Maintaining Construction Management Mobility in All Situations

Today’s construction projects and job sites require teams to be nimble and agile so they can handle any surprises that come their way. But these capabilities don’t just happen. Construction leaders need to be proactive, encourage their employees to be ready for the unexpected and help set everyone up for success. 

In this episode of the Mobile Workforce Podcast Jeff Gerardi, the president of ProEst Software, shares how to build a company that can adapt to changes on the job site and in the market. 

Key Takeaways:

  1. Executives have a leadership responsibility to move their company to the next phase with technology. Executive teams should carve out a more functional place in the day-to-day workings of their companies by being involved and supportive of new initiatives, while also empowering employees to be more proactive.
  2. Automation gives employees time to analyze and collaborate on what is happening in the field. Manual processes often lead to human errors and lost administrative time. By automating processes, leaders give their employees workflows that streamline processes and eliminate data silos by giving the entire workforce access to the information, increasing collaboration. 
  3. Transparency gives way to the best outcomes in the long run. Transparency can be a painful thing and lead to some tough conversations. But once a team gets over that hump, they will begin to experience higher levels of productivity and effectiveness. 

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Episode Transcript:

Mike Merrill:

Hello and welcome to The Mobile Workforce podcast. I am your host, Mike Merrill. And today we are sitting down with the president and CEO of ProEst, Jeff Gerardi. Jeff has been running ProEst since 1992. And today, we’ve asked him to join us, to talk about growing your business while keeping quality that you are known for. Welcome Jeff, we are so happy to have you on the podcast today.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Thanks Mike. Glad to be here with you.

 

Mike Merrill:

Thank you. So first off, I got to know, tell me more about your experience of working your way up from the very bottom in a company, as a new employee, to eventually taking the leap and becoming the CEO of the company.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. So I was in a unique position when I started, way back, multiple decades ago. Where I actually started as a salesperson, and literally after a year or two, the owner was just at a position where he was ready to retire, and asked me if I wanted to buy the company. And that point, I had one mouth to feed, so it was an easy decision. And I jumped in, and now we’re three decades into it, and it’s been a fun ride, but it’s been the most fun these last couple of years with the cloud and everywhere we’ve gone.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow. That’s really awesome, and I think it gives hope to a lot of other people. If you’ve got big goals and dreams, you can make it happen, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Just got to be open for the opportunity.

 

Mike Merrill:

Very good. Awesome. Well, as a software provider, especially cloud-based software, it’s easy to see how technology can help us to solve problems across the board. But what I want to talk to you about today is more about helping your clients create those processes and structures within their organization, as it relates to the pre-construction management phase. So in your mind, where’s the biggest breakdown that typical contractors have when trying to create the standardizations for a pre-construction management process?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. So today, and I’m going to go back to who my biggest competitor is, and that’s Microsoft Excel, we like to call the big green giant, right? Every one of us on the phone uses it. We use it for multiple things, but it’s power is also all the risk that comes along with it. It’s really flexible, we know that. We’ve all used it, we’ve all built formulas and we’ve all looked at Excel and built things within it, and it’s really powerful. But it’s a silo, it’s a silo of information.

And for us, our client’s biggest hurdle is going from that 100% control over my silo, my Excel silo, to saying, “Now, there’s a company standard. Now, as we bring people onboard, we onboard new PMs, new estimators, new directors of pre-construction management, that there is a process that our company has developed that is a new standard within our business.” And as we start to put quotes out, there’s a standard we come to expect of what every one of them looks like, and what is the workflow every single estimate goes through. But certainly, letting go of that security blanket called Excel is one of the biggest hurdles, and not knowing what that journey is going to mean, right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Excel, I mean, we always refer to it as our spreadsheet addiction around here. It’s that safety net.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

We call it a monster, but I like that you call it an addiction. That’s a different twist.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yes, it is. Yeah. So in some cases it’s worse than paper because it’s so easy to erase and re-type whatever you want, and it looks cleaner, and it feels better].

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And hit a space bar, right? Hit a space bar, wipe out a formula. Now, all of a sudden a line which might’ve cost 50K is no longer being totaled into the summary at the bottom, and there goes my two, 3% profit.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. Great point. Very valid, and certainly something that we’ve all heard horror stories about, or hopefully not too many of us, but some of us have probably experienced first-hand.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yah, it’s normally when we get the call, right after that day.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And so the listeners know, Jeff, again with ProEst, it’s basically a cloud-based estimating system. So what he’s talking about is putting those controls in place, so that people don’t have data siloed and at their fingertips ready to be kind of destroyed, or used in a way that’s not helpful to profitability.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And the lack of visibility. So if I have three, four people putting estimates together, and these days, obviously we’re all mobile for a need of what’s going on in the world, but having the visibility at a corporate level of seeing what’s our pipeline look like, because in essence, we’re a sales tool. What does our pipeline look like? What estimates are being produced? What estimates are coming due this month, this week, this hour? All that visibility, within a dedicated estimating platform is possible, with individual Excel silos, is not possible.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Great point. And everybody in construction management is familiar with the estimating side to some degree, whatever process they go through. But as it relates to your business, I’m sure you have tools within your business, technology tools, things that help you to keep on top of things, what things do you have in place that help you to avoid that communication breakdown from one person to another?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Communication within our business ourselves?

 

Mike Merrill:

Within ProEst yourselves. Yeah.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. That’s a great question. So do we talk the talk? So we’re certainly preaching cloud technology mobility. We internally, went to Salesforce to control our entire platform. Our entire company is run off Salesforce, and it has since 2006-2007. So we’re 13 to 14 years into being 100% cloud-based ourselves. So when COVID hit us all, six months or so ago, we didn’t miss a beat, we didn’t miss a call. Our employees were mobile the next morning, 100% up.

So, I mean, we’re walking what we’re preaching as well. Where we need to be mobile, we need to have technology, where we can access it from a browser but as well as from our phone. We can do that with ProEst, we can do that, obviously with Salesforce. And operationally, we are using Salesforce across the board. So not only our sales, but our client construction management, our tracking of customer support cases and feature requests, it’s all happening through a single cloud-based platform.

So I think we’ve even gleaned some lessons from that, that we’ve incorporated into our platform, like configurable workflow. What’s the process? What’s the process an estimate should go through? From coming in from a business development person, to going to a PM maybe, to validate it, to going to an estimator, what does that process look like? Is there a review process? Can we control and define a company-wide process that every estimate goes through? Just like for us, I mean, every lead goes through a certain process, every support call goes through a certain process. And it’s controlled at a corporate level, and we can get complete visibility.

So right now, I could look at a dashboard and see how many support calls there were today, how many got answered, where they done in the allotted amount of time, and are we meeting what we’ve set our bar to be a great customer service company? Are we meeting that bar? Well, I’ve got that visibility. I’ve got that data to back it up.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And our organization’s the same. We haven’t been down yet, since COVID or not. We’re using all of these tools. And we did it by accident. We didn’t mean to. We built our own CRM initially, and then eventually got on Salesforce also. And we use a different tool now that has some other options within the platform.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And we went down that path as well. So originally mid ’90s to mid 2000s, 2005-ish, we created our own CRM. We’re like, “We’re going to control this.” But that’s no different than having an Excel silo. So we quickly realized that this is not our expertise. Let’s bring in a system that could help us control this, so we can really put all of our efforts into making software, and products, and platforms that our clients could benefit from, and not build their own back-office stuff. So same type of good versus evil that our clients are going through, Excel versus a standardized estimating platform.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So what I’m hearing here, I mean really to circle this back to our listeners and some of the things, even running their own business, those communication breakdowns, it sounds like they occur when data of any kind is in a silo. It’s not what others can see, its what you can see, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. Yeah. I mean, if I get a report from an account manager as an example, and it’s in Excel, I’m not a happy camper. It better be in Salesforce as well, because otherwise there’s data being produced that could be helpful for our teams to help a client outside of our operational platform, which is Salesforce. So want everything there, so we can access it and help the client as a team, not just as an individual.

 

Mike Merrill:

Okay. Yeah. That’s great. You certainly are speaking my language on that.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Good.

 

Mike Merrill:

When we’re looking at standardized data across the whole user base then, what you’re saying is that eliminates gaps, that helps us be more efficient, helps us make better decisions. And so for a construction company, not only when it comes to software, but any process, it sounds like having that inner-office, inner-field visibility with the same data.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I mean, what is the process from a business development person bringing in an opportunity to a construction company, an estimate being created, and now that estimate’s been awarded, and is it in their ERP or the accounting system to properly now track the job costing? What’s that process like? It needs to be automated, especially as you scale. There has to be an automated process where the CEO or the executive team at that business could always look in there and see, where is this opportunity in our process? Is it an estimate? Has it been awarded? Is it being built right now? And if so, what’s the job costing data? Was the estimate accurate? Was it high? Was it low? Did we miss the mark on anything? But that visibility at least allows you to use data to make some real business decisions.

 

Mike Merrill:

So basically, better data collection tools. And then as far as workflow, I mean, when you talk about automation, what does that mean to you?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

So we built a configurable workflow. So I mean, in Salesforce terms, we can create a workflow that when an estimate gets started, first of all, who are the team members involved in it? Someone’s doing the estimating. Is there a director of pre-construction or someone that’s doing a review of that estimate? Does it go to an executive team for a sign-off, depending on the dollar amount of it potentially? Well, that can be automated, so that people automatically get emailed when an estimate’s ready for it to review. There could be an escalation involved as well. It needs to get reviewed in two business days, otherwise flags are thrown up because there’s a due date we need to make.

So that whole process, what’s involved in it? Could there be an escalation? And we want to make sure that there’s no bottlenecks. And if an estimate goes to someplace for a review and it sits there for a week, well that’s a problem if the bid was due in four days. So making sure that we have complete visibility into that, so we do not miss a bid due date. And there’s accountability across the board. And they can define their own. So how many steps does it have, and where does it go? How elaborate is it? We have clients that have three simple steps, estimate, to review, to send to client. We have clients that are controlling billion dollar construction budgets, like the City of New York as an example, and their workflow is much more elaborate because there’s different levels of review, there’s potentially 20 people involved in an estimate, could be a GC, could be 15 subcontractors, could be internal people as well. So as long as it’s definable, we have the ability to build a process, that’ll work across the business.

 

Mike Merrill:

So with that, what have you done, or have you seen done, or what are you trying to do to try and help adoption become more prevalent?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. I mean, adoption is really the key here. So from the beginning, during the sales process, we want to make sure that there is executive level buy-in to start with, because if they’re not driving the ship, it’s very easy to go back to Excel or to go back to old methodologies, and we want to make sure that never happens. So we want to make sure upfront that there is a serious commitment to technology. There’s a serious commitment to the next level of their growth. So as they scale, obviously things need to change to make sure that as they put 10, 20, 30, more people into their business, that there are systems and standards in place, so there’s not a huge load on them. They’re simply plugging people into an already defined process.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So you’re talking about helping them feel more comfortable with the tool, getting executive buy-in, so there’s a driver behind it. This isn’t optional. And when you’re talking, and it’s the same with software of any of the vendors that you would see in the construction marketplace, these things are key for any company to recognize is we got to have top-level down, not only support and buy-in, but actually motivated by whatever means necessary, mandate that this is what we’re doing. The bus is going, and it’s going that way. And you need to get on the bus if you want to be a part of it, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Right. Yeah. I think that’s certainly important from the top down, that if there’s a new direction in terms of technology, that there has to be certainly a mandate from above, but buy-in straight down through. So getting as many people involved during the presentation or demonstration phases as possible is important to get feedback, to get buy-in at that level. We think it’s imperative to making sure that a implementation goes live on schedule. Because after we sell a client, we go through an implementation. And we put a stake in the ground and say, “This is our go live date. So who’s responsible up until then? Now who’s the implementation lead on both sides? Who’s the executive sponsor on both sides?”

We have weekly check-ins. We automatically are sending these out because we want to make sure that the project stays on track, just like a construction project, no different. There’s a due date for the bids. And then there’s a start date for the project, it’s the same thing. And we’re excited to… We’re at the point now where we’ve defined the process over our decades of experience. And we feel like we’ve fine-tuned it enough that we know upfront, we’re going to present this implementation plan even during the sales process, so they understand what’s the level of commitment on both sides, because it’s a level of commitment. We’re not kidding anyone here. It’s new technology into a business.

I mean, we’ve even shifted gears where we used to charge per user, and we went away from that because we want company-wide adoption. So now we’re charging based off of a platform versus just a individual user. Because we want the estimators, the PMs, all pre-construction people on the platform. As well as, who else needs to touch it? The executives want to see the dashboard, the accounting department needs to grab estimates for our job costing. So the further we can reach our users, I mean the further within a company, ultimately, there’s no limitations. You can control your own users, and the securities around them, right?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So what I’m hearing is you completely changed your delivery method of your system to companies, and there must have been some really specific reasons why you would do that major change in your business. What is that? So people can avoid it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

That goes right into workflow. So we defined what we thought was this amazing workflow, but then we charged per user and no one’s going to pay a per user cost. So that Mary, the head of accounting gets an email that a project was just awarded and there’s a bid coming her way. So the whole per user costing, we wanted more visibility of the estimate data throughout an organization, not just the estimating team, which might be three, four or five people, depending on the size of the company.

So we didn’t want people to be restrained by only certain users in the system. We want it to be full open, again, trying to eliminate silos. We created our cloud platform, which is now we’re, I don’t know, six years into this. We went live about six years ago. We wanted to make sure that we were not a silo. Because what we saw in the industry was an estimating silo, a takeoff silo, a CRM silo, an ERP silo, and it doesn’t help anyone. Certainly doesn’t help our end users. So vendors like us should open their gates, and say, “Here’s the data. Where does it need to go next? Does it need to go to timekeeping? Does it need to go to ERP?” Well, we’ve got complete tools built, so vendors can grab all that data and it never disappears within our platform. No more double-entry, triple-entry, thing of the past.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So really, it sounds like your decision to make it readily accessible to whoever, anybody who needs to see it… so the City of New York uses ProEst, not this department, this division. Is that right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

They have north of 1,000 users in the same account.

 

Mike Merrill:

Wow, amazing.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

All collaborating on estimates, all access to the appropriate data that they’ve been invited to. So there’s still control around it, but it’s still wide open. It’s still wide open. And I think any technology, even if we were to implement a new technology at our business, we would certainly make sure that the data is accessible by all departments, that the data goes where it needs to go, and it’s not siloed in a single individual product. I wouldn’t bring a product in our company that is not first of all, cloud-based and forward-thinking, so that there are APIs and tools to allow us to grab data, to put it elsewhere if we need to.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So essentially, what you’ve done is you’ve helped contractors get out of their own way. In construction, we’re master negotiators, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep.

 

Mike Merrill:

We are always looking to work the deal the best we can. And so I may shave off a few users by not letting Mary in accounting have that license, to try and save money. But in the end, we’re getting in our own way and we’re forcing data into silos, because as a business, we’ve decided we’re going to tighten up that spend on our estimating system.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. Yeah. Why not define rules at a user level of what they can and cannot see, what they can and cannot do, and have it be full wide open? And for us, it was freeing. It’s like no longer do we think we have to charge a user for an individual license. It’s more us helping them adopt and drive our product and our platform throughout their business. Because we know it’s going to be more beneficial if it is widespread and everyone has access to the data.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Well, and when we have these discussions internally at our organization, it’s the same thing. We want to be one of those apps it’s on their home screen. Something that they’re used to using, they need it often. If we can do that, and get a brain share of the users. Then when somebody moves to a different organization, or there’s turnover, or a company slows down and has to have layoffs, those skilled workers are going to go somewhere else. And when they do, and they run into an Excel-based system, or paper time cards, or some other non-software, non-technological system or silo, like you’ve been talking, they’re going to say to their new employer, or to their new foreman or superintendent, “Hey, where I was just at, we used XYZ,” or, “We used ProEst.”

And there’s an opportunity now where a user that maybe otherwise wouldn’t have had that visibility, now actually has a voice and an opinion, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And I mean, we’re doing the same thing in our business. So certainly we have to be honest with ourselves and say, “We should bring the same idea to our client base. Of kind of open doors, and cloud technology.” And we started a new education program where we’re trying to get our platform to be utilized and taught at universities, to now teach new cloud technology. What’s going to move the industry forward? Well, it’s cloud technology, and ultimate collaboration between those tools as well, is really necessary for an industry that’s really slow to adopt technology. But that means there’s a lot of space for the executives in the industry to step up and say, “It’s time. It’s time to adopt technology that’s going to help us scale, and help our business work more efficiently and more productively, ultimately.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So going back to you as a CEO now, and the journey you’ve been through as an employee. What advice would you give to people that are trying to move up in their role? Or they’re entrepreneurs at heart, they got to start somewhere. What have you learned in your decades of experience?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I think ultimately, always being just thirsty for knowledge, thirsty to learn more. You’ll notice things in other industries that will help you, as long as you’re open to it. I mean, my first estimate, I’m 17-years-old, working for a guy in New York, I think we were painting or wallpapering contractor. I grew up in construction. And we walk into this room, his name’s Sal. He’s got a cigarette hanging out of his mouth that wasn’t lit. You know that guy, we all know that guy. We walk in the room, he looks around, he’s got his arms on his hips. He goes, “What do you think kid?” I go, “I don’t know, five grand?” He goes, “Let’s do it.” That was my first estimate.

But from then, everything’s kind of evolved. And as long as you’re continually learning, continually looking at new technologies, even if you look at another product, not necessarily a competing product, but a product that’s helping you schedule something in your personal life. I have three children, I have to schedule all their sports, and everything that’s involved in that, so I have a busy life. So what has been beneficial in other platforms that I could bring to my users, that will help their lives as well? Because we’re scheduling products, and we’re scheduling construction meetings. It’s all kind of combined. It’s something that we could learn from other tools and other applications as well, I think.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, and even, how many of us are using Amazon Prime? Or maybe you have an Autoship subscription. There’s so much of our lives, the bank accounts, the bills, the mortgage. I don’t even have a paper check book that I carry anymore for anything.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I’ve been banking online probably for 10 plus years now. So if I’m okay with my financials being online, I should be able to be okay with my estimates and my construction data being online as well.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So then… Oh, go ahead.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

You’re typing your credit card into Amazon every day, so if you feel comfortable doing that, and we’re all hosted on Amazon servers, and Rackspace is are our tier one support, so we certainly have the best security available in the industry right now. So that shouldn’t be a concern at this point. Obviously, security is always a concern, but if you make sure that the vendor you’re going with has those types of credentials and those types of securities in place, then that should be put to the back-burner. And now it’s about, how am I going to adopt this technology? How am I going to drive this thought throughout our business of how this will help us be a better company over wide?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. I think generally the populace within North America, of course, and even worldwide, has moved past those general initial concerns. Thank goodness. Because I remember 15-20 years ago when that was not the case. It was a hard sell, and they wanted it on their server, in their office, right down the hall. But-

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And we’re a technology company, we don’t have a server, okay? We do not have a server in our office. Everything we utilize is 100% browser-based.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. So that’s something to be said for sure. So saying that now, going back to the market that we service, and that we work in and with every day, what are some of those objections that you get that you feel like kind of stall companies from moving forward with not only just estimating, but… Obviously, that’s your wheelhouse, but it effects everything.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. if I think about the potential clients that have stalled a decision, I think most of the time it’s the fear of unknown. What does implementing a new platform even mean? And we’ve tried to set up a implementation plan, which has, we call it the six steps to success. So we tried to be as transparent as possible, so they know what they’re going to go through, they know how much time each step is going to take. But there’s still an unknown, there’s still a leap of faith. First of all, with a company, and do we believe in the company? And I think secondary, it’s the product and the platform. And will all the employees within my business agree to utilize it?

That’s… above, and the excitement has to come from above. That there’s a technology change that’s going to help us move forward into the future. Yeah. I think it’s an exciting time, where we can make some changes. And I think the executives of the world, there’s a leadership responsibility now to help move your company into that next phase of technology. And there’s a lot of really cool technology out there now for the construction space, that wasn’t there even three, four years ago.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. And I think to your point, they’re being forced. You’ve got religious services going on Zoom or online, right?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah.

 

Mike Merrill:

There’s talk of the presidential debate being online. It’s interesting.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I have three children at home doing Zoom school right now. We had to double our bandwidth, but it’s working.

 

Mike Merrill:

And if your kids are like mine, they’re done in about an hour and a half.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Now what?

 

Mike Merrill:

But yeah, it’s more efficient at this time.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

It’s more efficient, and it’s a different world. Even at that level, at the education level, there’s more accountability. You don’t have as much in-person teacher communication. So now there’s more accountability to do a lot more work by yourself. No different than our clients having to make a decision, ultimately by their self. It’s their decision. But knowing that you have some support services to help back you up. And wherever you’re going, find the company that’s done it before. They’ve already sold clients that are your size, that are your stature. Make sure you talk to those clients. Ask clients what an implementation looks like. Call a client that’s only six months in. They just went through implementation, it’s fresh in their mind, either going to be fresh good, or fresh bad, you’re going to know about it right away. But I think that’s invaluable information to talk to a peer that’s just gone through it.

 

Mike Merrill:

Well, and I think too, and kind of to your point, your business is booming and you’re having unprecedented success. And part of it’s just because of that cloud visibility, that people, they can’t hide behind that rock anymore. They’ve got to get online, they’ve got to be on one platform, they have to have visibility. They got people working all over the place, some people working from home. The way they can do it. So in some ways this has really helped, I think the construction industry to get more online, get more mobile and really get on one platform, so they know what’s going on every day, on a daily basis. As opposed to a week at a time, when they have their round table meeting.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. I think it’s time to get more creative when it comes to how we use technology. It’s time to take off the gloves and say, “Okay. What do we need to do to grow to the level we want to grow to?” You’re a $20 million company today, you want to get to a 50. What does that mean from a technology standpoint, and a systems, and a process standpoint to get me there? And it’s just one example. But certainly, when we all scale our businesses, there’s certain things that we need to do to make sure that we’re ready for that scaling and for that growth. So I think cloud technology certainly helps that, because it scales up and down really easily. It’s flexible. You can control the scaling hopefully, if you pick the right vendor.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. Yeah. I’ve read a lot of different studies and reports, and construction is a laggard for sure. They’re second only to the agriculture industry in technology adoption.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Oh, we got the farmers beat? Is that what you’re telling me, Mike?

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Okay. So we’re not last, I’m happy about that.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. We’re only second to last. But if you ain’t first, you’re last.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

So we didn’t get picked last at dodge ball, that’s a good thing.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. But yeah, we meet with companies all the time that say, “It’s time we get innovative.” And the narrative has almost changed now to where I’m thinking, “You’re not getting innovative, you’re just catching up. You’re actually behind. Your competitors have already done this, and it’s time to kind of get current with the tools that are available to you now.”

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yep. I agree. And there’s so much more technology out there than there a couple of years ago. So I think now is the right time. There’s a lot of… I mean, on the ERP side, there’s multiple cloud-based options now, where there weren’t three, four years ago. So yeah. Being cloud-based now across a construction business is possible. So I think everyone owes it to themselves to do some research, dig deeper and find out where they could potentially gain some efficiencies in their business.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I think just like anything that we do that’s scary or new or different, there’s greater benefit on the other side of this fear than we’re going to get by holding back, doing the head in the sand thing.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. But maybe talking to some of those people that just implemented, or looking at some true case studies that some of your peers have done, it will help lessen that fear a bit. And say, “Hey, why can’t we do this? Our peer just did it. Let’s give them a call, and see what challenges they went through and talk through it.”

 

Mike Merrill:

Love it.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

And we got good guys, like you and me, here to help.

 

Mike Merrill:

There you go. That’s right. And like you, my background, I started in construction. It’s the same thing. Most innovative businesses were started to solve a problem that they experienced firsthand, and it’s no different here with ProEst, obviously. So in winding things up here, I just had one question I wanted to ask, and I like to ask each guest towards the end. So has there been a hack, or a shortcut, some kind of a process that you’ve come up with that’s helped you in business? That’s become your coined superpower for lack of a better term?

 

Jeff Gerardi:

My superpower?

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

I mean, my superpower, my wife would say is my crux too. And that is my kind of never-ending drive. You can call it a superpower, but always looking for new ways to improve my business, and improve my client’s experience with our platform has always been at the top of our list. Our core values for our business start with integrity, which is truly important, but also transparency. We want to be transparent with our clients and take them through everything we’re going through. We have challenges as a business as well, just like anyone else, we’re scaling now, added multiple employees this month. So we’re going through some of the same kind of challenges that they’re going through, and hopefully we’ve defined processes along the way to make it as painless as possible. And make things just fit together, and it be an easy process.

Because with enough pre-planning, it should be. And maybe I got to it there. Being able to look ahead, think about what your struggles are today and think through and plan for improvements. Whether that’s a technology, whether that’s another employee in a certain place, whether that’s a new process, whatever that process may be. But as much planning upfront is going to help the backend in terms of implementation and adoption, and everything that goes along with that.

 

Mike Merrill:

That’s great. So really, what I’m hearing is almost having a plan to execute and implement the plan.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

Yeah. And hopefully, we’re going to set it up for success. We’ve gone through it many times, where we’ve certainly had good implementations, and we’ve had not so good implementations. And hopefully we’ve learned from those not good implementations to continually improve our process. And I think it doesn’t matter if we’re talking about technology, or business, or your family life, we can glean something off of every experience to improve moving forward.

 

Mike Merrill:

Yeah. I love that. And that’s a great note to end on. So thank you so much, Jeff, for joining us today. Sure enjoyed the conversation.

 

Jeff Gerardi:

You’re welcome, Mike. Talk to you soon.

 

Mike Merrill:

Thank you. And again, thank you listeners for joining us on The Mobile Workforce podcast today, sponsored by AboutTime Technologies and WorkMax. If you liked the conversation or learned anything new and insightful that you can implement in your business, and you are interested in hearing more, you can look at us online or on Instagram at workmax_. Or please subscribe and rate us on your favorite podcast platform. Those five star ratings and reviews will help us to continue to provide this valuable service to the industry that we love, and hopefully help you improve those results in business and in life.