceptable 80% threshold, you would be alerted.

Now that you have confirmed that the right employee is clocking into the right job, you’ll also want to select an employee time tracking solution that allows you to capture your employees’ completed work progress easily in the same app as their employee time tracking. Here are the Top 10 Reasons to Track Production in Your Time App. With this solution in place, there are no additional reports to fill out when you’re tracking production units in the same app as your employee time tracking solution. Employees are prompted to enter their completed work as they are switching tasks throughout the day. If you only want completed work calculated at the end of the day, make sure you find a time tracking solution with multiple workflows to allow you to capture their completed work in real time or at the end of the day or week. To make sure your actual completed work matches up to the remaining work that needs to be completed in your accounting system, you also need a solution that allows you to personalize the units of measure to make sure your actual unit of measure fits your business and matches up to the budgeted amount of completed work in your accounting system planned for the project. This way you always know you’re comparing apples to apples for the same tasks and it all rolls up nicely into your accounting solution.

Now that you know the right person is Clocking IN/OUT of a job or project and capturing completed work, the next step is to simplify how the data is presented to your employees so that they can quickly and accurately assign their labor costs and completed work to the right project and the relevant cost codes or tasks as they are completing the work. You’ll want the flexibility to allocate labor hours and tasks or cost codes in real time or after the fact or a combination. Also, your company might have hundreds of project cost accounts or cost codes. When employees have too many options to select from when they Clock IN/OUT, the likelihood for mistakes that you’ll have to reallocate is pretty high.

Permission Profiles Connect Max Import Concrete Employees Cropped

With WorkMax’s ConnectMax integration with your accounting system, you can easily import your concrete employees into WorkMax to set up permission profiles to automatically show your concrete employees just the concrete jobs and cost codes for accurate job costs in real time.

 WorkMax Employee Record with Concrete Projects

 John S. Intendant is in the concrete department and he only has permission to see concrete-related jobs. Once the permission profile is set up, every time you add a new concrete department employee, concrete job, or concrete cost code, it will automatically be added to all the concrete employees.

 WorkMax Some Concrete Tasks Assigned to Concrete Project

In the third section, you will see a list of all concrete tasks and only some of them are selected. Permission Profiles allow you to pre-assign tasks or cost codes based on your scope of work for the job to get more accurate job costs.

Although getting one employee with 100% perfectly accurate job costs is great, but it would be far more beneficial if you could get almost 100% accuracy for all of your employees’ time tracking and job costs along with all of their completed work. In order to accomplish this, you need to make sure that you present the right data to the right employees on the right job. Automated permission profiles mimic your accounting software so that all existing and future employees assigned to a department or specific role can only clock into their assigned jobs or cost codes. By automating these permission profiles coupled with true accounting software integration, the process of getting the right employees entering the right job cost information is streamlined, while all of the data integrity is maintained according to your accounting system’s project cost and organizational structure.

To see a list of the WorkMax integrations with videos to show you how easy it is to integrate WorkMax with your accounting solution or ERP, click here. Check out how easy it is to honor your accounting system’s project cost and organizational structure to get the right data to the right people at the right time by automating permissions, click here.

 

 

WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS Enriches Integration with Top Construction Accounting Systems and ERPs

PRESS RELEASE Permission Profiles

PRESS RELEASE Permission Profiles

WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS by AboutTime Technologies Enriches Integration with Top Construction Accounting Systems and ERPs

Clones accounting system project cost and organizational structure for accurate daily job costs to minimize reallocations with Permission Profiles

(Payson, UT – May 14, 2019) AboutTime Technologies, a 16-year veteran of on-premise and cloud- based mobile resource management, today announces that it has expanded its integration with the top construction accounting systems and ERPs with WorkMax TIME, FORMS, and ASSETS. WorkMax is an easy-to-use cloud-based platform for employee time tracking, mobile forms, and asset tracking that allows project-based businesses to manage each of their mobile resources all in one place.

Permissions Profiles allow businesses to accurately track daily job costs and drastically reduce reallocations or adjustments to job costs after-the-fact. Permission Profiles allow users to create a unique profile with a set of individual permissions that can automatically be assigned to new employees. Most project-based businesses have hundreds, if not thousands of cost codes or tasks to track a project’s job costs and completed work. Permission Profiles determine what employees see when they’re entering their completed work and labor hours. This ensures that they are assigning their labor to the right jobs, projects, locations, tasks, cost codes, or assets. With Permission Profiles, employees can only select tasks or cost codes that are part of the appropriate project cost structure based on what’s been set up in the business’ accounting system or ERP.

Permission Profiles can also restrict which mobile forms are visible to employees in the WorkMax application. Only the employees that need to complete the mobile forms are able to view them and saves the employee’s time instead of searching for the mobile forms they need to complete. Permission Profiles can be set up to automatically apply permissions to track more than employees, jobs, cost codes/tasks, devices, assets, and forms by creating or importing custom list items. Custom lists provide businesses with the flexibility to track whatever they need. Examples of custom lists include employee leave codes, certified classes, or per diem allowances.

“We kept hearing that project-based businesses spent too much time reallocating job costs due to data entry errors by field employees. The bigger the list of jobs or cost codes the more adjustments they had to make in their accounting system or ERP. Also, the project job costs and completed work was always out-of-date. We looked at the data visibility goals that our customers wanted to achieve in their accounting systems and ERPs for job cost accuracy and mirrored those options in WorkMax. With Permission Profiles, we gave them an easy way to get the right data to the right employees at the right time for real-time accurate project job costs,” said Ryan Remkes, chief executive officer of AboutTime Technologies.

WorkMax has powerful and robust integrations with the top construction accounting and ERP systems including:

For a full list of all of the accounting, ERP, payroll, and HR systems that WorkMax integrates with click here. To learn more about WorkMax’s Permission Profiles, click here to view the video.