Successfully Marketing Your Construction Business on Social Media

Construction leaders know a lot about the art of construction. But marketing a construction company? That’s a whole different story. Promoting a construction company can be challenging, especially in today’s competitive market where the landscape is often flooded with advertisements and noise. That’s why companies are increasingly thinking outside the box – and their tactics may surprise you.

Dillon Hales, the owner of Yeti Welding, joins the Mobile Workforce Podcast to share how marketing his construction business on social media helped him build his welding company from the ground up. They discuss different ways to leverage social media, including building trust with general contractors, raising brand awareness to attract new prospects and strengthening relationships with current customers. In this episode, Dillon also dives into speed bumps he’s encountered and how you can start using social media to grow your business today. 

 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Show off your difficult jobs on social media. Whether it’s Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or LinkedIn, social media is all about grabbing the attention and imagination of your potential clients. Putting up pictures that anyone can get won’t do the job. Look for the opportunities that will get the wheels turning in the client’s head and spark their interest.
  2. Getting started is as easy as pulling out your smartphone. Putting quality images and posts on social media might seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t take a team of experts – simply pull out your iPhone. The camera on any current smartphone is more than capable of capturing the right images. Start taking shots and you will quickly learn what looks good and what doesn’t. 
  3. When the camera comes out, job site safety actually increases. Pictures are worth a thousand words, and that goes for double on the job site. OSHA and other safety organizations do monitor pictures posted on social media and will look for safety violations. But don’t let that scare you. Think of it as an opportunity to increase safety on the job site while increasing your marketability. Everyone on the job site benefits from the cameras coming out because it requires everyone to confirm that the job is being done safely.

 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to the Mobile Workforce podcast. I’m your host, Mike Merrill and today we are sitting down with the Dillon Hales, the owner of Yeti Welding. How are you doing today Dillon?

 

Dillon Hales:

I’m doing really good. Thanks for letting us come out. It’s a little bit hard getting everything set up. I kind of come with baggage, I guess I could say.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well we all do, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Thanks for inviting us man.

 

Mike Merrill:

Happy to have you here. This is fun. A little different format for us too, so excited to do this today.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

So a little bit about Dillon, and I’ll let you tell your own story but basically Dillon grew up on a farm. Being on a farm, had to learn how to weld and probably weld well or your dad would kick your butt up and around your shoulders, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Right.

 

Mike Merrill:

So that part of it you nailed but then you had to find a way to accelerate your business and really learn how to grow that footprint and find success. What Dillon did that’s really unique and that I don’t see a lot of yet, I think it’s catching on and companies are starting to try and do this better, but Dillon used social media to really grow that business more rapidly than just doing a good job at welding. Is that right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. Yeah, for sure. You’re spot on. I guess I could give you a little bit more background of what you just said. The first time I ever received money for welding, they’re a local grain dispensary here, called me up and said, “Hey, we need something to be welded on a forklift.” I welded it and they said, “Well how much do we owe you?” and I’m like, “I don’t know. We’ll catch you on the next one.” Do a good turn deed daily on the farm. It was always like that. They’re like, “No, we’ll get you some money. Should we write a check to you?” and I was like, “Please, I don’t need any money. You guys do great for us.” I told them just give me $50 would be good. I was there for five hours. I’m 14-15 years old.

 

Dillon Hales:

Anyway, he brought me out a check for $250 and that’s when I was like, “Whoa. I can make money as a welder?” And that’s where it all sparked from there, kind of evolved into getting into the welding and stuff. I just knew I needed to be a little bit more loud in the welding because I was super young when I got into welding. I just escalated from there and I did my great success in using social media to get where we’re at.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice. Did you learn most of that in shop or was it just on the farm?

 

Dillon Hales:

The weld skill?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

When I grew up, we had an old 1971 miller welder. It didn’t even have the dial on it to control your head. You had to plug it out and plug it into a different port for as far as the heat. My grandpa had this old welding hood from Geneva Steel from way back when and when you weld, I didn’t know you could actually see what you were looking at. I didn’t.

 

Mike Merrill:

Oh, okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Until I went to high school and I took a welding class and they had these brand new auto-darkening helmets and I could weld and I could see the puddle. I was like holy crap. I went home and told my grandpa. I was like, “Grandpa, did you know you could see the weld puddle?” He was probably just like well I probably just cleaned the lens out in the hood. But he’d built up that excitement and was like, “What do you mean?.” So to answer your question, I learned on the farm but I didn’t know you could actually see. I thought you had to weld by Jedi force.

 

Mike Merrill:

You feel the weld.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, you could kind of see this orange glow and then I got to high school and I was like whoa, you could actually see the puddle and the metal form together. That’s when it escalated and I really took hold of it in high school. Sean Black was the teacher there. He’s now teaching at Payson and he helped me understand the principles of welding.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Right out of high school, there was a company looking for experienced welders. Me and my friend just applied for it as a joke, “Hey we got experience. We’ve got seven years of experience. We’ve been welding since we were 14.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

So we applied and they laughed at us when we went in, this big company. Anyway, we did a weld test. They’re like, “Hey, if you guys can pass a weld test we’ll send you on the road.” We passed the weld test and a week later I hit the road and I did a lot of on-the-job learning that way and hit the pipelines for about five or six years. I didn’t want to travel as much so that’s why I settled. For the most part I’d say I learned most of my welding principles from the farm and honed them in through high shool. I didn’t take any trade classes or technical training.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right. On-the-job.

 

Dillon Hales:

Just high school and then on-the-job, yeah. Most stuff in welding needs to be done on the job. You can learn a lot in the trade schools and get your principles right where they need to be but as it escalates, to gain the majority of the knowledge that you need at skill, it’s got to be done in the field. There’s just no other way around it. Yeah, that’s how I got into it. I don’t know why I stuck with it to make money. I went to college. I was in college two years and then one day I told my wife, “I just want to be a welder.” I got a D on my business plan for my business class and it was on a welding company.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

I was just like, “I’m making $40,000-$50,000 part time going to school. How much could I make if I was full-time? I was making great money on the pipeline welding and I knew if I could just do it on my own, struggle for a couple years, that maybe we could make something out of it. I never thought it’d be what it is today.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. So you were getting a D in college but an A on the job, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

I guess. I hope I was getting an A. I don’t know.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well you’re here, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re still rolling.

 

Dillon Hales:

Right. We’re still rolling six years later. This is year six welding for us.

 

Mike Merrill:

Cool.

 

Dillon Hales:

Completely debt free in our company too.

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you man.

 

Dillon Hales:

I want to make that known. That we just literally didn’t take a dime from anybody. We started from a 2-wheel drive Ford Ranger and a 1971 Miller Welder. Now we have four employees and I have six welding trucks and 12 welders. I do have a problem with buying too many welders. That is a problem.

 

Mike Merrill:

You need to get some guys for those if you can find them.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, if I can find guys. Growing up, if you have a nice engine drive welder or in any shop they’re always like, “Man, if only I had an engine drive welder I could make it. I could make it.” Every time I see a good deal on the classifieds for a good welder I pick it up. Just stock them up. That’s how I got into welding and here we are. We started originally welding decorative ornamental iron, when I started on my own.

 

Mike Merrill:

Railings and stuff like that?

 

Dillon Hales:

Railings and decorative stuff. I knew it was a lot lower entry point versus doing big commercial projects. Then I just built it off of that one tool at a time. Now there’s a lot of different ways I do it now but that’s how it started. That’s how I got into welding and here I am. Just a dirty welder.

 

Mike Merrill:

You clean up nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

It’s funny, Mark’s like, “How come you look all dolled up?.” I’m like, “What? I always wear this.” He’s like, “No, that’s a new shirt,” and I’m like, “Well yeah, I didn’t want to have holes and stuff all over my shirts everywhere.” Show up to you guys’ nice castle here. Maybe if we were at the shop I would’ve had on my holy shirts but since we were able to do this in person, unlike the other podcast, I was like, “I’ll throw on a fly shirt.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice. You look like you’re ready to go to a wedding.

 

Dillon Hales:

I know, right? Give it a couple months and this’ll have holes in it. Burn marks all on the chest. I’ll have UV fade on the right-hand because that’s where you hit the weld. My left arm will be perfectly the same color and the UV will be all faded on this side.

 

Mike Merrill:

I like it.

 

Dillon Hales:

Then you’ll see me in the gas station and be like, “Is that guy… Who is that?”

 

Mike Merrill:

Who is that kid?

 

Dillon Hales:

Some people’s children, you know?

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s funny. So tell me, you start real young. You came essentially from your farm and from some high school welding, essentially. How did you go from that to getting the kind of camera angles and video footage and shots and things that you do. Because you’ve got a really cool… your Instagram page especially is very entertaining, it’s fun to watch. I’m a construction guy, my trade historically, but it’s just enjoyable to watch you guys on your lives. You’re up in that tower welding stuff, craning people up, and doing funny, crazy things. You film that yourself? How did you catch that footage?

 

Dillon Hales:

How it started, I didn’t think I would push social media as hard. In the beginning, I worked in a shop where everybody was always complaining about the boss. Everybody wanted to change stuff in the shop and nobody was willing to go off on their own. I went off on my own but like I said I’m just starting, young kid. I’m young right now and I look young but when I shave and clean up really nice, you’ll still think I was in junior high. I got that effect when I wanted these big job sites. I thought the only way to get work was to go onto a construction site and get the work. So I’d go with my two-wheel drive Ford Ranger and my little welder and I’d go to a construction site and I’d be looking around, looking around… This is me at 19-20 years old.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’m looking and be like, “Who’s the superintendent? Can I talk to the superintendent?” and I’d find the GC on the site and I’d say, “Hey, I’m Dillon. I do welding.” They’d look at me and then they’d look at my truck and they’re like, “We got some stuff going on.” I could tell that they needed structural iron in the house and they needed some handrails but I could tell the feel. When I’d meet those GC’s on the project that they were like, “I can’t give…”

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. You’re not welding my stuff.

 

Dillon Hales:

What kind of credibility is his high school dude? He’s rolling up in this two-wheel drive Ranger. I beat my head against the wall trying to get these general contracts to see me. How do I tell them that I grew up on a farm that on the farm you have to fix and solve problems and I’ve been doing that for already years. Although young, most farm kids will attest that you do everything. You do everything. How do I convey that to these GC’s that I’m meeting and say, “Although I and my crew could be young, we can handle your project.”

 

Dillon Hales:

I knew that the only way it was going to do that is to slip into their bedroom at night, when they’re scrolling through social media, Facebook, when they’re scrolling through LinkedIn, when they’re scrolling through Instagram and all of a sudden they see me in that same two-wheel drive Ranger but doing something else. That’s free time to enter into that GC’s head. When I’m on the construction site, when I was just there trying to get his business, it wasn’t working. I started my Facebook with just some really ugly, not very glamorous shots at all. Of just some handrails, but I was getting comments on my Facebook page from local people saying, “Hey, I saw that you did a handrail. Can you do mine?.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

Then it just went from one project to the next and as I took pictures and built more of a social media portfolio, it just grew and escalated. That’s when my eyes started opening, when people were contacting me through Facebook saying, “Hey, we live in Santaquin… We need this” that’s when I need to figure out how to do this more because none of the shops around in Utah County were doing that. There’s a lot of startups and a lot of dudes I could call out here on the podcast. They were doing the same but we were all figuring it out at the same time.

 

Mike Merrill:

It was new.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, it was new.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

It was new at the time but I could see that if I was going to be in it and in a trade, I wanted to have the loudest shtick.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

So even though I look young when I roll up on the job site, even if I’m in a brand new Ford or that old two-wheel drive Ford Ranger, that the generals would be like, “Those guys, I’ve seen what they can do.” Not just judge me from the very beginning. That was my take off and then the social media just evolved from there.

 

Mike Merrill:

I’ve seen your content evolve and obviously your projects have gotten more complex and bigger. You’re doing some more cool things, so to speak. How have you had to adapt your approach to capture that content for social media out on the job site in order to continue to display that in the best light possible?

 

Dillon Hales:

As we were capturing content social media, it became a saying in our shop that we’re not a welding company. We’re a photography company.

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

We want to take pictures of the cool stuff we’re doing. After we did the handrail game, everyone’s doing handrail around because of how much construction is going on around here. A lot of iron needs to go into the homes so what would set us apart from the other companies? We like doing handrail, we enjoy it, there’s money in it, but we don’t like and we don’t enjoy it at the same time. It’s a love-hate relationship. So then we only want to take pictures of the cool handrails. We’ll only post pictures of the cool stuff. Then me and McKay, I think it was about the time we met Ryan, one of the founders here at WORKMAX, that we only want to take pictures of cool stuff. We said that and we turned down a lot of projects actually because it wasn’t quote-unquote cool.

 

Mike Merrill:

It wasn’t as marketable, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. We didn’t want to do it because we wanted a cool picture. We wanted a floating staircase.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

So then as we started doing that and we literally made it a mentality of we have to want to take a cool picture. We molded it into that. That was what set us off but it’s not what we go off of now. Now we go off of, we’re going to still take on any projects that we can and do them, because we’re bigger, we have larger infrastructure, but we’re going to post the coolest ones obviously. We do post a lost bet or whatever. We didn’t win on this one. We bad weld this valve.

 

Mike Merrill:

Which is good, right? The authentic content that’s real.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

People appreciate that. Every job isn’t amazing.

 

Dillon Hales:

No, no. Right, right. And off that same note that you mention, Mike, people want to see their own projects on your own stuff. People took that to heart. When they’d have us do a project for them, they’d see us posting it on our stories and stuff, they could see their project in the shop. That meant a lot.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

And it does. It’s cool. It’s cool. So then that helps propel what our agenda is in doing projects because more people, even if they pay more or less, they just want to see their own project on somebody else’s page.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure. They’re proud of it, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Ryan showed us his barn, the beams, the different decorative iron, the doors, the gates, all of that stuff. Guess what? We thought it was awesome. Wow, that’s really cool.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. The homeowners aren’t going to take a picture… You’re living in the same cul-de-sac, right? I remember I saw your railing and I wondered who did that. I mobbed Instagram until I found it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

But you didn’t post it on your own stuff.

 

Mike Merrill:

I didn’t.

 

Dillon Hales:

You weren’t like, “I just built a new house, check out this awesome rail.” But when you see it on Ryan’s page, because it was Rigby that did your stuff, you’re like, “Hey honey, take a look. This is our house.” You’re showing her, in your house, that’s special to you guys.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

And it’s special to our clients.

 

Mike Merrill:

I take pride in that. Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

We took awesome pictures of Ryan’s projects when we were done and we sent them to him.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s nice. So you share that content with the customer so they can then hopefully share it out, tag you and give you an opportunity to get more people.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yep, exactly. Exactly. That’s how I evolved in taking pictures. I didn’t set out to say we’re going to be a media company or we’re going to do what we’re doing now. It just evolved. The whole end goal was to share more with our customers and to be able to get in front of people with the credibility that I was looking for.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love it. This is modern day marketing, people. Listen up. This is good stuff.

 

Dillon Hales:

One hundred percent.

 

Mike Merrill:

Now you’ve invested in some equipment, probably got some drone stuff, you’ve got somebody full time that spends time capturing content for you. Is that right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. In our notes here, there’s a picture of a pool.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

The Olympic sized pool.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yep.

 

Dillon Hales:

Right? That’s a pretty cool project and I didn’t want to miss it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Because you wanted the footage.

 

Dillon Hales:

I wanted the footage. We floated a barge on an Olympic sized swimming pool.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow.

 

Dillon Hales:

And then they put a lift on it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Because water was still in, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Right.

 

Mike Merrill:

So how do you get above that to weld in a building?

 

Dillon Hales:

The way that the architects have engineered the building, there was no way to get a boom lift in the building. They didn’t put a door big enough, they didn’t put a removable window. There was no way to get a lift in there.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Inevitably it was going to cost more money to blow out a wall just to get a 100-ft boom lift in there, versus just to float a barge on there. But I didn’t want to miss it because that’s a cool shot.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

How often do you do that? So I just tried to get some part-time people to shoot some footage of it and Lad did a great job. But there was times that we were doing cool stuff that Lad wasn’t there and so I need to have my own stuff. I went to the camera store and I got the nice Cannons. I got some more equipment to help us capture it and that’s the behind-the-scenes things that people don’t see as often. We did it for four years off our iPhone.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right. Selfie stuff, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. Selfie stuff. Cameras are great on iPhones. That’s really all the people are looking for too. We have invested a lot and the next chapter of Yeti Welding is going to be a lot more loud. We’re looking to grow a lot more in the next year to two years. I know from our success that whoever has the loudest shtick in marketing, even in the welding word, is going to get the game. I think that goes for any industry.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

I don’t think that everybody needs to have this fancy equipment in their own arsenal, their own tool box. That’s just the way we’re taking it. But I think anybody could use it on an iPhone and get away with it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well how do you start anything? You start.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. You start.

 

Mike Merrill:

Do something, right.

 

Dillon Hales:

One hundred percent.

 

Mike Merrill:

Start with your slipping phone, right? Or not your flipping phone because they don’t have flip phones anymore.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, your touch screen phone.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, that’s great.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, so just start. You just have to start.

 

Mike Merrill:

The thing that I really keep going back to is that phrase. Say it again. So you’re not a welding company, you’re a what?

 

Dillon Hales:

We’re a photography company. We’re not a welding company, we’re a photography company. We’re a media company. We wanted to take pictures of cool stuff. That’s what we wanted to do. Inevitably, that’s what came to us. As we posted that stuff and we said, “Do you guys have a staircase you need? A floating staircase?” That’s what we did. “Hey, do you guys have a really weird project that none of the other people are wanting to do?” That’s what we did.

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

There was little bit of money side to those things because a lot of the companies around here, they didn’t want to do the weird stuff or the wild stuff. People would stay away from it. On the other hand, for us, that’d be a great opportunity to, one, get a great picture. Two, help out our client who can’t find anybody to do it. And three, make a little bit extra money because it’s a project nobody wants. But it all started off with let’s take a cool picture.

 

Mike Merrill:

What is the craziest project you’ve ever done in your mind? Anything come to mind? I know I’m putting you on the spot.

 

Dillon Hales:

We worked on a building on a construction site where we cut apart shipping containers and used them as sides.

 

Mike Merrill:

I heard about that.

 

Dillon Hales:

For around a building in Springville.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yes. Over by the restaurant Strap Tank or next to that, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yep.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

That was probably one of the wildest projects that we worked on.

 

Mike Merrill:

So like the big Conex’s? The huge suckers.

 

Dillon Hales:

The huge Conex’s. The big shipping containers. Our client wanted to make a building look like shipping containers. People were dipping out of it, people were dipping out of it, and honestly I wanted the shot, Mike. I wanted the photo. It was hard work. We burned through a lot of people because they didn’t like doing the work that we were doing.

 

Mike Merrill:

What did you have to do? Tell the listeners about that.

 

Dillon Hales:

They wanted it to look like a shipping container building but the engineering wasn’t allowing them to do it and build the building as big as they wanted without having extra supports everything. He just didn’t think it was economical but he really wanted that look. He wanted the feel of it being shipping containers. Their way of doing it was they would use the big corrugated sides as siding on the building.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow.

 

Dillon Hales:

We cut them apart. We cut the roofs out of them, we cut the floors out of them, and then we used the sides of them essentially as the siding for the building, for its protective coating.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow.

 

Dillon Hales:

I think we cut probably 70 or 80 of them. We lost track after 50 or so.

 

Mike Merrill:

How many blades did you… thousands, maybe? Hundreds? Was it blades or what did you use?

 

Dillon Hales:

We used a lot of variable, different stuff.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

We used 8-in Milwaukee carbide blade saws. Those were really good at cutting certain aspects. Other aspects we used 16-in gas powered Stihl. We had them all. We had Stihls, Husqvarna, we had them all.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

We used diamond blades that cut through pretty much anything because we needed the depths of those to cut the floors in the bottoms.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Then we used torches and plasma cutters and stuff like that. But mainly our 16-in saws and our 8-in saws. I think we had 200 of those diamond blades. They’re $100 a piece.

 

Mike Merrill:

Twenty grand, then.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, twenty grand in just 8-in carbide disks.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow.

 

Dillon Hales:

And then the 16-in blades, we’d go through about one every other week so we used about 20 of those maybe per saw. There was quite a bit. Probably about $40,000 worth of cutting consumables just in blades, aside of gases and stuff. That was probably the wildest project we’ve ever been on.

 

Mike Merrill:

I’ve never heard of anything that wild.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. It lasted a full year. It took us a full year to do the project. It was just really cool, the whole process of it. I’d say that one to date was our wildest project.

Mike Merrill:

And still profitable?

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, it was. It was. It took a lot of my manpower and I got tunnel vision in it. I was just really focused because it was so cool. I was so focused on it that I let others go.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

That probably could’ve been a great opportunity for growth but I was just so tunnel focused on social media and that was bad on my part. It was great. Then 2020 hit and we actually did six times the amount of money and projects than we did in 2019 as we were there for a full year. It was a great paying project, yeah. For sure.

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. It’s long-game, right? Maybe the opportunity cost short term but down the road, you are always going to be the dude that did that building.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. My name’s plastered all over that. We didn’t miss a shot. One regret I have is I wish I could go back in time and say hire this dude, Mark, behind the cameras who I’m pointing to. Hire this dude to capture it all. We’ve captured a lot with our iPhones but we didn’t capture everything.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure. You have to work too.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, we definitely had to work. We definitely had to work but I think the payoff would’ve been much worth it. $20,000 in blades, what would’ve been the payroll cost of somebody to work for three or four months.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

You do the math.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

It was fun.

 

Mike Merrill:

Awesome. With that, how much time do you have to allot for getting the footage, the shots. As far as taking a hit on production, do you know what that number looks like?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. That’s a good point. When I saw that in the notes, I laughed. I was like, “This is funny.”

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re like wait, I don’t know if I want to ask that question.

 

Dillon Hales:

I don’t know if I want to answer it, Mike.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

At first, we would do something and we’re like, “Dude, we should grab a shot of that” and we would undo it and redo it. But that was in the very beginning stages where it was just me and one other guy.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay, okay. That makes more sense.

 

Dillon Hales:

It’s become so normal now that we’re four years into it, that my employees all know, I know, that if something we’re doing they know could be a good shot…

 

Mike Merrill:

They’re telling you in advance?

 

Dillon Hales:

They don’t even tell me now. It’s become a company culture that if somebody pulls out a phone, and they’re not going like this or looking to scope, but if they pull out a phone like this, that just means keep working because they’re going to get a shot. If they stop, then it slows us down. We like to execute projects as fast as possible. We love doing stuff. The faster you get something done, the more money you can make. Your time is money. So when we see a phone come out now, it’s just really normal for us to keep moving on.

 

Mike Merrill:

Just background noise to what you’re doing.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. I’d say in the beginning stages, creating that culture was a little bit strugglesome. I see an employee pull out a phone, I’d be like, “Dude, get off your phone.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

But then later we’d finish a job and I’d be like, “Hey, does anyone have any good shots?” The one employee actually put me on my place and he’s like, “Well, you told me to get off the phone.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

I was like, “Oh, dude. Were you trying to get a shot?” “Yeah, I was trying to get a shot of that crane flying that big box in the air.” “Oh, shit. Dude, sorry.” That’s my bad. That’s a little painful to tell employers you have to give a little more leniency to your employees to use their phones.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

But now, camera comes out, shots. The best practices that we’ve found are shots are taken and then shots are taken to whoever’s posting for the day.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

That person just hurry and add them into an air drop to the phone and we’ll just keep moving on with the project. To answer your question, in the beginning stages it took a lot of time. Now it’s almost seamless and it doesn’t seem like it takes any more time than it regularly does. When that camera comes out, everybody works safer, everybody works smarter because of the backlash that you can get online.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, I’m glad you brought that up.

 

Dillon Hales:

Right? Because the camera will come out and if they’re doing something that could be a violation or even just something that could be made fun of. It’s as simple as your shoe’s untied. I know you got those people online. When a camera comes out, people are working safer and smarter and more effective. It almost makes everybody rethink. Do we have that piece of metal rigged right? I know it can go into the hole once with the crane but are we sure because what if somebody sees it and then makes a stink? Our safety practices almost gone up, especially on that tower project.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I saw that. You guys were strapped in, everybody had harnesses, you were talking on your Instagram live about being safe and making sure… I was really impressed, actually. I thought, wow, these guys have it dialed in.

 

Dillon Hales:

We even swapped out our hard hats. We have those Italian hard hats with the chin straps. Got fun of a couple of times. The first time I had my hard hat on and I looked down, my hard hat was going to fall. We were in a really confined space and I didn’t want anybody to get hurt.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

We had all of our safety stuff. Double yo-yo lanyards, everything 100% tie-off, it was a super safe job. Our GC on the project, he walked in and he’s like, “Man, you guys really go all out.” I’m like, “What do you mean we go all out?”

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s how you roll.

 

Dillon Hales:

He’s like, “I thought maybe you’d have a safety rope or something. You guys got everything.” He’s puling my harness. He’s like, “You guys got everything.” I’m like, “Well yeah. That was included in our bid. To be safe.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

Dillon Hales:

To be the best.

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. I love it. We had a guest, I don’t know if you heard this episode, but Trent Cotney. He’s an attorney out of Florida that specializes in safety and OSHA regulation and defending and helping contractors, training contractors how to be safe, avoid OSHA fines.

Dillon Hales:

Okay.

 

Mike Merrill:

That was one of the things that he talked about, is that companies do have to be careful making sure, again, they’re not documenting something that’s unsafe.

 

Dillon Hales:

Right.

 

Mike Merrill:

Glad to hear you’re aware of that and have gotten ahead of it. Like you said, it actually has made you safer because there’s an awareness that you have to be more careful and cautious because you’re out in front of the world.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, yeah. Speaking from experience, I took a picture on that project. I was standing on a pallet and the pallet was on a forklift. The pallet was maybe two or three feet off the ground but nonetheless the picture portrayed that I was in the air. I wasn’t tied off but two-three feet off the ground was really all the picture was. I don’t know if it was that exact photo or if it was just coincidence because the gal didn’t tell me but later the next day or the same day, within the time I posted, we had an OSHA inspector on the job site. Me being the young, innocent dude that I look, I played the innocent card. I was walking through the parking lot and I saw her sitting there watching me guys and I was like, “She’s going to grab a picture,” you know and I saw the state seal.

 

Dillon Hales:

I just poked little questions and texted all my dudes and said make sure you’re all safe. That’s when it really hit me. You can definitely get in trouble for it. But at the same time, what’s the risk for reward. The risk is you’re going to get a fine or a penalty for doing something wrong but the risk of losing the shop, to me, is worth more. As long as everybody’s being safe, it doesn’t matter if it’s a photo or not. They can come and talk to me. As long as our photos are safe. It’s just evolved that everybody works safe now. Just like that tower you said. You could see. You joined our lives.

 

Mike Merrill:

It was obvious, yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

It was obvious that we were 100% compliant with whatever we could-

 

Mike Merrill:

And you don’t know who’s joining. Anyone can join. You’re live to the public.

 

Dillon Hales:

We had 1200 people join that live.

 

Mike Merrill:

It was crazy.

 

Dillon Hales:

In and out. Again, it almost made us more safe because we’re not afraid to document what we’re doing because we are being as compliant as possible. If we’re not compliant, I’d hope that somebody would come and tell me as an employer. In my shop, if you use a grinder without a guard, you’re done. You’re out. You get two warnings and that’s it. In most welding shops, you don’t see guards on grinders. We get made fun of. We post a picture of the guard on our grinder, “What you got that guard on there for?”

 

Mike Merrill:

Sissy guard. Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’ll fly to Alabama and show you how to use a grinder with a guard on it. If there’s any position you can’t do with a guard on it then… I haven’t listened to that podcast but some people might be afraid of that but my advice to those listeners is just trust in your employees a little bit more and make sure that company culture’s simply safe.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love that. I think the most refreshing thing… I like social media. We have accounts here. We try and post and share content as well like a lot of companies. It’s just so refreshing to see, not only the cool jobs you’re doing, but I can see, I can feel as a third party, you guys are having a great time. You’re enjoying your job, you’re enjoying your life, you’re enjoying this journey that you’re on. I think it’s just really cool that you’re doing it and you’re sharing it with the world and being an example to others.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, thanks. I appreciate it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Do you mentor others? Do you have people that check in with you or ask your questions or try and get ideas?

 

Dillon Hales:

As far as for media?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah, like other companies. Maybe other subs that are on the project. Do you have companies that reach out to you for those types of feedback items?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yes. I don’t feel like I’m pioneering it away but when we’re on a job site and there’s electricians and plumbers and stuff but we want to do a video, we quickly ask everybody. We’re like, “Hey, are you guys good? We’re going to take a quick photo. Are you guys okay?” I’ve been surprised that some people run out of the photo or whatever. There are those people that’ve come up to us and say, “How come you’re doing this? What are you doing?” Then we’re like, “Don’t you follow us on Instagram?”

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’ve used that line all the time.

 

Mike Merrill:

Cool.

 

Dillon Hales:

Don’t you follow us on Instagram? I don’t give business cards out to people because I just see them get thrown away.

 

Mike Merrill:

Intentionally.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. It goes back to my original days. I bought Vistaprint, I got my thousand business cards, I was handing out to all general contractors. And then just out the door, in the garbage.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

But when I go there and they’re like, “Send me your contact info.” I’ll be like, “Do you got Instagram?” “No.” “Do you got Facebook? You got TikTok?” They’re going to have one of them.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

They’re going to have one of them.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right.

 

Dillon Hales:

I use that all the time. You can just hit the contacts link and all my stuff’s there. Make sure you follow us to keep up on cool projects.

 

Mike Merrill:

Nice.

 

Dillon Hales:

They’ll say they didn’t follow me. They’ll say they didn’t check our stuff out but being a business account you can see the analytics.

 

Mike Merrill:

You can see it, yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

I can see that John just watched my Instagram stories and he went through and liked a couple photos from a year ago so they were mobbing the account.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’ve got what, close to 15,000 now on Instagram?

 

Dillon Hales:

I think we’re 15,000 or 16,000 followers.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great.

 

Dillon Hales:

That number doesn’t matter and it shouldn’t matter for any company.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. Why not?

 

Dillon Hales:

Because in my view, this is my personal view, I would rather have five people follow me through the fire versus 10,000 people watch me burn.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Even if you’ve got a small following, your company is trying to start media and you’re like, “But we don’t have this many numbers” or whatever. If you have 100 people following you and you have really good people who are following you-

 

Mike Merrill:

They’re plugged in you’re saying…

 

Dillon Hales:

That’s what should be more important.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. How engaged are they.

 

Dillon Hales:

How engaged are they. Because inevitably at the end of the day it’s not about your main number because analytics of all these social medias are all running completely wild and different now. Not all 15,000 followers of ours get to see our stuff on a daily basis or a weekly basis or whatever. It’s just about how many people are actually genuine on there. I think we have about 15%. I think that’s our rates right now.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s a good number.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Anything over 10 is a pretty solid number.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, so we’re like 15% right now. Because you can see over my Instagram as you said, you can see how we started and evolved up and I do talk a lot about my humble beginnings and how I started, I do have a lot of people ask me, “How should I go about getting work.” The first thing I say is, “You need to start building yourself a portfolio online to give yourself that credibility.” I do help people, influence them a little bit in that way, to answer your question in that regard. They reach out and say how could I do this or what should I do that. I reach out to as many people in Utah County that are doing welding and try to be in their shop and say this is what we’re doing, this is what we’re seeing that’s worked.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. So you’re doing it even with competitors?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. That’s another rabbit hole we could go down. I had a competitor that we were like this. I’d show up and he’d give a bid. I’d show up and they’re like so-and-so just came here and I’d be like, “I’ll do it for half.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Oh, boy.

 

Dillon Hales:

There was big animosity between us and one day I was like you know what? They’ve blocked us on Instagram and I have to follow my personal account to see what they’re doing. I’m done. There’s so much work in the construction trade, everyone should be working together.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

Because everybody’s numbers are different but they’re all the same at the same time. It doesn’t matter about who gets the project or doesn’t. Like I mentioned earlier in the podcast, who did your rail? I’m logged in Instagram looking for your rail. Why didn’t I get Mike’s rail? Why did I only have to do Matt and Ryan’s?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

But I started reaching out to those other people and showing up in their shops and tagging them in our photos and calling them out. We built a really great community of welders around here that we all jab and have fun on Instagram together. We also share a lot of projects.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s what I was going to say next. You probably need some help from those guys on occasion. They got more guys, right? You got a big project, might need some help.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. A lot of the guys around here, they know that I don’t like to do rail anymore. We do it for certain contractors but in the same regards, those companies love to do rail. So when we come across a rail project that we’re like, “We can do this for you but this is our timeframe because of our bigger projects, but we know a guy that’s amazing” and then we send them that way. They get a weird project and they’re like, “Whoa. We have to give those to the Yeti guys.” Follow the Yeti guys. We built a really great community just simply because we’ve been able to reach out and talk amongst ourselves. Literally it all became because of Instagram. I don’t think I would’ve just randomly walked into some guys shop and been like, “Is Dillon around here?”

 

Mike Merrill:

Right. Love it. I did notice you don’t really have a website or anything either, do you? Not really anything that you keep up to date.

 

Dillon Hales:

No.

 

Mike Merrill:

No online presence other than social?

 

Dillon Hales:

When will this podcast air?

 

Mike Merrill:

Probably the next few weeks.

 

Dillon Hales:

Next few weeks so it won’t be right away?

 

Mike Merrill:

Not right away.

 

Dillon Hales:

We did have a website. I took it down. We were actually going to become an apparel company.

 

Mike Merrill:

Like welding apparel? Safety stuff?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. Safety stuff. Then money got the best of me. Had some cool projects come up. That website’s turned on and turned off. Right now it’s currently down and we’re in the construction mode. We’re going to roll out something pretty cool now that we have a team for media. We’re going to roll a sweepstakes. We’re going to give away one of my dearest welders.

 

Mike Merrill:

Oh, wow. Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

As long as it’s going to air in a couple of weeks-

 

Mike Merrill:

Does it come with free training to use the welder?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, yeah. I’ll come out and show you how. I’ll come out and show you how to use it if you win it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Fire it up.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, fire it up. Run some beads.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

I wasn’t planning on being a welder my whole life.

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

This little welding, it just evolved, and I didn’t really think that we needed a website because we have Instagram. We have our contact info there on social media. We have our Facebook with all of our info there. If you google our name, our Facebook and Instagram comes up. So why do we need to pay to have someone build us a website and maintain it and then hope it’s going to work. Tech’s changing so fast and what’s the fastest way to keep up with tech? Have somebody else keep up with tech for you. These free social media platforms, they’re keeping up. Instagram changed and they’re like do you want to change your bios, we’re allowing more characters and we’re allowing shop links and this and that. So it just evolved. We’ve never really ran out of work hard enough for me to be like, “Okay it’s time to build this kind of a website.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Interesting.

 

Dillon Hales:

Because our credibility is already built there. You don’t need to go to a website and look about us. Go to the bottom of the page on social media and learn who the founders are. My face is all over there on social media. My face is everywhere on social media and my guys’ faces are all over there on social media. So we don’t have a website currently and we do have a website that’ll be rolling out just simply to share with all of our followers and the people who support us. They all love our hats, they love our logo, so they just want some of their own.

 

Mike Merrill:

They want a piece of the action.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, they want a piece of the action. Hey, where’s my hat. The tradesman, you know that. The lumber guy comes around, he’s handing out free hats. That free hat means more than a paycheck to you.

 

Mike Merrill:

Sure.

 

Dillon Hales:

You’re a contractor, you’re building that whole house, and that dude gives you a hat and you’re like, “Dang.” You don’t care about the $100,000 you just made on the house.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right. You’re excited about the hat.

 

Dillon Hales:

“Hey honey, guess what. Mike just gave me some new hats. I’m going to rep them everywhere.” That’s kind of what we’re doing with the website now. It’s just so people can have a little bit of apparel and support us that way.

 

Mike Merrill:

Cool. Now that you’ve gotten some notoriety, you’re out there, people are recognizing you, know your name, I imagine you’ve probably had some opportunities to represent products? I noticed Keen Boots seem to be you’re tagging all the time or shouting out. Are there some products that you represent or that you’re sponsored by that hook you up from time to time?

 

Dillon Hales:

Honestly, that’s a great question. I truly believe in the products that we use. I love them. If I love them, I’ll let you know. If I don’t love them, I will let you know. I will let you know.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

We did have a shoe company that reached out to us in the early stages. I think we had 5,000 or 10,000 followers. They’re like, “We’ll give you some free boots.” I wore them but there was a contract. The contract was you got to wear these boots and we’ll pay you this much but we need you to post this many times or whatever. I did that but the boots were garbage.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay, cool.

 

Dillon Hales:

Now all my guys wear these Keens. We don’t have any sort of affiliation with Keen.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

Other than these boots have just performed and we love them. I hope that they give us credibility… If Keen ever needs us to weld something, I hope they’re like, “We’re going to call the Yeti guys because we know they do good work.” So we’re not sponsored by Keen in any way. We just really love their boots. We love the protection. But we have done other promotional projects where people have reached out. In the emails and the pre-emails, I’ll tell them the same thing I just mentioned to you. If I like it, I’m going to tell you. If I don’t like it, I’m going to tell you and I’m going to tell my followers too.

 

Mike Merrill:

Straight shooter.

 

Dillon Hales:

Straight shooter. And if you don’t want me to be honest, you want me to do a script-

 

Mike Merrill:

I’m not your guy.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’m not your guy. I learned this thing a long time ago from one of my favorite contractors. He said you hire and you fire your own clients. Your clients don’t hire you. You hire your own clients. Same thing with the apparel. That stuck with me early on, especially right after I wore those boots because I did wear them in you know? and see actually where they worked. They were garbage. My feet hurt so bad.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Dillon Hales:

I just let people know beforehand and I do try them out and if I like them, we’ll do them. We have done a handful of other products and stuff like that that were paid promotion but after they passed the test, after I liked them I’m like, “I got them. This is what we’re going to do for you.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. Well, I love your coolers.

 

Dillon Hales:

No, those are not our coolers.

 

Mike Merrill:

I’m just kidding.

 

Dillon Hales:

I wish.

 

Mike Merrill:

I know. They’re expensive right.

 

Dillon Hales:

I wish I owned a company like that, man.

 

Mike Merrill:

You’re like, “I wish I owned a Yeti cooler.”

 

Dillon Hales:

I wish I owned a Yeti bike. The bike.

 

Mike Merrill:

Oh, yeah. They got all kinds of stuff.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’ve been riding a Yeti bike for a little while. I’ve always wanted a Yeti bike. My friends always had them but I’ve never had the money. I’m just an scrubby welder, dude.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s it. Love it.

 

Dillon Hales:

I’m just broke. A broke welder.

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. Such a cool story, very fascinating. I think people really love this and it’ll resonate with a lot of folks. More on a personal level, I just have a few questions I want to wrap up with. What’s one thing that you’re grateful for, just in your personal life?

 

Dillon Hales:

My personal life?

 

Mike Merrill:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Dillon Hales:

Probably be my wife.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

My wife and my kids.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay.

 

Dillon Hales:

I come home all the time and I’m like, “I’m done. I’m quitting. I’m done welding.” The world out there is hard. But Sarah, she always reaffirms me. She’s there for me.

 

Mike Merrill:

Cool.

 

Dillon Hales:

She appreciates what I do outside and that’s probably one of the most grateful things, my wife and her support in being an entrepreneur. That’d probably be my…

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great. Yeah, it’s not easy, right. She’s signed up just like you are.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, especially when you want to do your own thing as a boss, it’s a whole family deal. It’s a really lonely road that you walk but it’s also everybody’s signed up. Sarah calls and texts and says, “Hey, when are you coming home?” And I’m like, “I’m on my way. I’m just in a longer meeting.” It’s not a set schedule. I’m super grateful for Sarah and sticking with me. Allowing me to drop out of school and be one of those rogue dudes. I’m done with college, going to be a tradesman. Which isn’t a bad thing.

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. Yeah, I agree with that. I love it. Blue collar is not a bad option.

 

Dillon Hales:

No. Actually I had a client the other day told me I was charging more than doctors and lawyers. I said I might not have gone to school but I know how to fuse atoms together and you don’t.

 

Mike Merrill:

Right? That’s it. Yeah, value of what you’ve got to offer. Good for you. What about a personal skill or Dillon’s super power. What would that be if there’s something about you that’s just your wheelhouse. What is that?

 

Dillon Hales:

My super power?

 

Mike Merrill:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Dillon Hales:

I think my super power is when I put my mind to a timeframe or something that we need to do, I get it done in that timeframe. My guys know that too. I’ll give them a deadline and be like, “Hey, we told these guys it’d be done then.” They’ll be like, “There’s no way.” It took a long time for my two hands to know that but I think that’s my super power. When I set my timeframe on something and we say we can accomplish it at that, we figure out a way. You make time for things that are important to you and if completing the task is important to you, you’re going to figure it out quick. I think that’s my super power is figuring it out in that timely matter.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love it. Yeah, that’ll continue to bless your business if you’re practicing that now.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, we try. I definitely try.

 

Mike Merrill:

Good for you. What about something you learned more recently that you wish you would’ve known six years ago or so when you started? Is there something that you’re like, “Man, I got a lot of bruises on this thing. I wish I would’ve had this figured out…”

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. That I don’t know everything and my employees know just as much. That I can trust my employees. I wish I could’ve done that… I can weld but so can a lot of other people and I wish I could’ve trusted them to say you guys can do this or you can do these welds too just as good as I can. I wish I would’ve known that four years ago when I hired my first employee. I wish I could’ve instilled and let them know how much I trusted them. It’s one thing just giving an employee a job and saying go ahead and do this, but it’s another to give them affirmation like I trust you to do this and I know you’re going to do a great job. Giving them that affirmation, I’ve seen way more success in letting people run with that versus just here’s your job.

 

Mike Merrill:

Lets them grow, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, lets them grow and lets them think this guy trusts me with this and I’ve got to do a good job. I don’t jut have to do it and then clock out at five o’clock. I wish I would’ve known that a longer time ago. Doing everything yourself for your whole life on the farm and growing up, “I’ll just do it. That’s kind of a hard weld so I’ll just do it.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Pretty soon you’re doing them all, right?

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, yeah. And I can’t do them all. We’re getting too big. I simply can’t do it all.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I heard a quote the other day. I’ll probably butcher it but it was something like true leadership is not being the only person with the good ideas, it’s creating an environment where your teammates and other people, people that report to you, can have their good ideas come to life.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

And then you can implement those.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, I like that. I like that.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love it. What about a challenge or something that you really had to overcome and work through in business. What was something that was hard and what have you learned from that?

 

Dillon Hales:

Learning to say no. Learning to say no. I have a very wide variety of skills. I can do a lot of stuff. Whenever somebody would say, “Can you do this?” It was always, “Yes.” Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. But that’s been a big challenge and I think it probably took me up until last year to finally start saying no to certain projects and to certain stuff. It was always can you do this? Even if it’s like you’re a welding shop, “Can you make this wood table?” “Yes, we can. Of course.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Right, right. And hang those doors surely, no problem.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, I can do that. I can change a pipe. But that’s probably one of the hardest lessons I’ve had to learn is just to say no. Knowing what avenue you should stay in and report to.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love that. To wrap up, last question. What would you hope the listeners walk away with after hearing our conversation today? If there’s one thing.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. If there’s one thing, you mentioned it. Just start. Just start. Don’t feel like you have to have a huge following to do any sort of on social media. And you can only capture it once. Like I said in the beginning, we would do projects then we would undo, we would put a piece of stair strainer in and we would undo it just to take the shot. It’s easier to start now, take the shot even if you don’t use it right away, you have the shot and you can use that later. So I hope that the listeners learning about what I’ve done for media and how I’ve grown with our media and what we’ve done, I hope that they just realize that they can start it. They don’t need anything fancy. They just need to make sure that they’re employees know that it’s okay to take a picture of something and to send it to somebody who’s simply managing it. Let them take off with it because it’s not about what you do right now, it’s about who has the loudest voice.

 

Mike Merrill:

Love that. Awesome. Well, I hope you all learned how you can have a louder voice and swing a bigger stick.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

Dillon Hales’s a great example of that and he is definitely out there proving it every day. You can follow along and watch.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah. Follow us on Instagram @YetiWelding. It’ll come up.

 

Mike Merrill:

We’ll link everything up in the show notes and make sure that we tag all of your socials and your content and share that with our listeners as well.

 

Dillon Hales:

Yeah, for sure. I appreciate you letting us come stop by.

 

Mike Merrill:

You bet. Thank you to the listeners for joining us today on the Mobile Workforce Podcast, sponsored by About Time Technologies and WORKMAX. If you enjoyed the conversation that Dillon and I had today, please give us a five star rating and review and follow us on all the socials, LinkedIn, on Instagram @WORKMAX_ and please again share this with those of your friends and other colleagues that you have that might be interested in learning from this discussion. Thank you all again. After all, our goal is to help you not only improve in business but in life.