Innovation in Construction: Using Tech to Tackle Its Bad Rep

There are a lot of stereotypes about the construction business, such as all projects go over budget and delays are inevitable. Most of them are dated and untrue, but these misconceptions still weigh the industry down. How? For starters, by making it harder to attract good workers and increasing skepticism by prospective customers. The good news is there’s never been a better time to work in construction, with technology at the helm of significant changes that improve how companies budget, report progress, and track issues. Fortunately, technology and marketing are the answer to freeing the industry from outdated stereotypes once and for all.

In this special crossover episode with the Bridging the Gap Podcast, host Todd Weyandt breaks down common stereotypes about the construction industry and shares ways to reshape construction’s image in 2021 and beyond.

 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Contractors should partner with their local trade organizations on community initiatives. The industry will be able to change the general public’s perception if everyone works together for the greater good. By working together on projects that give back to the community and unify to recruit for job fairs, contractors will begin to be trusted and respected by the community and each other. Trust and respect for the construction industry and the different trades benefits the entire industry. 
  2. Promote soft skills on the job site. Construction is not a muscle-only industry. The need for soft skills and tech savvy is only increasing. On-the-job training and fast tracks for promotion give anyone willing to do the work the opportunity to succeed. As an industry, we need to show that making a career in construction is rewarding, does not require extensive college debt to get into, and has unlimited upward mobility. 
  3. Sales and marketing are a huge part of the process today. Studies show that 85% of all purchasing decisions are researched beforehand online. If you do not have an online presence with a website and social media, especially LinkedIn, you are missing the opportunity to set the expectation for new clients. But having a website and social pages isn’t enough. Show off your diverse team, the technology you use and the quality of the jobs you have already completed. 

Make sure to check out the second half of our conversation on the Bridging the Gap Podcast! We discuss actionable steps to build a new reputation for your business by promoting the processes and technology you use on the job site and online. 

 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrell:

Hello and welcome to the Mobile Workforce Podcast. I am your host Mike Merrell and today we are recording part one of a specials crossover series with a host of the award-winning podcast Bridging the Gap Todd Weyandt. Thank you Todd for joining us. I’m excited to sit down with you and have this discussion today.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Absolutely. Thanks for having me on.

 

Mike Merrell:

You bet. So before we get into the conversation too deep, would you give our listeners just a little bit of an overview in your background and experience?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, absolutely. So my official title is Director of Creative Marketing at Applied Software and we are AEC and manufacturing systems integrators, so we tackle pretty much anything under the sun with AEC, whether it’s software or custom development or workflow enhancements, we probably have it covered there. And then through that, I get to host the Bridging the Gap podcast which focuses in on the innovation and the innovators out in construction and MEP. So we focus a lot on kind of what are those foundational elements to make technology adoption successful whether that’s on the culture side of things or business process side or the innovation and growth mindset that is needed to not only just survive the future of construction and the changes happening, but really thrive in that new year.

 

Mike Merrell:

Oh, that’s awesome. Yep. I applaud your efforts and enjoyed listening to your podcast episodes so far and love what you’re doing for the industry. It’s a great resource that can be really helpful to our brothers out in the field.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Thanks.

 

Mike Merrell:

You bet. So I guess kind of to get things started off, I just thought maybe we could talk about one of those quote unquote elephants in the room that sometimes happens in conversation about construction people and workers, just the stereotype that it’s grunt work and people that are less skilled in other areas end up working construction because that’s all they’re really good at. What are your thoughts on that?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, I mean it’s for sure a prevalent stereotype and I, true confessions, I have fallen guilty of that in the past myself, that it’s maybe just a job, it’s not a real career path. Some of the other stereotypes of it’s a dirty job or slow to change, stuck in the past, no tech. What I have learned though, I’ve been at Applied Software for almost seven years and doing the podcast for about a year and a half, and what I’ve learned over that time is that’s just so not true. There are so many cool new technologies coming into the construction space and there are so many people that have their arms wide open for embracing that technology, they’re just not good at sharing what they’re doing and talking about it. And that probably stems from a whole bunch of reasons. Chief among them is that the construction industry is full of a bunch of really humble people, which is great, and their head down, get the job done. That’s all they’re focused on, which is definitely, I’m not knocking that. That has its place and its advantages for sure, but they’re not great at sharing their stories.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. I think I would agree with that completely. I mean I grew up in construction company industry and, did some pretty cool projects, but when I go out and about and travel throughout the country and even the world sometimes internationally, I am just amazed at some of the structures that I see and some of the architecture that’s happening in this day and age. And I really tip my hat to the trades that are able to create these beautiful structures and incredibly, just almost inspiring buildings that are also structurally sound and built with quality.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Oh for sure. Yeah. I mean some of those are pretty just mind blowing, especially when you add in how modulars coming into the industry and that the offsite bringing in manufacturing principles. I mean there’s some just really cool mindblowing stuff out there.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. You mentioned a minute ago just kind of the stereotype that construction doesn’t necessarily adopt technology. What are some examples of some things that amaze you from the guests you’ve had?

 

Todd Weyandt:

On the technology side of things?

 

Mike Merrell:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

 

Todd Weyandt:

Well I think what I just mentioned there with modular construction coming in and the industrialized construction that’s starting to overtake the industry, I think that there’s just really cool processes that they are able to get a lot more efficient, move projects a lot faster, and then really increase safety just by shifting into a different workflow with offsite and kind of pulling in those manufacturing principles and turning a construction site into a factory for all intensive purposes. Yeah. I think that’s some really cool things going on there that, it’s not a majority of jobs doing that right now, but I think that it’s going to be growing in popularity for sure.

I think another big thing is the construction industry proved over the last year especially that they can adopt technology at a rapid clip when they have to and start to put in place all those digital workflows, whether it’s as simple as getting on a Microsoft Teams application or something and having that chat functionality and collaboration within that platform. I think the construction industry has really proven that they had the chops to adopt the technology. It’s not as foreign as some might have you believe.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. And these younger generations that are coming into the trades and advancing in management roles as some of the baby boomers retire, we’re seeing waves of new technologies being adopted in all types of industries and companies that I’m seeing.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Oh for sure. Well they’re demanding it. The younger generations, it’s not a nice to have, it’s an expectation here. The company would be very strange and weird if they didn’t have the technology for millennials and gen Z as they’re coming into the industry now as well.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah, I like that. And you mentioned something a minute ago about safety and I think that’s another area that I’m very, again coming from the trades, I’m just very impressed with not only how incredible these structures are becoming and the methodologies that companies are building these buildings and that the engineers are putting them together, but these things are being done very safely at record rates and safety percentages that we haven’t seen in the past. So amazing.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, for sure. Especially all the COVID curveballs that have been thrown the way of the construction, for them to keep the jobs going this last year I think really speaks volumes to the grit and determination of the industry, but also the can do, get her done mentality of the industry.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. I think, like you mentioned a minute ago, that just generally the attitude and even the humility, the quietly just get to work, get their elbows dirty and just dig in and figure it out. I mean that’s definitely something that construction companies are good at doing.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Oh for sure.

 

Mike Merrell:

So what about when you hear things like when people talk about oh the projects are always late, they’re always over budget, you can’t trust a contractor as far as you can throw them. I mean what do you say to those types of stereotypes that also get thrown around on occasion? Or maybe shown on a TV show or something?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. I think that there’s such a broken cultural and communication aspect in the construction industry right now. One of the things that we talk about on Bridging the Gap is how to embrace those soft skills and what does that really mean. And I think, going back to the generational aspect of it, this is not a knock on older generations by any stretch, but millennials and the gen Zs are coming in expecting a little softer edge than what the industry has typically been accustomed to, which I don’t necessarily think is a bad thing. If you take it to any extreme it’s not great, but…

Now I’m not saying everybody sits around all day and just sings Kumbaya by any stretch, but I think focusing in on the trust factor and having that as an undercurrent between those different teams is a really big opportunity for the construction industry because there is bad blood, whether you’re talking about between the architect and the GC to the subs to the owner, there’s so much people talking past each other and not really sitting down and saying, alright, where are you coming from, what are you trying to get out of this project. I don’t necessarily have to agree with where you’re coming or your process, but I have to know where you are at so that then I know what I need to bring to the table and how to communicate back with you. There’s so much of the industry of it’s just easier to push it down to somebody else, blame somebody else and really contracts are set up that way as well, too. You look at contracts and it’s if something is going to fail, it’s when it fails this is what happens.

And so that is just an environment that sets it up for that mistrust and all of that has a huge impact on delaying projects and slowing projects down because everybody’s now in this super cautious cover yourself mode instead of offering and really embracing that true collaboration. So I know that’s a big buzz word that means a lot of different things to a lot of different people, but that’s because people have that mistrust and aren’t really taking the time to sit down and hear the other person’s point of view.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. You mentioned a lot of really powerful things there. And I recently just came from an AGC event, Associated General Contractors, for the state of Utah and it was their 99th annual conference. So really cool, big year, a hundred years next year. And it was an in-person event so with everything going on that was a lot of fun. And we spent a couple of days up there with a lot of our team members. And one of the things that was so inspiring, in our local chapter there’s a building, I think it was between $7 and $8 million cost for an AGC training center, and the vast majority of the labor, the materials, and the money to build that facility were donated by the contractors in the state of Utah.

And so there were a lot of what I call frenemies or competitive companies working side by side in tandem donating time, labor, money, resources for the greater good. And it’s all in the name of safety. It’s a safety training center for members of the AGC. So it was so inspiring and I was truly proud to be a member of AGC and to be a technology partner for companies that are members and just to see that incredible brotherhood that existed in that environment. I think that’s kind of what you’re talking about. We need to broadly do a better job of those types of things working together for the greater good.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Oh for sure. Yeah. I’m a big proponent of just having those conversations and humanizing the other person. I think that goes a long way. And that can sound super corny, but it’s effective.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. Yeah. And then one of the things too that was a big push, they have a hashtag, we build Utah was the hashtag. They had a really inspiring video clip of probably a dozen of these construction projects, highways, bridges, buildings of all the different contractors and little outsert quotes from different team members that were out there working in the trenches. And it was just incredible to realize the impact that the construction industry has on society in general. And I think sometimes we in construction even take that for granted and need to be reminded of this new term of being an essential worker. We’re all essential for sure. We all equal our part of society, but construction is just a critical component, especially the services trades and people that keep things going. And so it’s inspiring to be a part of it and we need to do a better job of reminding ourselves and others of that at times I think.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. More than agree with that.

 

Mike Merrell:

So tell me, within the industry, do you think sometimes we’re our own enemy a little bit or kind of need to be better proponents of this as we have dialogue within our organizations?

 

Todd Weyandt:

I think within the industry we are most definitely our own worst enemies there. And really the blame starts and pretty much ends within the construction industry on this marketing problem. Because if you’re not telling your story, who is? And you’re leaving that up to somebody else that does not know what is really going on. And that’s just silly.

 

Mike Merrell:

Almost like the TV sitcom persona of a construction worker?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. And they have no idea what actually goes on in construction. Most people within the industry doesn’t really fully understand the scope of what all is going on. Like what you were saying there about construction and the essential worker, maybe it stems back to that humility again, that construction is so just head down, let’s get this project where we’re all in on the specs and the criteria for this one thing that it’s hard to stop and kind of lift your head up and see that bigger picture of the impact that construction really has on society at large. With the, I’m going to get these stats wrong, but with the population booming as what it is worldwide, it’s something by like 2050 there’s going to be like a couple of hundred more New Yorks in scale and size that are being built within the world. That’s insane. And that doesn’t get done without construction. So I think being able to see that bigger picture in mind is huge for the construction industry and it’s something that, as a whole, we’re not very good at.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah, we’re building the homes that Google’s employees live in. We’re building buildings that Google operates or Facebook or Microsoft or Apple. We have a customer that has worked on all of those large projects in the electrical trades and it’s amazing how busy they stay in expansion of some of the world’s largest and most successful businesses that depend on them in construction to allow them to grow their business and advanced technology that we’re all enjoying today. Even that we’re recording this episode with.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean who would have thought that data centers would be the end all be all this past year, but that became an essential building because with everybody going digital and remote, it’s all about the data center now instead of office buildings.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. And all the buzz with green energy and solar. We have lots of customers that do solar or cellular towers or all these other things that we’re using to power our homes and our offices, our communication systems. I mean just, there’s no end to construction’s impact on every facet of our lives.

 

Todd Weyandt:

For sure.

 

Mike Merrell:

So with what’s been going on in 2020, do you think the notion has been shattered of technology isn’t really needed on the job sites or maybe some of the old school mentality that maybe existed a decade or so ago?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Man, I’d like to hope so. But I’m really curious about it because I think in large part, yes, it has. But I’m curious if when things fully open back up, do you start to see a slow creep back to that mentality and, oh, well that was good as a band-aid for what we needed during that time, but now we can get back to the way it used to be. I think that the longer everything is happening, that probably diminishes and people get used to it. And once you’ve had that taste of tech and efficiency and you’ve learned that it’s not super scary, I would think that that’s a hard thing to give back up. But I think it’s a really intriguing open question for sure.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. I know we had another episode, in fact one of our first episodes of, the very first guests that we had on our show was Brian Kaskavalciyan from a company called gFour marketing and he was sharing a sentiment that I’ve said for a long time too that we are not contractors, we are businessmen and women in the construction business essentially. And one of the most important things that can happen to advance that business is marketing our ourselves properly and appropriately. And that’s definitely one of the big gaps that I see even still in construction companies.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, absolutely. And admittedly I’m very biased in the role of marketing has that it can play, but in my mind it really goes back to what I was saying about if you’re not telling your story then you’re leaving it up to somebody else. And at the end of the day, marketing is all about storytelling. People are visual. They want videos, they want pictures, they want to be able to relate to the human success stories that are in the industry.

And in my mind, at the end of the day construction is a people-driven industry and we just have to do a better job communicating what does that really mean, what’s the impact of that? You hear all these stories of the guy going into the trades, not going to college, he’s not getting $100,000 in debt and he buys his first house by the time he’s 24, 25 and he’s doing awesome and making a killing compared to the college grad that comes out a $100,000 in debt and gets a remedial entry-level job right out of school and it takes him years to catch up to where the guy who started in the trades is. So I think being able to tell that in a more compelling way is crucial to the industry moving forward. And really with the skilled labor shortage and all that stuff, I think this is a key component to that.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. There’s some very, very well paid employees in the construction industry in this day and age. No question about it. I think that’s a fallacy that a lot of people maybe don’t understand. What do you think about the younger generation coming through college and maybe coming out of high school now. What can we do to do a better job of recruiting and getting some of them involved?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. Great question. So I think being able, going back to those stories, I think that that’s huge. Find the people that have done it and help make them the spokesperson for it. Because it’s one thing to say that it’s possible, it’s another thing to show somebody that it was possible with, this is maybe controversial. I’m a Tom Brady fan. So if you would tell somebody that it’s possible to win seven Super Bowl titles and go to the Super Bowl 10 times in your career, you probably wouldn’t really believe that that’s true until you hold up Tom Brady and say, this dude’s done it. It is possible. That’s way more impactful than just necessarily saying the stats of what could be. So I think finding the poster boy, poster girls for lack of a better phrase is crucial. It humanizes that story.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. And if you pick Tom Brady out of a line of football players, he’s probably not the first or even the 10th through the 20th guy you’re going to pick by stature or his chiseled physique, yet any team in the NFL would absolutely love to have him, right?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, absolutely.

 

Mike Merrell:

No. So there are, again, so we’ve talked about some of these things. There are a lot of things to be excited about that are happening in the construction world and in the industry. What are some things that you wish people were more aware of? Or if you could shine a light on something, what would some of those highlights be?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, great question. I think what excites me about the construction industry right now specifically is it’s at the start of its own industrial revolution for sure, which is really exciting. It’s already starting to take place and we’ve seen that, but there’s still a whole lot more of that curve left to go. And I think the technology leaders over the next decade, meaning what you have thought in the past of as the technology leader of the Apples or the Googles of the world, I think over the next decade or two you’re going to see construction being thrown in the mix. There’s going to be a construction company that rises up and kind of takes that mantle from one of those companies. And in my mind, construction is really the tip of the spear with all the innovation coming, all the tech that’s happening and that growth mindset and the hunger for getting better, getting more efficient, getting faster, getting safer. All of that is just an incredible soup that is being mixed in, is boiling up, and it’s just going to explode here in a little bit, which is, the potential there is what I people would latch onto more, that it’s an exciting time to be in construction.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. Do you think social media has a big role to play in raising that awareness?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Absolutely. Yeah. I think. So LinkedIn is my drug of choice. I like to tease. Yeah. I think LinkedIn is huge because back to the story element and kind of raising up those poster childs of it’s possible, I mean that’s where people are going to find those stories right now, is on social media. So whether it is LinkedIn or Instagram or Facebook, whatever, telling those stories and relating to the personal aspect of it, that’s huge. And that happens on social now. Love it or hate it.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. We have a local, it’s a welder actually, that did some work for my partner that’s our CEO called Yeti Welding here in Utah and he invested a while back in a drone and posts stuff every day and it’s fresh and it’s fun and it’s him rising his guys or him doing aerial shots of a really cool project they just did or some huge plasma cutting table just doing something intricate. And it’s very fascinating and entertaining. And they’ve, I don’t know how they have 14, 15,000 followers at this point and it’s just a small welding shop. They do some incredible work, but if you look at just even their Instagram page, it’s very impressive and you wouldn’t think they’re small at all by the projects that they’re doing. And so that’s an example to me of where he’s doing a fantastic job of marketing a great product that’s still maybe a little bit of a secret just because of their size and scope currently.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. And the great thing about social media is it allows you, what may have been a regional player can now spread their message anywhere. There’s no limits. And that I think is a really cool, exciting thing. Opens up a lot more competition, but it also opens you up to a whole lot more customers and clients as well.

 

Mike Merrell:

Well everybody says they have the best quality or they have some tagline that’s the same as a thousand other business cards say, but it is another opportunity to differentiate yourself. And if you believe in what you’re doing and you’re passionate about it, I think that shines through and that will resonate with them more than just another marketing slogan.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. I totally agree. And then you get to compete against the best and that’s something in and of itself there.

 

Mike Merrell:

There you go. Yeah. We actually have him scheduled to be on the podcast here in the next couple of weeks. So pretty excited for him to tell that story and share his vision of what they’re trying to accomplish and how it’s helped them win more jobs.

So we’ve talked about social media, LinkedIn, different mediums that companies can utilize as tools. I mean it used to be just, oh, we’ve got a website and you immediately were in the upper echelon of a construction company. And so I think we’re well past that, but are there some other things, I mean commercials, radio stuff. I mean, what other kinds of things do you see companies doing that you think are helpful?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. I’m a big proponent of videos. Whether you can release them on the website, you can do in email campaigns or social or a ton of variety and people are growing more and more and more to be visual creatures. And we always have been, but the video allows people to see it in real life and put themselves into that story and kind of latch onto it in a different way. So any chance that you can do a video, and right now everybody has the power to do really good videos just on their cell phones. The quality there is, that’s all you really need so don’t overthink that. Everybody can be a videographer now.

 

Mike Merrell:

Well that’s a great point. And even as a learning tool for within the trades. I built a fire pit in my backyard of my home a few months back and I just looked it up on YouTube. I had a friend that had done it and I was laying cinder blocks and running gas piping and cutting out sheet metal, every step. Grouting, laying stone. And I come from construction so I’m pretty candy with some of those things, but I’d never physically done that. And it looks like I paid somebody three or $4,000 to do something that cost me about 800 bucks in materials and some labor.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. Nice.

 

Mike Merrell:

And it’s YouTube, right? So video can be a powerful tool to get the message out whatever it is you’re trying to do.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Oh for sure. YouTube is, if not the biggest, it’s second as far as more people are searching for anything on YouTube even than Google too. I mean YouTube dominates search results.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. How important do you think sales people are in construction companies? I know a lot of companies adopt that and have them and then a lot of smaller companies it’s the owner or really the upper management are the only ones really actually selling directly. But what are your thoughts?

 

Todd Weyandt:

I think that there’s obviously a place for sales reps hands down. It’s a personal business in construction and that handshake or fist bump in today’s world, virtual fist bump, that goes a long way for sure. But you see the stats of most people, like 70%, 80% of people have done 90% of their research online before they ever want to talk to a sales rep now. So if that’s the only thing that you are doing is just investing in sales reps, well you’re missing the vast majority of your people and your potential customers. So you have to, whether you like it or not, you have to have a digital presence in this world. You have to have the website, you have to have social because that’s where people are going to look for you. And if you’re not there, you might as well have your closed sign hanging out because nobody’s finding you.

 

Mike Merrell:

Right. Yeah that can only reach as far as their vehicle or an airplane can take them, right?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Right.

 

Mike Merrell:

So one of the other things, and this just popped into my head, I mean a lot of the messaging that you’re sharing and the ideology is also that everyone’s in sales, even in the field, right?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Sure.

 

Mike Merrell:

They’re all a part of that sales arm and marketing arm whether they realize it or not. How do we help the field recognize their role in establishing that reputation and helping the company look as good as possible?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. I think it’s a great, important question. And it starts with telling them that they are and having that conversation. Because a lot of times, I don’t think that it stems from the people out in the field don’t care about it or they don’t want to embrace that, but they don’t think about it. They don’t, back to the head-down mentality, they’re like that’s somebody else’s job. This is my job that I’m getting paid to do.

And so to communicate that out, that goes a long way. And then follow that up. It’s not a one and done communication, it’s a consistency effort there. And then it’s a live by and set some examples. Have people throughout the company showing what that means. And maybe going back to the culture aspect as well too as I’m thinking through it is, in order to really market it well and to represent that well, you have to take pride in the company and the brand and what it all represents, which is the culture aspect of the company and making sure people are feeling heard and feeling included and feeling like they are valued in what they are doing and know the why behind what they are doing. And when they know all that and all those boxes are checked, a lot of that’s going to happen on its own. People are going to naturally start sharing what they’re doing and naturally start posting it out and talking about it more.

 

Mike Merrell:

So what I’m hearing is start the conversation and allow that message to bounce around in people’s minds so it’s top of mind and then you sort of go from there.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. Start with something and then share it consistently.

 

Mike Merrell:

So for a company that isn’t doing a good job of this or maybe for one that is, what are some things that they can do to start really marketing themselves better? After they have the conversation, what are some steps or things that you would recommend?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah. Pick a platform that you want to do. Don’t try to eat it all at once. If you’ve got a website, great. What social can you add in next? Then start sharing something. I know that there’s some people that are uncomfortable talking about themselves and putting themselves out there and that’s okay. You don’t have to. Brag on an employee, brag on a client, take a picture on a job site and share what you appreciated. It doesn’t have to be anything super complex or super intense. It takes you 60 seconds to do a post and just tag somebody and let it go from there and you’ll be amazed at how it takes off.

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah. And I think, I mean one bit of advice I would share with the listeners, just last week for the first time I posted something on LinkedIn that I like to trail run, get up in the mountains, and I was on a trail run and I thought, you know what? I’m just going to introduce myself as Mike Merrell the trail runner today that works with WorkMax and is a part of the team here. And I actually had substantially more engagement and interaction and comments and different dialogue from all kinds of people that I’d never heard from when I just posted a normal thing about our product or what we’re doing or an event where at. It was clearly more interesting and also stood out to them to just share a little bit of me even though it was on the personal side. So there there’s maybe another tidbit that the companies could try.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, for sure. Love it. I think one of the things to think about and have in the back of your mind is what makes you stop and catches your attention when you’re on social. Chances are if it’s making you stop there’s probably something there to it to use that as inspiration and an example.

 

Mike Merrell:

I love that. That’s a great point. So take note of the things that catch your eye is what you’re saying.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah, absolutely.

 

Mike Merrell:

Love it. Well great. Well so to kind of wind things up a little bit, just like ask kind of a few questions here at the end and get your feedback on. So what’s one skill that you’ve mastered or that you feel like you’ve been able to really take advantage of that’s made a positive impact on your business life?

 

Todd Weyandt:

I don’t know if I’m a master at anything. But I’d like to think of telling those stories and championing the innovation in the industry and maybe tie that with because I think they all play hand in hand with the healthy team culture.

 

Mike Merrell:

I love it. Good. What about something that you do regularly that’s become your go-to kind of your superpower, something you’re really good at? What’s your one habit that you lean on to help you be productive?

 

Todd Weyandt:

I lean into conversations. So I will sit down and talk with pretty much anybody and really seeking to learn insights there. I am not the smartest person in the room, I will fully admit that, and I want to learn from smart people.

 

Mike Merrell:

I love that. Yeah. Always be learning, right?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrell:

Is there a mistake you’ve ever made or something that you wish you would’ve done a little bit differently that you could help steer others away from and maybe avoid?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Just one mistake?

 

Mike Merrell:

Yeah

 

Todd Weyandt:

Lots of mistakes. I think my biggest one is fighting the desire to control every aspect and details. I can be a bit of a control freak and perfectionist that I have to reign that in and learn that there’s beauty in relying on the team and trusting them to handle things even if it’s different than how I would go about it.

 

Mike Merrell:

Valuable advice. I think I could surely take a lesson from that. So the last thing. So if the listeners are to walk away from this conversation with one thing in mind, what would you remind them of here at the end today?

 

Todd Weyandt:

Perception is reality and don’t underestimate the power and potential that that holds. One of my mentors always says, “I’m not what I think I am. I’m not what you think I am. I’m what I think you think I am.” Meaning it’s all about perception. So it’s how I’m seeing the world through your eyes, which there’s a lot of gray in there, but keep that in mind. Perception is important to tell your stories. Don’t leave it up to other people’s perception. Paint that picture of what you want them to do and look for those ways to innovate even small things. And there’s always ways that you can improve and up your game there.

 

Mike Merrell:

That’s awesome. Love it. Well thank you so much for joining us today. I really appreciate the conversation Todd. Looking forward to the second half of this.

 

Todd Weyandt:

Absolutely. Thank you.

 

Mike Merrell:

And thank you guests for joining on the Mobile Workforce podcast today, sponsored by about Ten Technologies and WorkMax. If you enjoyed the conversation that Todd and I had today, please give us a rating and review on your favorite podcast platform and a five stars works great for us. Also you can follow us on LinkedIn or Instagram at WorkMax_. And also please make sure that you listen to the conclusion of this two part series with Todd on the Bridging the Gap podcast which Todd hosts also. And he’s got a lot of other wonderful episodes to share there so encourage you to check those out as well. Thanks again and we look forward to continuing to bring you these valuable episodes. Again, those ratings and reviews really help us to bring these valuable conversations to help you improve your business and your life.